O.T. Wood Stove Temperature Query - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    A local woodstove guy here in Maine is a big believer in going by the thermometer (one like you show in your photograph) but wants the thermometer on the stack, vertically, not sitting horizontally on the stove top. On the stack is where mine is on my Vermont Castings Vigilant, and I haven't burned the house down yet.

    -Marty-

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    Quote Originally Posted by SND View Post
    I usually start burning late august/early sept, until May, I've had it going in June a few times but haven't had mine going yet this fall, probably later this week. It was an unusually hot summer in my area.

    I was hoping to get a Jotul when I replace my current Harmann Oakwood(not pleased with it or local piss poor service)
    Sure wouldn't want it to crack though. Maybe next will be a steel welded unit, easier to fix if anything happens.
    In fairness to Jotul, mine only cracked after I closed the draft a bit below wide open, in an effort to slow the rate of burning. It had worked flawlessly for many years before that. I'm still willing to get another one.

  3. #23
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    Even cracked, they still work well.

  4. #24
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    But any red is to hot I think,
    even dull red.
    I been thru 7 different stoves since 73,learned a bit along the way.
    Runnin two different Harmans right now, both "dual fuel"stoves.
    The SF150 in the barn gets pushed harder than the "pretty"
    see into one in the house.
    try real hard to stay out of the red zone.
    .02$
    Gw

  5. #25
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    All of you with cracked Yotuls, where are the cracks?

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    We have a Jotul F600 Firelight CB (which we absolutely love). The manual specifically states that if a thermometer is used it should be placed in one of the corners of the top surface. It also states that optimal burning occurs in the 400-600 degree range, as measured at that location. We normally keep it at the lower end of that range, and I don't think we've ever exceeded 500. Not sure why you would want to measure the flue temperature if your interest is the stove temperature.

    Pic from the manual:

    jotul-thermometer-location.jpg

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    Quote Originally Posted by redlee View Post
    Attachment 181027Attachment 181028
    Little cast iron stove in my shop, asked Mfg. what is the limit on stove temp, taken on the top. They said measure stack temp at 18" up and it should be 400-600. Anyone tell me what temp the top should be or the max.I need to get a guage and insert into stack.
    I know when its burning nice but sometimes I like to get a little more heat and I run it hotter and just wondering what would be a safe surface temp? Ive had it up to 700 with apparently no ill effects.Thanks
    Non Catalytic Stove
    .
    .
    you missing the point if chimney temperature much over 400F you are sending too much heat up the chimney. you only have chimney hot enough to supply draft sufficient to keep fire going efficiently.
    .
    i have a draft limiter it is a weighted door on chimney tee. if the event draft is too strong it opens a little to let air into chimney and cool it down and lower draft suction pressure. it stops run away stove or fire so hot stove get bright red hot and suffers metal oxidation at a faster rate. pot belly stoves can often runaway and get too hot. some people throw extra big coal pieces in fire bigger size coal gives colder fire. pea size coal gives hotter fire.

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  9. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Glitch View Post
    We have a Jotul F600 Firelight CB (which we absolutely love). The manual specifically states that if a thermometer is used it should be placed in one of the corners of the top surface. It also states that optimal burning occurs in the 400-600 degree range, as measured at that location. We normally keep it at the lower end of that range, and I don't think we've ever exceeded 500. Not sure why you would want to measure the flue temperature if your interest is the stove temperature.

    Pic from the manual:

    jotul-thermometer-location.jpg
    Thanks for the info.

  10. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by DMF_TomB View Post
    .
    .
    you missing the point if chimney temperature much over 400F you are sending too much heat up the chimney. you only have chimney hot enough to supply draft sufficient to keep fire going efficiently.
    .
    i have a draft limiter it is a weighted door on chimney tee. if the event draft is too strong it opens a little to let air into chimney and cool it down and lower draft suction pressure. it stops run away stove or fire so hot stove get bright red hot and suffers metal oxidation at a faster rate. pot belly stoves can often runaway and get too hot. some people throw extra big coal pieces in fire bigger size coal gives colder fire. pea size coal gives hotter fire.
    Could you post a pic of that, Im interested. thanks

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  12. #31
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    I thank you , and you made a good point about pumping more heat up the pipe than necessary!

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    Quote Originally Posted by redlee
    All of you with cracked Yotuls, where are the cracks?
    Mine are cracked, nay, broken, top to bottom thru the pine tree, which is about midway back on the side panels. An obvious stress riser. Not sure why Jotul didn't catch that.

    Quote Originally Posted by DMF_TomB View Post
    .
    .
    you missing the point if chimney temperature much over 400F you are sending too much heat up the chimney. you only have chimney hot enough to supply draft sufficient to keep fire going efficiently.....
    The two are working against each other...

    In wood stoves, the higher the flue gas temp, the higher the combustion efficiency. So lowering combustion temps lowers combustion efficiency. Which generates more products that deposit creosote when the combustion products are cooled, as they should be to get good extraction efficiency.

    And there's the rub with a metal stove, at least the way they're normally fired: Can't burn at max efficiency (excess oxygen, in most cases draft wide open) because it'll ruin the stove, then can't extract much room heat from the combustion products, partly because there's no good mechanism to do so and partly because extracting at good efficiencies leaves a toxic mess.

    Masonry heaters on the other hand, Finnish or Russian, use an insulated masonry firebox that burns wide open, then a heat exchanger that retains almost all the heat. During normal use, flue gas temps entering the chimney are very low. Total efficiency (fuel to heat) somewhere north of 90%.

    But they're fired in batch mode. Each fuel load is fired hard and when combustion is done, both drafts are closed and the masonry radiates heat till the next load, usually more than 8 hours.

    Metal wood stoves can be burned this way, too, with small loads if the space is big enough or if there's enough thermal mass in the heated space to reduce temperature swings.

    For more masonry heating reading see mha-net.org

    Neil

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    I like to run mine fairly hot, choking it only makes more mess and potential problems.
    With double wall chimneys, not too sure that thermometer will do much since I can usually still touch pipe by hand.
    Either way the pipe is part of the heat transfer and the temp only matters in the last few feet out the top end. The difference between up there and down here is your efficiency... If it can't cut it for your floor area even when properly moving the air around, get a bigger stove.

    Don't be putting any doohickeys on there that don't meet canadian WETT codes.

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    Quote Originally Posted by SND View Post
    I like to run mine fairly hot, choking it only makes more mess and potential problems.
    With double wall chimneys, not too sure that thermometer will do much since I can usually still touch pipe by hand.
    Either way the pipe is part of the heat transfer and the temp only matters in the last few feet out the top end. The difference between up there and down here is your efficiency... If it can't cut it for your floor area even when properly moving the air around, get a bigger stove.

    Don't be putting any doohickeys on there that don't meet canadian WETT codes.
    The last thing I wanted was a Stove that was going to cook me out of the shop, the little stove works fine .Keeps it just nice in the shop.
    Ive had a few times where it was getting hot and the damper was shut right off, might put a manual in pipe damper just for when it gets to the point where I cant seem to control it.
    When its hot I certainly cant hold my hand on the pipe.

  16. #35
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    The more I read here of all the problems, the more I lean toward an outdoor wood stove. While I have gas heat, I have been in/around a fair number of woodstoves,
    and the outdoor ones as well.

    If you burn it up, it's away from the house.

    Not in the middle of it.

  17. #36
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    Our Jotyl is,of all things,the "Williamsburg" model (By accident). I was there when they sent a team of 3 or 4 designers to look at furniture in the Cabinet Shop in Williamsburg. This to get design ideas from. Might have been in the 70's. Many years later,I decided to get a stove because our Mickey Mouse electric co. kept having blackouts all the time. One July I counted SEVENTEEN. In the Winter,this was not good. I have a friend who runs a wood stove store here,and he had only one Williamsburg model left which I got at a substantial discount. When he was starting out,many times I had to cut legs down so a stove would fit into someone's fire place,or cut and re thread pipes,etc.. Never charged him.

    I think Jotyl totally missed the boat on their Williamsburg design: The ogee curve around the top is way too stretched out,and for some silly reason they made the sides all convex,which has nothing to do with any 18th. C. features of furniture. But,it has been a good stove. We even have cooked on the top during long blackouts. 9 days one time,starting on Christmas Eve. And,that was the Christmas when I had spent months making my wife an Art Deco table with jewelry box. I had bought 2 Galle lamps to sit on it,and was all set to give it to her all lighted up! That had to wait several days ! I HATE ice storms! They pull all kinds of wires down!

    The Jotyl always finds a fire place to sit in!! I'll NEVER be in a house without a fire place where I can easily install a wood stove. A well traveled college professor told us that they keep the lights on better in Mexico than they do here! But,no ice storms down there,of course. But,if it isn't ice,it is wind blowing down tree limbs on them.

  18. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by redlee View Post
    All of you with cracked Yotuls, where are the cracks?
    Cracks are on the sides of the firebox. You can see where the escaped heat has dulled the stove blacking, which I refresh every year.

    It's a Jotul 606, a discontinued model described on the Jotul site as "rare." The upper portion is all heat chamber and very effective. You can place a kettle under the arch and boil water very quickly, and wood placed there will catch fire in two minutes.

    On edit: The pics were right side up when I uploaded them, how can I fix that?

    img_0310.jpg

    img_0311.jpg

  19. #38
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    Sea Farmer & others:

    Are you able to line the inside of the wood stove with firebricks in the firebox area? If so, that would distribute the heat more uniformly into the cast iron. I grew up with this style of wood stove in the basement http://www.acehardware.com/product/i...c-c3be3450248d (though not used daily). My father lined it w/ firebricks from new and we used it as a coal burner - something the stove was **not** intended for.


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