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  1. #41
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    I am bringing this thread back to life to correct a problem.

    This is one of those threads where there are two pages of responses to a simple question but none of the responses answer the question.

    Here is one answer to the question:
    Houston - Lyondell Basell North America Jobs

    This is a 36 billion dollar company with a number of plants in the Houston area. They are hiring new graduates.

    The OP problem is not his GPA. The problem is that he does not know what he wants to do.My suggestion is that the OP fills out the online application and then inquires about visiting the local plants. The OP should emphasize his current work. These polyethylene plants are full of rotating equipment that needs routine maintenance, diagnostics, disassembly, and repair. Someone with machine shop/tool experience will be useful and earn thier keep doing cost estimating and contract supervision when the equipment is sent out for repair.

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  3. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Robert R View Post
    I am bringing this thread back to life to correct a problem.

    This is one of those threads where there are two pages of responses to a simple question but none of the responses answer the question.
    .
    .
    .
    The OP problem is not his GPA. The problem is that he does not know what he wants to do.
    Fair point, useful contribution as to earning a crust.

    OTOH? We "have come to know" a good deal about the OP, and that he is bright, flexible, and self-motivated. "About to graduate" here in this part of the year seems to indicate he is planning well-ahead. Or at least exploring the options "grand scale", not just detail. As usual.

    Figuring out WHY and WITHER for an enjoyable (progression of) career(s) and a happier life? Opportunity, rather than "problem", that be.

    There is time for that, well beyond just "a job". Lifelong process, actually. Or it should be.

    Some experiences change you. Others experience you as the agent of change.

    Static situations are best left to reinforced concrete. It is better at the task than humans are.


  4. #43
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    One added idea for new graduates.... Take the EIT, or whatever they call it now. That will allow you to later get your PE just by recommendation of a few other PEs. That is something that can end up being pretty useful later.

    I did not do it, none of my two employers wanted a PE, and power electronics is not a field that demands PE as much as some others. But I could have talked my way into a job designing substations if I did have a PE, not that I wanted to do that in any way, but it offers options.

    Aside from that, when I had a potential new hire for an interview, I'd grab a reasonably complex schematic and ask the guy if he recognized anything. If so, he got to point at it, explain what it was, what it did, how it worked, and how it related to the other things on there.

    That got rid of quite a few "EEs" who had spent their careers specifying cell tower equipment, or whatever, and who had zero clue what was on that schematic. We needed people who could take off and run on their own, and I frankly do not ever recall looking at a GPA on any resume. I sure did not use it as a criterion for getting an interview. That said, the HR folks tended to, until we told them not to. A degree was enough, that was company policy.

    I think I interviewed for maybe 20 positions. we had only one dud, and he was a guy from east Europe who had a masters.... I did not recommend him, but he was shooed-in by my manager, so..... Was not a good engineer, thinking appears not to have been encouraged in east Europe.

    Wherever you end up, try to get to a position where you are the guy they call when there is a design or operational problem. Number one, it is a hoot to solve problems, and two, your name gets around, and you are more valuable, so when layoffs come, you are not on the list, plus, you have a bit more leverage at review time. And, as I have found out, it can get you some after-retirement consulting jobs as well. I just had one with a national company. I solved their electronic problem, but they had a couple more serious mechanical ones.... Basic bad engineering. It happens, and someone has to fix it if their folks cannot.

    You get there by having a good understanding of the product, and visualizing problems well, plus being able to imagine what could cause things that you observe.

  5. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by JST View Post
    One added idea for new graduates.... Take the EIT, or whatever they call it now. That will allow you to later get your PE just by recommendation of a few other PEs.
    No way. You have to take the P.E. exam after the EIT (Called FE now). You have to earn a certain number of years of qualifying experience and you have to get professional references. The last part is usually a piece of cake. The recommendation to take the FE while school is still fresh is a good one, however.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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  7. #45
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    I haven't read all the post on this thread but just wanted to throw Glassdoor in the mix for engineering jobs. I've been getting a lot of offers on their lately and if I was stateside I would hit a few up. Their site is not full of requiters and the always aggravating "Pay is based on experience". Just a quick search for ME's in Houston on my account brought up 709 jobs starting at $87K up to $190K. Seems like a decent job site and not filled with staffing companies.

  8. #46
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    Third guy to tell you to take the EIT. You want options in life, and having a PE can come in handy. And the first part is easy - or was - when you are fresh out of school. Matter of fact it was a requirement for me to take it to get my diploma - did not have to pass it, but take it. Retired head of the department was registrar (or whatever it was called)for PE for the state. State happened to be Vermont, which only has two engineering schools. A ruse to get enough bodies so the exam could even be offered in the state.

    As you have seen from comments, some of us who were hiring managers could not have cared less about a GPA - and candidates scored extra points for putting themselves through school, work experience, etc. Some places you fight the corporate culture - only certain schools and over a 3.5 GPA need apply, etc. I spent more time fighting with HR than anything else - they wanted to hire over educated idiots without any common sense who could not solve a problem.

    Good luck - you want a certain geographic area so leads here or people you know in area are best leads.

    Dale

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    Given that a lot of resumes don't have GPAs on the, and your history, I'd NOT put the GPA in there. Also, is 2.95 above or below average/median?

    When asked, about GPA I'd say "My GPA is pretty middle of the road, and while there are no excuses, there are extenuating circumstances. My father died without a will and other family members have significant medical issues, and with Dad's death a lot of responsibility landed on me me in the middle of college. I've worked most of the problems out, while successfully getting through my classes. So I actually feel pretty proud that I'm in the top half of my class, grade-wise. And that I've been able to work on the specific certifications of ____, _____ and _____." Words to that effect.

    Hope this is helpful. I do think its pretty impressive that you're getting through engineering school while dealing with this.

    PS I add my recommendation to pursue the EIT and PE. I am bosleyjr, PE*, BTW.

    *Mechanical and Control Systems, California.

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    Quote Originally Posted by bosleyjr View Post
    Given that a lot of resumes don't have GPAs on the, and your history, I'd NOT put the GPA in there. Also, is 2.95 above or below average/median?

    When asked, about GPA I'd say "My GPA is pretty middle of the road, and while there are no excuses, there are extenuating circumstances. My father died without a will and other family members have significant medical issues, and with Dad's death a lot of responsibility landed on me me in the middle of college. I've worked most of the problems out, while successfully getting through my classes. So I actually feel pretty proud that I'm in the top half of my class, grade-wise. And that I've been able to work on the specific certifications of ____, _____ and _____." Words to that effect.

    Hope this is helpful. I do think its pretty impressive that you're getting through engineering school while dealing with this.

    PS I add my recommendation to pursue the EIT and PE. I am bosleyjr, PE*, BTW.

    *Mechanical and Control Systems, California.
    For what it's worth back in my college days (University of Michigan Engineering, graduated 2012) just about everything was curved by exam scores, most of the earlier stuff was curved to a C/C+ so if you were on the average or below you had to be very diligent on projects, weekly homeworks, etc. to keep up. As you get closer to graduation there was a little more respect extended to you and the content to be taught rather than weeding out idiot freshmen, so things were curved to a B- so that if you were competent you would pass. So that would probably put somewhere between 2.7 and 3.0 around the overall average. That's one anecdote you can quote from someone who's been away from academia (and good riddance!) just long enough to start forgetting about it.

  11. #49
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    The oilfield is most certainly NOT dead. It is slowing for several reasons: lack of pipelines, too much oil being produced, etc. However, the shale wells being drilled these days have a very rapid decline curve. Their production drops significantly after a year and new wells have to be drilled to replace them. The decline in drilling rigs has pretty much stopped and rig count may actually be increasing. The problem is that the new wells are not being completed at this time.

    New pipelines from West Texas to the Gulf Coast are expected to be completed in the next 6 months or so, which will mean a lot more oil and gas being exported.

    Hire on with companies like ConocoPhillips or Oxy and you may never actually see an oil well... At Chevron, you will. Lots of bullshit working for any of the major oil companies, though.

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  13. #50
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    Greetings fellow Coog (presuming that you have not changed universities in the past few years). As to GPA - if you calculate your GPA for the last 60 hrs, is it higher? What about your GPA calculation with respect to "in major"? If either is higher, I would consider listing that on my resume. I'm 36 years ahead of you w/ respect to graduation. When I was a student, even the honor societies only looked at the last 60 hrs attempted - how I was able to sneak in after failing freshman Chemistry for Engineers and having to take Calc I 3 times to get better than a D. Not a party animal either - I was working 40 hrs/week in construction and commuting 100 miles per day - was not much time for studying and I had coasted thru high school without ever leaning to study.

    Once I was a few years out of school, I dropped any reference to GPA on my resume. I spent my career mainly at smaller companies, mostly as either a product, project or design engineer. I never wanted to do any other work other than engineering. In a smaller company, the line between engineering and the shop is less marked. This allowed me, once I developed a good working relationship with the techs in the shop, to be able to use their equipment - initially for my work projects and then for G-jobs.

    You have a significant amount of practical mechanical/machining experience - highlight that on your resume. At the bottom of your resume, have a heading called personal interests. In my case: wood working, metal working, automobile restoration, landscape photography, bicycle touring. Once you get to an actual interview, the engineering manager on the other side of the desk is looking for something to start the interview conversation with. One of your interests just might pique his/her curiosity. A couple of minutes into an interview, the interviewer, after reading my interests, asked me to describe myself. I said that I was somewhat of a tinkerer (and before I could finish my sentence) he said "me too, have you seen our shop?" Spent the rest of the interview touring the shop. And got the job.


    [alskdjfhg;3428259]Like the title says, about to finish a degree in mechanical engineering.

    I got a decent resume, lots of work and hands on experience, but shitty grades (2.9ish). Handful of certifications, mostly work related, AutoCAD, forklift, crane/rigging, and being able to QC parts. Currently working, but not as an engineer.

    Starting to look into more engineering jobs, I've been using Linkedin, but so far no responses.

    I've never really looked for work, jobs have just sort of presented themselves. Ya'll got any ideas for finding mechanical engineering jobs?

    I'd like to be on a floor somewhere, but also see the appeal of a 40 hour week in an office.

    Sort of exploring all options right now.[/QUOTE]

  14. #51
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    Does a EIT and PE behind you name really help your career nowadays?
    Would a MBA on top of a engineering bachelors put you further out?
    Bob
    Last edited by CarbideBob; 10-30-2019 at 06:47 PM.

  15. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by CarbideBob View Post
    Does a EIT and PE behind you name really help your career nowadays?
    Would a MBA on top of a engineering bachelors but you further out?
    Bob
    Having a PE helps in the engineering consulting world. In the firm I work for, the unwritten rule is that you cannot get promoted to Manager unless you have a PE. You will languish as a Sr. Associate. You cannot be called a Sr. Engineer, which is the same rank as Sr. Associate, without being a PE. State licensing boards are the reason for that rule in the engineering services world. I view an MBA as mostly a wash unless you want to get into upper management and your MBA is from a top school like Wharton, Kellogg, or Stanford.


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