OT-Alloy wheel repair
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  1. #1
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    Default OT-Alloy wheel repair

    I think we recently had a thread which reached a consensus that it was a bad idea. I am not necessarily disagreeing with that, but Шикарные диски для BMW.г.Липецк - YouTube

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    Plus, probably sold to an unsuspecting customer. I'm sure the wheel didn't suffer any compromising weakness from hot and cold working the alloy.

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    I wouldn't want that wheel but he does seem to have a real technique. There is a guy in Tucson who straightens alloy wheels and has done some for my wife's Saab. He uses heat and a press. He told me that most are done with a heqat gun and powder coat is intact. He said the metal wants to go back, just needs a little help. He wont touch a cracked or welded wheel.

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    That wheel would be fine on a donkey cart. Anything else not so much...........Bob

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    As they say where I come from ;- f'k your luck

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    That is a fairly well designed press they used for schmushing the wheel back into shape. I'd be more impressed if they showed a finished wheel and not alluded to the final finishing steps. But is it all safe? Of course it is - for Ruskies, lol.

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    In the grand scheme of things, car wheels are pretty low stressed items. The thing's being turned around by a bit of 7/8" steel, and only restraining a ton and a half of metal with a 40% COF. That isn't much loading at all until you hit the granite kerb stone. Then they deform, as shown. Repairs like that won't change their capabilities to any significant extent.

    I would have liked to see the welding though...

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    It's interesting that all the force of the press on the wheel is anchored by the 5 lug pattern. I woulda thought they would support out at the rim, opposite of where the pressing is taking place.

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    My Miltronics lathe came from a wheel repair company in Detroit. It was set up with a Renishaw probe to develop the program to machine the wheel. Everyone at the outfit was a Russian immigrant. They must be making money at it, they had just bought several new lathes. They had a boileroom with about 10 salesmen on the phone selling mostly to bodyshops as I was told.

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  14. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Rand View Post
    In the grand scheme of things, car wheels are pretty low stressed items. The thing's being turned around by a bit of 7/8" steel, and only restraining a ton and a half of metal with a 40% COF. That isn't much loading at all until you hit the granite kerb stone. Then they deform, as shown. Repairs like that won't change their capabilities to any significant extent.

    I would have liked to see the welding though...
    Huh ?

    Take a sharp turn (like to avoid a situation) and have that crack come off, the
    tire immediately becomes "not round", and just a "decorative decal" and all steering goes right out the winder.

    Yup, no stress at all.....

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    Yikes! Ya, I'd trust that wheel at 220 kmh on the Autobahn.

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    I dunno. When you consider all the really crappy Chinese made wheels on the market now and (generally) you don't see them falling apart it makes a good argument that the stresses a wheel sees are not 'astronomical' as compared to the available room for design.

    Will a wheel break when you hit a curb at 45MPH? Yes. Not many will survive unscathed. But do they break under normal driving/turning conditions? Not so much.

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    Talk about screwing around! If I was going to weld it anyways, I'd just bend an arc of good aluminum, cut a notch out of the rim and weld in the new piece and machine it.

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    I'm no Russian speaker, but I'm pretty sure that in the beginning of the video at the part where he pointed to the damage, I heard the Russki version of "Well, there's your problem!" Lol. I wouldn't put that wheel back on a car I was going to drive hard or at higher speeds personally. I refused an insurance repair for an aluminum wheel that got bent on my M3 years ago. They said fine but you'll need to pay the difference. I did, no qualms.


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