OT: anti-seize compound for aluminium bronze parts at 700c / 1290f temps?
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    Default OT: anti-seize compound for aluminium bronze parts at 700c / 1290f temps?

    Cylindrical aluminium bronze part inside alu bronze "housing".
    Any ideas?
    Need to be non-smoking(indoor lab use), continuous temps at 700c for hours at a time.

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    Had a quick google, ........ and I'd talk to Loctite.

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    There are dry film graphite lubricants that can survive those kinds of temperatures. Idk how suitable they'd be for your particular application...

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    You can make your ownm, but here's what you need
    Colloidal Graphite, Alcohol Base, 3g: Amazon.com: Industrial & Scientific
    If you don't like the alcohol base, you can also get in aqueous suspension.
    JR

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    Look into MicaLube from the BG Service Company. It's used on spark plugs on lean burn industrial engines.

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    Quote Originally Posted by MattiJ View Post
    Cylindrical aluminium bronze part inside alu bronze "housing".
    Any ideas?
    Need to be non-smoking(indoor lab use), continuous temps at 700c for hours at a time.
    Might need a "burn out" period to condition and stabilize it before use for some of the suggested materials.

    Or even consider electroplating one of the two components before assembly.

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    Quote Originally Posted by JRIowa View Post
    You can make your ownm, but here's what you need
    Colloidal Graphite, Alcohol Base, 3g: Amazon.com: Industrial & Scientific
    If you don't like the alcohol base, you can also get in aqueous suspension.
    JR
    Thanks, that looks like it might work.
    I was thinking of graphite or MoS2. "graphite suspension" could be the keyword here.
    Boron nitride might be also one option

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    question is: what are you going to do with the powders? you cant just sprinkle them on the bronze, right? there are ceramic pastes i have used that survive well on exhaust collectors.

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    Quote Originally Posted by MattiJ View Post
    Thanks, that looks like it might work.
    I was thinking of graphite or MoS2. "graphite suspension" could be the keyword here.
    Boron nitride might be also one option
    "Nickasil' worked in lining Aluminium bores of IC engines. After a fashion.

    Goop for sparking plugs is now Nickel based on many an engine. Copper-bearing, Moly, and others still exist. Moybdenum metal can be plated-on as well as applied as a goop.

    There are probably half a dozen ways to meet your need. All will need testing to confirm they do not contaminate, and that may be costly as well as time-consuming.

    What with the "lab" environment and contamination so unwanted, I'd be tempted to ask if changing at least ONE of the two mating parts to a different material might not be the easiest and longest-lasting approach to avoid seizing.

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    The colloidial graphite is what we use in many nuke applications. The others will stand the heat, but will smoke due to the oil suspension they use.
    JR

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    Quote Originally Posted by Monarchist View Post
    "Nickasil' worked in lining Aluminium bores of IC engines. After a fashion.

    Goop for sparking plugs is now Nickel based on many an engine. Copper-bearing, Moly, and others still exist. Moybdenum metal can be plated-on as well as applied as a goop.

    There are probably half a dozen ways to meet your need. All will need testing to confirm they do not contaminate, and that may be costly as well as time-consuming.

    What with the "lab" environment and contamination so unwanted, I'd be tempted to ask if changing at least ONE of the two mating parts to a different material might not be the easiest and longest-lasting approach to avoid seizing.

    "contaminate" such as messing with Moly or graphite is not too much problem but anything mineral/silicone/xyz-oil based is not wanted if it smokes during heat up.

    Aluminium bronze has been probably best compromise between good thermal conductivity and oxidation resistance.
    This is a temperature calibration "well" or dry block thus the need for thermal conductivity.
    Fluke 917, Fluke 9171, Fluke 9172, & Fluke 9173 Metrology Well Calibrators

    There is some exotic solutions like potassium filled inconel heat pipes or copper block clad with inconel but those are "rather" expensive.

    Now if someone wants to make insert like this cheaply from copper with inconel cladding inside and outside I'm all ears:


    Someone had nice job there drilling the 3mm dia and 220mm deep hole in super nasty aluminium bronze

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    Milk of Magnesia (magnesium hydroxide) is used to provide a gap filling, heat conducting, and low strength bond on stainless steel cartridge heaters inserted into heating blocks. I do not know its upper temperature limit. It was the recommended filler for diffusion pumps and plastic injection molding equipment where it might be necessary to remove a burned out heater cartridge without resorting to drilling it out.

    There are a number of patents dealing with this problem. The first one that shows up in a DuckDuckGo search is US 7012226.

    Robert

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    Quote Originally Posted by MattiJ View Post
    Someone had nice job there drilling the 3mm dia and 220mm deep hole in super nasty aluminium bronze

    Aye. The sort of a task one wants farm-out to a Finn.

    They don't know when to quit, y'see.


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    Bit of update:

    Graphite burns off without leaving a trace.

    Ordered small batches of hBN and WS2 from Luigi in Italy.
    hBN mixed to small amount of ethanol to make a sort of paste seems to work.

    WS2 disappeared from the surfaces at 600C°, I'm suspecting I got molybdenum disulfide instead of tungsten disulfide..
    WS2/MoS2 is lot more slippery(and messy) at cold than hBN.


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