OT Any one Know anything about '05 Tahoe ABS / Traction control?
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    Default OT Any one Know anything about '05 Tahoe ABS / Traction control?

    Typical GM brake lines rust out, ABS to left rear spewing fluid. I have no time to mess with it. To the shop it goes. They changed all the hard lines, I looked at the old ones, all swollen to about 2x their size in places, What a load of shit. Anyway now the ABS and traction control warning lights are on. Mechanic says the scan tool says the left rear wheel speed sensor is bad. How did it suddenly fail when a brake line popped? Never came on except at start up before. Does the Traction Control use the wheel speed sensor as well, seems to me it would. Could the issue be improper bleeding of the brakes?

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    Can't bleed the ABS module if there are any other faults in the ABS system. So when you replace the brake lines you perform a standard bleed through the bleeder screws and it will have a terrible pedal... Hook up the scan tool and perform the ABS bleed which does not require touching the bleeder screws and like magic good pedal.

    Now I couldn't tell you why but a good portion of time when I have done brake lines some abs fault hard codes and requires repair. I used to keep a spare front and rear abs sensor in my box so I could perform a bleed and ship it for those customers unwilling to pay for the sensors/bearings. The rear sensors are replaceable as just the sensor and the fronts are integrated into the wheel bearing.

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    did they do any work near the wheel speed sensor? if there is any rust near the sensor (or the sensor bore itself), that coupled with someone accidentally hitting it with a spanner while screwing around with the break lines is the most likely cause of the failure, not that you will be able to prove that, not sure about Chevy ABS sensors of that era, but if it is the "simple" type, the analogue unit with no ICs in the housing, the replacement is will probably cost lest than 50$, at least that is what the simple type aftermarket sensors cost for that era BMWs

    and yes, traction control definitely is using wheel speed sensor data

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    Quote Originally Posted by moonlight machine View Post
    Typical GM brake lines rust out, ABS to left rear spewing fluid. I have no time to mess with it. To the shop it goes. They changed all the hard lines, I looked at the old ones, all swollen to about 2x their size in places, What a load of shit. Anyway now the ABS and traction control warning lights are on. Mechanic says the scan tool says the left rear wheel speed sensor is bad. How did it suddenly fail when a brake line popped? Never came on except at start up before. Does the Traction Control use the wheel speed sensor as well, seems to me it would. Could the issue be improper bleeding of the brakes?
    KK called the buggers.

    What stroke of good fortune the past coupla weeks makes you think a sensor and/or its connectors on a 14 year-old basic medium eggplant grade of a vehicle run in the salt-belt is NOT bad? They were bought from the lowest bidder, after all.

    So, too my 2005 (Ford-era) XJ8-L. Three failures, all front-wheel. Cheap, thankfully, just a PITA. So far. Plus one of the air-suspension sensors (different technology at least..) has begun acting up.

    Ve gang to soon elt, und too late nurtured...

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    Quote Originally Posted by kustomizingkid View Post
    Can't bleed the ABS module if there are any other faults in the ABS system. So when you replace the brake lines you perform a standard bleed through the bleeder screws and it will have a terrible pedal... Hook up the scan tool and perform the ABS bleed which does not require touching the bleeder screws and like magic good pedal.

    Now I couldn't tell you why but a good portion of time when I have done brake lines some abs fault hard codes and requires repair. I used to keep a spare front and rear abs sensor in my box so I could perform a bleed and ship it for those customers unwilling to pay for the sensors/bearings. The rear sensors are replaceable as just the sensor and the fronts are integrated into the wheel bearing.
    Any way to test the sensor? Ohm meter? Does it generate a signal?

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    Quote Originally Posted by moonlight machine View Post
    Any way to test the sensor? Ohm meter? Does it generate a signal?
    They are pulse devices. Magnetic prox, commonly. Some clans self-powered, very low levels, others with a bias current off the vehicle's electrical system.

    Vehicle-independent test wants an Oscilloscope, and the wheel in motion. Easy for ME... Fluke Scopemeter is portable, battery-powered.

    That said, your OBDC is already getting that "fail" info from the pulse counter subsystem it is meant to work with. Mine - the vehicle's 'puters, not your reader OF their codes - can tell the dif between a cable/connector fault and a functional fail. Codes are online if your reader doesn't have them all stored, and with plain-language briefs.

    Five 'puters on the Jag's common communications bus take turns going borderline batf**k and telling irrelevant lies if the battery is low.

    How healthy is your battery, and are the chassis grounds free of 14 year's worth of corrosion?

    You can find more guidance faster off a google search on the make, MY, and symptoms than here on PM. They made more than one Tahoe. It will have been happening - including odd and edge cases few see all of - AND being sorted for some years, already, sometimes by VIN before/after ranges as running changes were made on the production line.

    Keyboarding is waay cleaner than get out and get under anyway.

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    If It was mine, I would do a hard relearn and see if that cleared the mil.

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    Sometimes "bad wheel speed sensor" actually equals bad connection. The first thing I would check is all wheel speed sensor connections, starting with the left rear the scan tool identified. These are low current connections and very vulnerable to oxides on the metal connector contacts. Very often unplugging and them re-seating a connector will wipe the oxides and restore proper operation. Over the years I have had numerous automotive electrical faults in low current circuits magically disappear while troubleshooting them. In every case I had unplugged connectors to take readings and then plugged them in again. Among the circuits that magically "Healed" themselves this way included

    Wheel sensors
    Grille mounted external temperature sensor
    Fog light relay circuit
    Emissions sensors
    and on and on

    Another possibility is that the mechanic unplugged some things while working on the brake lines and didn't finish mating them properly. The worst instances of partially seated connectors over the years were usually after a trip to the body shop but even skilled mechanics can get distracted and goof.

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    The GM trucks run the brake lines and the chassis harness down the top of the left frame rail. Done lots of them. It would be easy to lever a brake line out of a retainer clip and pinch a wire in the harness. Not sayin’ it happened but it seems like a coincidence that has a LOT of overlap...
    And all that that Scottl said above. Good post that!
    Joe

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    I almost wiped out a car load of teenagers when the lines on my '03 Tahoe burst. They flew out of a parking lot without looking (in a Nissan no less). Pulled right out in front of me, I was doing at least 35 MPH. I would have T-boned them. Hit the brakes and the peddle went to the floor. When I coasted to the down the block they looked at me and started laughing.
    Mechanic friend swears by the gravity bleed. Crack all the bleeders uncap the master cylinder and just let it drip and keep the master full. One good thing of this method is you don't don't trip the proportioning valve.

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    BTW. Would using SS or nickle copper tubing really cost that much more? My daughters '09 Cobalt has nickle copper brake lines and steel gas lines. They rusted through. Rock Auto fuel line kit solved it. That and a Saturday.

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    Need an ABS bleed.

    OR

    Sometimes the solder joints on the board go bad, its expensive sometimes you can salvage by re-soldering it yourself..

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    Quote Originally Posted by muckalee View Post
    If It was mine, I would do a hard relearn and see if that cleared the mil.
    What's that? just disconnect the battery?

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    Quote Originally Posted by JS View Post
    Need an ABS bleed.

    OR

    Sometimes the solder joints on the board go bad, its expensive sometimes you can salvage by re-soldering it yourself..
    X350 Ford/Jaguar master ABS unit does exactly that, and there are ways to drill a coupla holes just-so in the housing and re-flow through them.

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    Quote Originally Posted by thermite View Post
    X350 Ford/Jaguar master ABS unit does exactly that, and there are ways to drill a coupla holes just-so in the housing and re-flow through them.
    Is that like when somebody posted where to drill your I phone for the "hidden" ear bud plug in?

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    Quote Originally Posted by moonlight machine View Post
    Is that like when somebody posted where to drill your I phone for the "hidden" ear bud plug in?
    Nope. Works nearly every time. It's a genuine reflow-correctable solder joint issue, same two places on the PCB. The case is sealed, so a pro repair shop has to saw it open for more extensive rework, then kludge a method of resealing. With the drill method, one just pops-in two rubber plugs.

    So far, my OEM one is not faulty, but I've acquired a complete unit from a part-out for when the day comes.

    The car is near-as-dammit all aluminium so no rust challenges. Plan is it is to last me for as long as I'm able to drive. Newer Jaguars - even if I could buy one for the $10,600 this one (2005 MY) cost me - look like every other japanese doorstop wedge, and one cannot see as well out of them as the "classical" X350 series.

    The Town & Country vans, OTOH, also a 2005 MY at present, I just buy cheap, use up, then send-of to the crusher. I don't want any risk of liability if sold in running order and a rusted brake-line bursts. As they do.

    Average amortized cost is mebbe $500 to $1,000 a year, tires, brakes, a battery, & c. included, so they don't "owe" me a dime, several good years each go.

    Now y'all buying nice trucks at $35,000 to $75,000 new, or mebbe but a year or so old?

    Loudoun County, VA annual Personal Property taxes alone would put me off that even if the vehicle was an outright gift!

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    need to met the ten character minimum. Send a pm

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    Quote Originally Posted by muckalee View Post
    need to met the ten character minimum. Send a pm
    Overkill ?

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    'Generally' The ABS sensor doesn't know about what the fluid is doing.

    If you didn't run out of fluid 'generally' you don't need to cycle the ABS system.

    'Generally' you can back bleed by pushing the piston back in the caliper

    I don't 'think' that particular error is fluid related, it is most probably the sensor, then the wiring to it

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    Quote Originally Posted by gustafson View Post
    'Generally' The ABS sensor doesn't know about what the fluid is doing.

    If you didn't run out of fluid 'generally' you don't need to cycle the ABS system.

    'Generally' you can back bleed by pushing the piston back in the caliper

    I don't 'think' that particular error is fluid related, it is most probably the sensor, then the wiring to it
    Clearly you did not bother to read the OP or you have comprehension issues.


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