OT: Anyone built a flat roof skylight
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    Default OT: Anyone built a flat roof skylight

    like this:
    skylight.jpg
    I'd like to cover a 6'x8' rectangular opening on a flat roof. Can these be bought in kit form and built on site?

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    Problem with building your own will be the glass has to be double pane or better.
    What is your snow load like? after the first few feet of snow it will pile up on the lower sides and start to press inward as well as down. Several feet more and I doubt if any glass can take the pressure. If you build one it will have to be shoveled clear often.
    I wonder how the sidewalk skylights are made with the small glass bricks
    Bill D

    Saw these the other day on C list.

    Glass Block Skylights - materials - by owner - sale

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    Simply go to your largest local lumber yard and ask. They will be the best source for local Knowledge for what works in your climate and code requirements. ie. don't ask someone from south Georgia about snow loads.....


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    I have built a low slope curb skylight system, but not something like that. I bought the actual skylight from Velux.

    If I were building such a thing, I think I would not make it a 'hip roof' but a simple roof, with in glazed sides. Then you are just building a little dog house with a glass roof.

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    Quote Originally Posted by adh2000 View Post
    like this:
    skylight.jpg
    I'd like to cover a 6'x8' rectangular opening on a flat roof. Can these be bought in kit form and built on site?
    If I were contemplating that, I'd check Fine Homebuilding magazine/website or similar publications; I suspect there are kit suppliers out there. As others note, checking with local construction gurus might be wise as well.

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    http://www.fibreglassflatroofsolutio...12-351x253.jpg

    something like this only bigger would be easier

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    Sky lights are spawn of the devil. Roof it over....................Bob

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    Quote Originally Posted by gustafson View Post
    I have built a low slope curb skylight system, but not something like that. I bought the actual skylight from Velux.

    If I were building such a thing, I think I would not make it a 'hip roof' but a simple roof, with in glazed sides. Then you are just building a little dog house with a glass roof.
    That's the way the old mill buildings in much of New England were done and it gives plenty of light. In a couple of the older buildings I worked in they also had awning type windows for ventilation. A very long pole used at floor level cranked the windows open and closed. This could easily be used with modern windows by fitting a right angle drive in place of the crank handle.

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    The architectural term is “horizontal glazing”.

    Kawneer is a manufacturer

    Horizontal, sloped, overhead, etc
    Keyword is “glazing”

    horizontal glazing - Google Search

    Architects use the Sweets Catalog to research

    Motherload: http://www.exitex.com/files/High_Res_Capex_A4.pdf

    Okay, I’ve called your bluff; take your shoebox of Franklins to the millwork distributor and schedule the delivery to a loading dock

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    Quote Originally Posted by Scottl View Post
    That's the way the old mill buildings in much of New England were done and it gives plenty of light. In a couple of the older buildings I worked in they also had awning type windows for ventilation. A very long pole used at floor level cranked the windows open and closed. This could easily be used with modern windows by fitting a right angle drive in place of the crank handle.
    lazy bastards have electric openers now

    It should be noted that skylights are in fact the spawn of the devil, horizontal glass has much worse thermal performance than vertical. I have two in my bedroom[part of the aforementioned project] and am pondering backing them up with triple glazing.

    I also thought in the OP's situation almost vertical glazing pointing south would let in most of the light with less of the downsides.

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    Your skylight, even if a properly installed triple pane with a good frame, will have very little insulating value. It will be very expensive to get to an equivalent of R5. I love sunlight more than most, but I think you will have far more cost in the sunlight than its worth. With that large of a cold panel in the ceiling that room will require extra heat and will likely still feel cold.

    And that is not even contemplating the problems of leaks or the heavy rafters required to span either side of the light.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill D View Post
    Problem with building your own will be the glass has to be double pane or better.
    What is your snow load like? after the first few feet of snow it will pile up on the lower sides and start to press inward as well as down. Several feet more and I doubt if any glass can take the pressure. If you build one it will have to be shoveled clear often.
    I wonder how the sidewalk skylights are made with the small glass bricks
    Bill D

    Saw these the other day on C list.

    Glass Block Skylights - materials - by owner - sale
    Don't be such a doomsayer.....Jeesh

    The local Walmart has probably 50 of them on the roof, in the "snow belt" part
    of Erie.
    If you recall, we just got over 5' of snow this storm alone.

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    Nothing but trouble, if code permits have a look at a lantern roof, make the vertical upstand about 6", sit the lantern on top, looks cool inside, and out.
    Mark

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    What can I say. Our friend is an Architect in the Lake Tahoe area. Last year they got 40+' of snow. I have seen well built houses with the walls caved in from snow piled up. Not just the windows but the entire structure.
    This was because they were vacation homes and they owner did not shovel the snow away. Some of the windows, and I am sure skylights, have to be rated to withstand windblown ice falling from tall trees. This can cost several thousand for a decent size window.
    Bill

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    Clearstory or sawtooth roof is another method to get light inside.
    Velux makes solar battery powered skylights with remote control to open and close it. I suppose it is for remodels so you do not have to pull wires in the ceiling to run a motorized skylight.
    Bill D

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    Skylights are prone to leak. Flat roofs are prone to leak. A flat skylight is gonna leak, and aggravate you endlessly, unless you do a superior job of layering the various flashings, seals, etc.

    If you planning on installing yourself, take a day or two to read up on (and appreciate) how to tie the waterproofing into the rest of the roof structure. Actually, if you plan on having it professionally installed, get educated enough to grill your installer on what they plan to do wrt waterproofing. Draw up a sectional drawing, showing what goes inside and what goes outside.

    If you can accept even a 4" plinth/pedestal/curb for the skylight, that's going to help significantly. Just remember you've got rain and snow melt all over the glazing, frame and structure, so there can't be any paths from the outside to the inside. There is a definite limit to how much (any how long) caulk or roofing tar is going to help. That's why proper flashing is critical.

    Finally, don't forget to check your local building codes. There's probably something directly applicable in there.

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    Quote Originally Posted by digger doug View Post
    Don't be such a doomsayer.....Jeesh.
    Sorry Digger but when I read your comment the first thing that came to mind was You "The Pot and calling the Kettle black. LOL

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    Quote Originally Posted by B-Mathews View Post
    Sorry Digger but when I read your comment the first thing that came to mind was You "The Pot and calling the Kettle black. LOL
    Why is this ?

    I gave a very common "Real World" application, our local Wal-Mart stores, and in the 10 years or so the store has been there, I have never seen even a stain from a leak.

    And as I stated before, That Wal-Mart is located in a "Snow Belt" that
    routinely gets over 3' deep of snow on the roof.

    It's common, and it's being done every day.

    So go out and find a proper vendor from post #9.

    And Yet BillD, knows best......

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    Quote Originally Posted by digger doug View Post
    Why is this ?

    I gave a very common "Real World" application, our local Wal-Mart stores, and in the 10 years or so the store has been there, I have never seen even a stain from a leak.

    And as I stated before, That Wal-Mart is located in a "Snow Belt" that
    routinely gets over 3' deep of snow on the roof.

    It's common, and it's being done every day.

    So go out and find a proper vendor from post #9.

    And Yet BillD, knows best......
    The Fresno Sams club has buckets scattered all over the store every time it rains...

    Leaks galore since new and it is not that old.

    It seems these window systems are common in some places and there are posted existing vendors.

    Assuming those vendors may have engineering support so suggest using their contact page to ask for advise

    It seems they would be building to fit as these may not be a normal stock item so they must have application limitations or other guidelines that provide a "system approach" to insure it works.

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I337Z using Tapatalk

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tony Quiring View Post
    The Fresno Sams club has buckets scattered all over the store every time it rains...

    Leaks galore since new and it is not that old.

    It seems these window systems are common in some places and there are posted existing vendors.

    Assuming those vendors may have engineering support so suggest using their contact page to ask for advise

    It seems they would be building to fit as these may not be a normal stock item so they must have application limitations or other guidelines that provide a "system approach" to insure it works.

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I337Z using Tapatalk
    I agree that there are many different vendors & styles available.

    Make sure the installation is under warranty as well as the actual unit.


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