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  1. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cole2534 View Post
    Thanks for the help gentlemen!

    After more cutting, because some was a touch long for the splitter, I really began watching my chip. It's still a sizeable cut and the bar force, if you will, pretty low even slicing some 14-15" elm.

    I also learned that elm trees suck ass to split. I've been picking up stumps and chunks all over the neighborhood, should have about 2 cords split. But shit, there's tons more oak and pecan laying about so who knows when I'll quit.

    That said....anyone have ideas for a cheap wood rack?



    Sent via CNC 88HS
    Maybe you should have just rented a large chipper for the day.....fill a chicken feed silo, and auger it into the woodstove as needed.....

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    Cheap wood rack is two pair of 6' rebar 18" apart pounded into the ground until they're 4' high, 8' from each other lengthwise. Each of those is a face cord if you care to keep track, otherwise pick whatever distance is convenient. Stack within the boundaries. If you intend to use it within a year or two it's not a problem to leave it uncovered.

    Oak should be a breeze after doing some larger elms, the limiting factor for size will be what you can lift onto the splitter.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cole2534 View Post
    Thanks for the help gentlemen!

    After more cutting, because some was a touch long for the splitter, I really began watching my chip. It's still a sizeable cut and the bar force, if you will, pretty low even slicing some 14-15" elm.

    I also learned that elm trees suck ass to split. I've been picking up stumps and chunks all over the neighborhood, should have about 2 cords split. But shit, there's tons more oak and pecan laying about so who knows when I'll quit.

    That said....anyone have ideas for a cheap wood rack?


    Sent via CNC 88HS
    Yeah, the cheapest way to build a wood rack is to use poles made from small trees as the uprights with wood pallets on top of gravel or small stones to support the wood. Make a simple lean-to type roof out of what ever's handy.

    We did exactly that some years back in the primitive area at a sportsmen's club. We were trying to match the rustic look of the cabin that sat near the shooting range for members to go inside and warm up on cold days.

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    Quote Originally Posted by dalmatiangirl61 View Post
    You seem to have an assortment of lengths going on, I try to keep it all at 16" lengths.
    I certainly do. I have a really big fire place, 32" wide at the rear, so I grab larger logs when I can. Also, these are remnants from an ice storm so I took what I could get. If I was to fell a tree, I'd have kept it all about 22".

    I bought some materials a while back that were deliver on a 4x8 pallet, I gave some thought to putting arms on it, and plopping it in the back yard. High enough to allow the wood to dry and basically free. Plus I could move it with forks if I so desired.

  5. Likes Joe Rogers, dalmatiangirl61 liked this post
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    35d21b77-0aa0-43b0-8970-de3f1cbb5a56.jpg3b5bd954-6de5-45a7-b2b5-62e56884eb82.jpgAlways a good idea to keep firewood off the ground. I had a row of pallets with split wood and small logs on them. Spent the summer doing an upgrade.The panels are removable so I can load from the back side also. I need to re aim the yard light...
    Joe

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cole2534 View Post
    Thanks for the help gentlemen!

    After more cutting, because some was a touch long for the splitter, I really began watching my chip. It's still a sizeable cut and the bar force, if you will, pretty low even slicing some 14-15" elm.

    I also learned that elm trees suck ass to split. I've been picking up stumps and chunks all over the neighborhood, should have about 2 cords split. But shit, there's tons more oak and pecan laying about so who knows when I'll quit.

    That said....anyone have ideas for a cheap wood rack?



    Sent via CNC 88HS
    Northern Tool sells some brackets intended for 2X4's. Never bought them myself but I've been tempted and the reviews online seem decent.

    Error | DNS Resolution | Northern Tool + Equipment
    Last edited by ShaunM; 11-25-2020 at 08:03 AM. Reason: Link shows error but it appears to work?

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    Quote Originally Posted by ShaunM View Post
    Northern Tool sells some brackets intended for 2X4's. Never bought them myself but I've been tempted and the reviews online seem decent.

    Error | DNS Resolution | Northern Tool + Equipment
    15 minutes with a saw, some 1/8" 7014 and a simple A.C. buzzbox….

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    Quote Originally Posted by ShaunM View Post
    Northern Tool sells some brackets intended for 2X4's. Never bought them myself but I've been tempted and the reviews online seem decent.

    Error | DNS Resolution | Northern Tool + Equipment
    My Nephew bought a set for his house. They worked well for the price and he with no training was able to assemble.

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    I have a small rack about 3'x4' by the back door that I keep filled.
    But for the big pile, just square the ends off by alternating directions each layer. No rack needed.
    Definitely keep it off the ground though. I use pressure treated lumber scraps, but you could even use split pieces end to end.

    wood.jpg

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    Cole:

    As you’ve found, elm is a bitch to split. Wet, dry, frozen - doesn’t really matter. That’s why elm was used for - among only a few other things - the hubs of wooden wagon wheels.

    Before you split it all up, though, you might consider the lines from Lady Congreve’s firewood poem:

    “elm wood burns like churchyard mould,
    e’en the very flames are cold”

  12. Likes wyop, dalmatiangirl61, Garwood liked this post
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cole2534 View Post
    Thanks for the help gentlemen!

    After more cutting, because some was a touch long for the splitter, I really began watching my chip. It's still a sizeable cut and the bar force, if you will, pretty low even slicing some 14-15" elm.

    I also learned that elm trees suck ass to split. I've been picking up stumps and chunks all over the neighborhood, should have about 2 cords split. But shit, there's tons more oak and pecan laying about so who knows when I'll quit.

    That said....anyone have ideas for a cheap wood rack?



    Sent via CNC 88HS
    When I was a kid during the Arab oil embargo and heating oil went from less than $0.20/gal to $1.00+/gal, my brother and I would cut and split at least 10 cords before we got to Thanksgiving. Our house wasn't well insulated compared to today.

    Anyway, we learned to hate elm trees so much that we would rather go find, cut down and process a maple or hickory tree than accept elm trees given to us for free and dropped off in our driveway. Elm is miserable stuff to split, and it's horrible crap to burn.

    Today, if someone gave me a elm tree, I'd haul it to the dump and let them have it - I could get an equal weight of compost in return for the elm wood.

    Oak is good, but you need to let it dry down before you burn it. If you cut oak in the spring, it's only partially dried before fall. It really takes a year to dry down nicely. Pecan is good firewood. My preference of firewoods would go about like this:

    1. Hickory: Best firewood there is. Burns hot, splits easily, cuts easily. My favorite firewood by far.
    2. Ash: Splits very easily, burns well wet or dry. Buts with medium heat.
    3. Maple: Splits relatively easily, burns not, dries down quickly.
    4. Oak: Harder to split, burns really well once you get it going.
    5. Pecan/walnut/black walnut: Burn well. Trees are messy. Splits well as long as you're not near a branch.
    6. Conifers (pine, hemlock, firs): I don't like burning a steady diet of this stuff unless it's well dried and you know how to deal with the creosote/pitch build-up. These need to be burned hot to burn the pitch out of the chimney. They tend to split easily. Treat these trees as kindling and fast, flashy fuel to build a bigger fire. You could use dried pine/firs to try to get elm to burn, for example.

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    Quote Originally Posted by digger doug View Post
    15 minutes with a saw, some 1/8" 7014 and a simple A.C. buzzbox….
    The only material I have on hand is bar stock so just for fun I contacted my local steel supplier about some 2x4x.120 tube (tube would be first choice, fabricating from flat/sheet being second).

    "...we are currently out of stock and no incoming."

    What gives? Apparently tube is hard to come by these days? But I digress...

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    Quote Originally Posted by ShaunM View Post
    The only material I have on hand is bar stock so just for fun I contacted my local steel supplier about some 2x4x.120 tube (tube would be first choice, fabricating flat being second).

    "...we are currently out of stock and no incoming."

    What gives? Apparently tube is hard to come by these days? But I digress.
    Oh come on now.....box tube ?

    while I have plenty of short cut offs of box tube, I'm sure you could "whip something up"
    with whatever is laying around. Flat bar bent in the vise, angles welded together.

    "It's not Rocket Chemistry".....

  16. #74
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    Quote Originally Posted by wyop View Post
    When I was a kid during the Arab oil embargo and heating oil went from less than $0.20/gal to $1.00+/gal, my brother and I would cut and split at least 10 cords before we got to Thanksgiving. Our house wasn't well insulated compared to today.

    Anyway, we learned to hate elm trees so much that we would rather go find, cut down and process a maple or hickory tree than accept elm trees given to us for free and dropped off in our driveway. Elm is miserable stuff to split, and it's horrible crap to burn.

    Today, if someone gave me a elm tree, I'd haul it to the dump and let them have it - I could get an equal weight of compost in return for the elm wood.

    Oak is good, but you need to let it dry down before you burn it. If you cut oak in the spring, it's only partially dried before fall. It really takes a year to dry down nicely. Pecan is good firewood. My preference of firewoods would go about like this:

    1. Hickory: Best firewood there is. Burns hot, splits easily, cuts easily. My favorite firewood by far.
    2. Ash: Splits very easily, burns well wet or dry. Buts with medium heat.
    3. Maple: Splits relatively easily, burns not, dries down quickly.
    4. Oak: Harder to split, burns really well once you get it going.
    5. Pecan/walnut/black walnut: Burn well. Trees are messy. Splits well as long as you're not near a branch.
    6. Conifers (pine, hemlock, firs): I don't like burning a steady diet of this stuff unless it's well dried and you know how to deal with the creosote/pitch build-up. These need to be burned hot to burn the pitch out of the chimney. They tend to split easily. Treat these trees as kindling and fast, flashy fuel to build a bigger fire. You could use dried pine/firs to try to get elm to burn, for example.
    We get a handful of chimney fires a year from people burning pine year after year and not cleaning their chimneys.

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    Quote Originally Posted by plastikdreams View Post
    We get a handful of chimney fires a year from people burning pine year after year and not cleaning their chimneys.
    When I visited Chile, I noticed only Pine being burnt, and when I inquired I was told "That's all we got"
    And "Yes, we need to clean the chimneys often"

  18. #76
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    Quote Originally Posted by plastikdreams View Post
    We get a handful of chimney fires a year from people burning pine year after year and not cleaning their chimneys.
    Ya, no pines/cedars burned in my house.

    Sent via CNC 88HS

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    Quote Originally Posted by digger doug View Post
    When I visited Chile, I noticed only Pine being burnt, and when I inquired I was told "That's all we got"
    And "Yes, we need to clean the chimneys often"
    I wait for either a rainy night, or a good snow where I know there is at least 6" on the roof, load woodstove full of cardboard and let it rip. Pine, its all we have in any quantity.

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  21. #78
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    I have a lot of respect for chimney fires, as far as the amount of harm they can do a person.

    I recently found a flexible whip tool that allows you to clean the light carbon out of a chimney from the bottom, using a drill for the motive power.

    Way easier than climbing a ladder and standing at the top of my chimney, 30-odd feet in the air. Pretty sure the system I got was a Sooteater brand one. Not super cheap, about the same as the same length in fiberglass pole sections and a steel brush, but so much simpler to use, and can be done from indoors, so you are not as like to put it off for too long!

    One of the other places on our property has a fairly low pitch roof, we just leave the brush up there year 'round, and it's pretty simple to hop up there and shoot the brush down the far shorter chimney, and be done.

    No hard wood to speck of around here worth burning. Lots of Douglas Fir though. I think I got most of this winter's wood out of one standing dead tree. About 4 feet across the stump, and had been dead for a little over 6 years or so. Three of the bottom rounds, cut at about 16 inches, were enough to fill the truck box. It's dry as a popcorn fart and burns a treat!

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    Quote Originally Posted by plastikdreams View Post
    We get a handful of chimney fires a year from people burning pine year after year and not cleaning their chimneys.
    Ditto, esp. cabins up on top of the mountains in our fire district. It takes us 45+ minutes to ram our engines up the road to the top of the mountain to get at these properties.

    We haven't lost a foundation yet.

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    Quote Originally Posted by trevj View Post
    I have a lot of respect for chimney fires, as far as the amount of harm they can do a person.

    I recently found a flexible whip tool that allows you to clean the light carbon out of a chimney from the bottom, using a drill for the motive power.

    Way easier than climbing a ladder and standing at the top of my chimney, 30-odd feet in the air. Pretty sure the system I got was a Sooteater brand one. Not super cheap, about the same as the same length in fiberglass pole sections and a steel brush, but so much simpler to use, and can be done from indoors, so you are not as like to put it off for too long!
    You need a drone....glue some toothbrushes on the ends of the blades....


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