OT: Dental crown gold or Zirconia - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    I don't know what the material is, but I have 2 or 3 Cerec crowns, I can't even tell which teeth they are. I had a gold one that I finally lost after about 30 years.

    The Cerec is cool, you go in and leave with the crown in one setting. No lab work, no temporary crowns. I watched it machine out the tooth while I was waiting, then it was baked for a little while and it was ready to place. Fit perfect. The whole process only took a couple hours.

  2. #22
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    The gold in crowns is actually a gold/palladium alloy. Not sure of the percentages.

    Pure gold is way far too soft to be of use for this.

  3. #23
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    Hi All:
    I used to be a dentist too.
    My vote is for gold wherever possible.
    Two main reasons:
    1) you don't have to chop as much of the tooth away to make room for the crown, so it's kinder to the tooth.
    2 It's the strongest material that fits the best, is kindest to the opposing teeth, and can it be glued in place with less aggressive cements that are also kinder to the tooth.

    My own mouth is full of gold inlays and onlays, done by a buddy decades ago.

    Cheers

    Marcus
    Implant Mechanix • Design & Innovation > HOME
    Vancouver Wire EDM -- Wire EDM Machining

  4. #24
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    I think the situation is a bit different for crowns and full-on replacement teeth. I shattered a bicuspid a couple of years ago and was offered two basic choices: chop up the adjacent two healthy teeth to mount a bridge, or get an implant and mount a full replacement. Once the implant finally healed, I had a zirconia replacement mounted.

    The actual implant is an internally- and externally-threaded screw. When it heals up, they leave a "healing abutment" screw in the ID to keep the gum from growing over the implant. When they are ready to mount the tooth, they remove the healing abutment and torque a stud into the implant. The bottom part of the replacement tooth is placed over the stud and screwed in place. I suppose there's a nut involved, but was not looking in my mouth while the dentist worked. :-) Then the upper part of the replacement tooth is cemented to the bottom part.

    Interestingly, my dentist had to send out for my tooth, but by the time I came back for a followup exam, his office was equipped with a miniature 4-axis milling center to carve unfired ceramic blocks into teeth and a sintering oven to fire and glaze them. I think there is also a 3D photogrammetric capture device at the front end of the workflow, but haven't seen that yet. It's all desktop technology.

  5. #25
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    Hi sfriedberg:
    Yep dental implants are the new standard of care for replacing missing teeth, and the way you describe it is essentially correct.
    The "Stud" you refer to is actually an implant "Abutment" and it's bolted to the implant with a single screw coming down from the top; the abutment is like a tall fancy washer with a counterbore in it for the screw head, so no nut is involved.
    The tooth shaped crown is then glued on top of the abutment, and the location of the screw is marked prior to the install by the lab that made the crown.
    That way if the dentist has to get at the hidden screw he knows where to drill through the crown to find the screw head.
    Cheers

    Marcus
    Implant Mechanix • Design & Innovation > HOME
    Vancouver Wire EDM -- Wire EDM Machining

  6. #26
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    Implants are a step beyond crowns/caps. Different ballgame.


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