OT dial calipers or vernier, easy to read? - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by michiganbuck View Post
    Qt Gordon[At technical schools here time is still spent teaching students how to read a vernier caliper. Never a dial or digital.] Perhaps because dials and digitals don't need much/any teaching to understand. Still all should be taught or at least tried. ImHO.
    All three types are tried and used at technical schools here but my guess is that teaching dial and digital isn't regarded as necessary.

    If you can tell the time you can read a dial caliper.

    A "problem" with metric dial is that some have one revolution for 2mm so you can read 1mm off if you don't read carefully. Not something most do more than once

    YouTube

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    Quote Originally Posted by crossthread View Post
    I use digital, dial and vernier but prefer digital. To me it is all about having backup measuring devices. If your battery craps out and you don't have a spare on hand then it is really important to have something else you can use.
    Under ten inches / 25 cm, it's one of several LCD digital for quick-switch between Metric and US as much as any other factor. "It's America". We use BOTH, and all the time.

    OVER that size, (up to 40-inch - one full meter?) I seldom NEED one at all.

    So I'm good with "obsolete" Verniers bought used-but-good as can sit forever without batteries a factor, nor fragile racks for a dial.

    Not a lot to do with which one is "easy" to use. Not a big deal.
    Vernier's were all we saw, "formative years", read plain as day and right away to any grey-hair.

    Just about being a cheapskate as to having more "reach" in the metrology cabinet than otherwise economically justifiable.

    Same again "extension" bars bought on the cheap for the gage block sets.

    In theory, I can stack gage blocks to NINETY friggin' inches.

    In theory. Only.

    I hope we all know how silly that could get "in practice"?

    Fussin' over what is actually a personal preference w/r calipers ain't all that much LESS silly, either.

    Same as blanket-sharers. No need to convince anyone else. The uninvolved a thousand miles away ain't measuring YOUR parts.

    Go with whatever works best for YOU.


  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by mhajicek View Post
    Digitals are the easiest to read. Also the easiest to mis-read when you don't notice it's zeroed wrong or that it skipped a bit due to coolant. I find I get the best readings from dials, until chips get in the gears.
    Neither of these things happen with modern quality digitals. Use it in ABS mode and you have to be extremely deliberate to shift the zero. Any scale contamination will show an error.

    Lots of people seem to dislike digital calipers, but none of the reasons given ever make much sense to me.

    Digitals are faster to read and easier to read at awkward angles than vernier calipers, and are more robust and less error prone than dial calipers.

    The first few generations of digitals had their downsides. Nowadays, not so much.

    Tesa are my favourite, Mahr second.. They feel better than Mitutoyo, and the controls are better. The Mits are a bit too easy to accidentally switch to incremental mode, not so on the Tesa or Mahr. IP67 Mits are quite heavy to slide because of the additional sealing. Mahr are a bit like this too. Tesa have found a way around this somehow and the IP67 versions slide just as freely as the standard ones.

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    You may all like digital calipers but that was not the question. You may be able to read digital easily but can you read English?

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    Quote Originally Posted by camscan View Post
    You may all like digital calipers but that was not the question. You may be able to read digital easily but can you read English?
    When it seems like it might be worth the effort I will give it my best shot. I didn't read the linked articles...

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    Default russian caliper use

    I have stacks of digital calipers--on a good day maybe one in two will function accurately

    as I view russian machining videos I notice predominate use of vernier
    calipers---work quality is typically top drawer

    but one half--or more--of machining activity occurs , like mine, in unheated shop----my shop temp today is 29 F--and I will be milling/turning

    so my latest metrology arrivals are vernier--and I doubt that I will see shop temps low enough to invalidate their use--

    of the dozen or so digitals soaking cold in shop --one or possibly two might register reliable reading----so I am going ЯUSSIAИ

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    Quote Originally Posted by gustafson View Post
    Verniers are antiques, they are not useful in a money making enterprise. Digitals in long lengths are cheaper now

    I use dials almost exclusively because you can see more quickly your own misuse. When quickly checking parts at the machine you can see the dial dip quickly, where the digital readout one must read the number, and it is possible to miss undersize parts.

    I don't see that issue for inspection since one is generally moving at a slower pace.

    the majority of the error in calipers is in how you use them.

    I prefer Etalon/B&S dials as I find they repeat perfectly.

    If I am really measuring down to less than 2 thou, I am using mics
    "the majority of the error in calipers is in how you use them."

    And that is a fact.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gordon B. Clarke View Post
    "the majority of the error in calipers is in how you use them."

    And that is a fact.
    I just squeeze until I get the right number, seems legit.

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    Quote Originally Posted by plastikdreams View Post
    I just squeeze until I get the right number, seems legit.
    Almost have it right. You measure once, if it’s the right number move on to the next part. If it’s not the right number you keep measuring until you get it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by plastikdreams View Post
    I just squeeze until I get the right number, seems legit.
    hey I can do that with micrometers too!

    I hate all the friction devices on mics, I am most accurate trusting the torque of my fingertips.

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    Quote Originally Posted by gustafson View Post
    hey I can do that with micrometers too!

    I hate all the friction devices on mics, I am most accurate trusting the torque of my fingertips.
    Oh man I can squeeze 10k out of a non carbide jaw micrometer...I may or may not have used pliers before.

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    Quote Originally Posted by gustafson View Post
    Verniers are antiques, they are not useful in a money making enterprise. Digitals in long lengths are cheaper now

    I use dials almost exclusively because you can see more quickly your own misuse. When quickly checking parts at the machine you can see the dial dip quickly, where the digital readout one must read the number, and it is possible to miss undersize parts.

    I don't see that issue for inspection since one is generally moving at a slower pace.

    the majority of the error in calipers is in how you use them.

    I prefer Etalon/B&S dials as I find they repeat perfectly.

    If I am really measuring down to less than 2 thou, I am using mics
    My goto calipers are 6" dial Etalon's, by far the best fit/feel for me. Never cared for Starret (and hence I don't own any Starret calipers)... do have Brown & Sharpe and Mits, though rarely used.

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    I can answer the original question, the dial is easier for me to resolve. If I were to use a beam caliper daily I’d have a digital beam type, but I use my calipers rarely.

    These caliper threads kind of intrigue me because early on there weren’t many calipers around me so we used other tools for whatever task (mostly mics, rules, dividers, squares & tapes). When they did become more common I did acquire a number of them up to 24”.

    Then when the 6” dials got affordable they caught on. IMO though, they were often being used unwisely. Guys would check stock size, do layout marking and then measure tight tolerance diameters, check tight tolerance shoulder lengths, etc, etc…

    I’ll give answer… No F’ing way anybody checks a 6” bar in the stock rack faster than my hook scale. No way is the caliper working past a counterbore to get further to the real bore than the ID mic. You need a 48” beam caliper to have jaws wide enough to get the real estate an OD mike does to square things up. I do like my 6” mit & 9” starret dials but no way I’d use the ID jaws to scribe a circle. The list is endless.

    I do like my 6” mit & 9” starret dials but no way I’d use the ID jaws to scribe a circle.

    Carry on,
    Matt

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