OT- Do catalyst hardeners work with standard oil based enamels ?
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  1. #1
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    Default OT- Do catalyst hardeners work with standard oil based enamels ?

    "work" as in speeding drying times and painted surface hardness ? An example of "standard oil based enamel" would be Sherwin Williams All Surface Enamel.

    Like this for example - https://www.tractorsupply.com/tsc/pr...CABEgLCZ_D_BwE

    Thinking in terms of machine tool paint that is not so hard as Awlgrip or Polane, but a little more scratch resistant than standard issue enamel....and can be applied with roller rather than spray.

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    Yes they do.

    When thinning the enamel, don't use 'paint thinner', use a medium reducer such as Klean Strip painters solvent. For a extra nice finish, add a squirter full of Smoothie fish-eye eliminator.

    Stuart

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    As atomarc said, not as tough as dedicated two part paints but tougher than with no hardener. Also used for striping enamels that will be topped with two component clearcoat. A friend had a VERY expensive custom paint job on a bike fail because the striper didn't add catalyst. The clear peeled off in sheets over the striping.

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    I used to be a SW dealer back in the 70's when they came out with the hardner for enamels. It did have a different pn than the urethane hardners but don't remember what the difference was if any.

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    The catalyst you linked to is the one you want to use. I have used it with Rustoleum. You can reduce the rustoleum with acetone if needed. Be careful about breathing the vapors.

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    I have also used the TSC Majik hardner (and Majik reducer) in Rustoleum with great success.

    Mike

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    I was under the impression the tractor supply(majic) hardener did not make the paint any harder. It just speeded up the curing process so the paint got full hard in under one week.
    I use Coleman fuel to thin the tractor paint. It is mainly naptha
    Bill D

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    I knew auto paint places made a urethane enhancer, but assumed there was a bit more science to it. Glad this subject came up.

    I will say even a modest baking[leaving a small part under a incandescent lamp overnight] makes krylon etc hold up better.

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    Do these catalyzed hardeners also increase the chemical resistance to solvent cleaners (like acetone, toluene, etc)?

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    RH, Can you delete some messages in your mailbox? I'd like to PM you about a gear question.

    claya

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    Quote Originally Posted by RH68 View Post
    The catalyst you linked to is the one you want to use. I have used it with Rustoleum. You can reduce the rustoleum with acetone if needed. Be careful about breathing the vapors.
    I'm aware this is a dead thread, but just noticed this post and will say this, the hotter the reducer used, the less sheen you'll get out of the paint. You can use acetone or lacquer thinner for that matter, but as the reducer becomes 'hotter' the final sheen of the finished paint becomes more dull.

    Stuart


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