OT, framing a header, size?
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  1. #1
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    Default OT, framing a header, size?

    Anyone familiar with building codes? Below is the NC building code chart. For a 36' wide building (this would be the non load bearing end wall I am installing a 10' wide door. Looking at the chart I need 4-2x12 for header? Does that mean qty 4 boards that are 2x12 size? I always built headers from 2 boards vertical capped top and bottom with 2x4

    And I know I need to call inspections. And I have. They are busy with the 1000 new homes going up and wont call back. THey would rather come out and fail you. I can complain up the chain of command, and am sure that will help every inspection fail forever and ever.

    header-chart.jpg

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    I don't know. But why would it matter how wide the building is? The door (opening) width is all that should matter. That is assuming you have vertical studs on either side that hold up the header. And if there aren't vertical studs, then the door width isn't really 10'.

    That chart seems mysterious.

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    That chart is captioned for exterior bearing walls, not your condition.

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    If you need 4 2x12s that is not gonna fit flush with 2x4 or 2x6 stud walls. And I think that chart may not be for the application you have. A 10’ opening is not that big a hole.


    Look at LVL headers.
    Microllam(R) LVL Beams :: Weyerhaeuser

    Microllam(R) LVL Headers :: Weyerhaeuser

    If you’re doing this by hand, 2 thinner beams spiked together after placement will let you get them placed easier than one big beam.

    There are design and spec sheets linked off that page. They will fit codes most anywhere.

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    If your still in the "design" stage consider going to a 12' door. Amazing how much more room you have coming in and out of the building.
    2nd on "gluelams" of which there's probably a few manufactures out there now.
    The benefits of virtually no sag or bowing out or in are worth the extra $ if only for one opening.
    They are a little heavy to install, in my previous life we had a general contractor that speced them for all headers more than 2x6s.

    Building a simulate header with a full sandwich of 1/2" real plywood with construction adhesive will fill 3-1/2" if your wall is 2x4.
    2x6 wall (3) 2x's and 2 layers of 1/2" plywood if you want to build your own really strong header.

    The glulam supplier may also have the answers your looking for

    Most building codes require an engineers/architects stamp on a design.
    If your allowed and presenting your own design to a building department, you can almost never go wrong with over deigning a wall system

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    If they won't answer the phone, go to the office. I have done this several times and had a friendly chat. Very useful to be face to face. You often get some useful tricks that you may not have thought of.



    Quote Originally Posted by Mebfab View Post
    Anyone familiar with building codes? Below is the NC building code chart. For a 36' wide building (this would be the non load bearing end wall I am installing a 10' wide door. Looking at the chart I need 4-2x12 for header? Does that mean qty 4 boards that are 2x12 size? I always built headers from 2 boards vertical capped top and bottom with 2x4

    And I know I need to call inspections. And I have. They are busy with the 1000 new homes going up and wont call back. THey would rather come out and fail you. I can complain up the chain of command, and am sure that will help every inspection fail forever and ever.

    header-chart.jpg

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    Rules for garage door headers have changed in the last 10 -15 years. The header needs to extend quite a ways beyound the door opening . Like about 12" or more past the double studs on each end. This is to allow a portal wall, strong wall or such to tie down the header and prevent racking.
    Bill D

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    If this is a gable end wall, you could possibly use a truss.

    Tom

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    The table assumes that the header supports floor joists and roof rafters. If is is gabled end wall, then you only need to support the wall above. If it has plywood or OSB sheathing it is pretty much self supported. Two 2x10s would be fine. If it concerns you use 2x12s, which will shrink quite a bit, or two 9-1/4" LVLs.

    You only need 1-1/2" bearing at the ends. If it makes you feel better, then use 3".

    If this is a new opening you do need to consider wall bracing. Assuming there is quite a bit of solid wall at one or both sides of the door, then bracing is probably not an issue. If not, bracing becomes a big issue. There are various options for bracing garage door openings. Google will give you some options, but understanding code requirements for wall bracing is confusing.

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    Quote Originally Posted by GregSY View Post
    I don't know. But why would it matter how wide the building is? The door (opening) width is all that should matter. That is assuming you have vertical studs on either side that hold up the header. And if there aren't vertical studs, then the door width isn't really 10'.

    That chart seems mysterious.
    It’s about the header for the entire width of a load bearing end wall, not the width of the door header that happens to be in/under that wall?
    For a 10 ft door you’re use a 10 foot (or closest longer) end wall table???

    Likely 2 2x12 or 3 2x10 would be sufficient?
    Don’t know for certain however.

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    Agree with the posts - that table is not appropriate to your situation.

    You are putting a door on a gable end? no actual loads transfered from floor joists, or roof truss above?
    If you have to have it inspected, then try to find a different table for your actual situation.
    Or take a sketch into the office for advice, making sure the sketch and they understand the actual loads.

    2 - 2 x 10's would be adequate for 10' span, no loads from above.
    However, I would be more concerned for a door as Bill D mentions, reacting any lateral wracking forces from windloads against the door/wall; or from forces that act and flex when the doors are opened/shut.

    Thank goodness i'm in upstate NY, and in Ag classification.

    smt

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    Quote Originally Posted by stephen thomas View Post
    Agree with the posts - that table is not appropriate to your situation.

    You are putting a door on a gable end? no actual loads transfered from floor joists, or roof truss above?
    If you have to have it inspected, then try to find a different table for your actual situation.
    Or take a sketch into the office for advice, making sure the sketch and they understand the actual loads.

    2 - 2 x 10's would be adequate for 10' span, no loads from above.
    However, I would be more concerned for a door as Bill D mentions, reacting any lateral wracking forces from windloads against the door/wall; or from forces that act and flex when the doors are opened/shut.

    Thank goodness i'm in upstate NY, and in Ag classification.

    smt
    Definitely not the correct table. No significant vertical loads to carry presuming this is no second floor above.

    The lateral / racking loads probably won't affect the header design for the door much, but they will need to be taken into account for the wall on either side of the door which may need to be built as sheer walls, basically glue and screw sheathing to both sides of those walls.

    Also agree with a wider door, 12' is much more comfortable and as much height as possible, ideally 14'.

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    West of the rockies, or in coastal areas, tornado country,etc the portal walls will have to be a shear wall with the header on top. Probably 16" minimum extra header on either side.
    Bill D

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    I used to frame houses long ago. That table is for load bearing walls so does not apply. I personally would use (2) 2x12 ( 1/2" plywood in the center) as I don't build to minimum standards (2x10) for my own use. Be sure to crown the 2x12s up. There will be no significant load on the header so the only possible issue is a slight sag over time that could bind the door. All this is assuming your design has a self supporting ridge so that the rafters and ceiling joists form a truss like triangle. If the design includes a ridge beam (cathedral ceiling) with a post going down to the header, that creates a point load on the beam. Point loads on a beam require an engineer to calculate beam size.

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    What's the construction of the building? If it's a "pole barn" or post frame situation, mine has virtually nothing for a header. Like a 2x8 and another 2x8 flat to keep the birds from flying in a hole. this is for a 10x16 door in the gable end of the building. Not in a seismic zone, as that may change things up a bit.

    Do some neighborhood research on similar buildings. Take a 6-pack.

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    The problem here is to make sure the inspector doesn't give you a hard time after you've built the wall.
    As everyone has stated, you don't need much of a header in a non load bearing wall.
    Maybe go see them, get an opinion, and make sure you get the guy's name that gave you the opinion.
    Alternatively, maybe you can find an email address and send your question, and what you propose to do. Then, hopefully , you've got an answer you can hold them too.
    My son had a similar problem in Asheville - drove him nuts trying to get it straight before hand.
    Good luck,
    Bob

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    Second that!

    A trip to the building department is a good idea.

    They are local enforcement of local version of code and often may be able to suggest better plan.

    Helped us greatly in our project in the past.

    Take notes and names as often there may be "hidden rules" that someone may show you that someone else is not aware of.

    Saved our butt it did.

    Sent from my SM-G781V using Tapatalk

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    Inspections office is closed to public. Pretty much have to catch them on the phone (tough to do), email (dont respond), or schedule an inspection (they are charging if they have to come back)

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    My son reverted to hanging around the office at the end of the day waiting for one of them to return. They probably use one of the city trucks, with city signs on the door, so you can recognize the buggers, or they carry some form of clipboard.
    Problem is it's their bat and ball !
    Good luck,
    Bob


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