OT- Home stuff... ideas for transition from wood to tile where wall once stood ?
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  1. #1
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    Default OT- Home stuff... ideas for transition from wood to tile where wall once stood ?

    Below pix are what might have looked ok...if the contractor had used oak that matched and not ripped a narrow strip... will look even worse when stained/finished.... time to tear it up and start over.... but with what... smaller tiles perhaps ?

    img_3315-1.jpg img_3314-1.jpg

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    If you can still buy the tile then tear up the first row of 1/2 tile and replace with full size tile. Looks like that would take you just about to the wood.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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    Someone actually did that, looked you in the eye, and then asked to be paid for it?

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    If you can find oak that matches better I would redo the wood. Use two full width pieces with two ripped pieces of equal size on each side of the full size strips.

    Your contractor took the easy way installing the new flooring and it looks like crap.

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    A bummer, for sure. Short of replacing the floor in either room, my only suggestion would be don’t try and hide or blend the transition. Instead, bridge the gap with a slightly raised threshold. A single wide board that overlaps both the tile and the wood. Same as a regular width doorway.

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    Astroturf? no,

    when I was a kid we had a similar situation where a wall was removed. Folks had a solid piece of oak cut with a bevel on the sides. Came out good.

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    Quote Originally Posted by TeachMePlease View Post
    Someone actually did that, looked you in the eye, and then asked to be paid for it?
    Yes, that's just terrible work. You shouldn't sign off on it.

    Quote Originally Posted by Dumpster_diving View Post
    A single wide board that overlaps both the tile and the wood. Same as a regular width doorway.
    That sounds like a good solution. The overlap will hide the unfinished ends that the baseboard or shoe mold on the removed wall use to cover.

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    They’ll thresholds for this
    Stain the wood to match then add a overlapping threshold
    You think you would trip over it but actually it serves as a visual reminder not to step on it

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    Once told to me - ''if you can't hide it, make it obvious'' - so how about???

    As you've 2 different floor finishes why not make the ''joining strip'' a complete contrast, like (just saying ) a plain black tile

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    Buy a tile similer to existing and cut them in triangles or small squares to make a feature and use an aluminum strip at the transition between tile and wood.

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    Quote Originally Posted by plunger View Post
    Buy a tile similer to existing and cut them in triangles or small squares to make a feature and use an aluminum strip at the transition between tile and wood.

    Or stone tiles. My favorite. 5-3/4" square. Makes for a nice transition from one space to another.

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    Two ways to go:

    - IF.. you can get it FLUSH, and to under a quarter of a mm, THEN the Mark One Human "walking susbsystem" will not trip.

    - ELSE you need a peripheral vision visual klew that automagically raises a moving Mark One Human FOOT by as little as a half a mm.. so it will not trip.

    You think I jest about just how precisely humans walk or how tiny the increments of lift whenever on familiar ground, take note that even a "lipped" floor-tile within our own residences can trip us up.

    And yet? All the while we cruise broken pavement of an Asian city's bumpy dog-bone "bricked" sidewalks without stumbling.

    See "Hollywood saddle" wide marble sill with long taper approach, both sides, if need be.

    It is the visual klew of the contrasting colour, same as a wide hardwood sill, that makes it safer, rather than worser as a potential trip-hazard.

    Otherwise, spend the coin.

    White hornbeam do yah? Dare yah!

    Page Two:

    CHEAP, Iyam.. A flush-inset strip of short-nap carpet about a 8 to 12 inches wide as can be lifted out for cleanup works well, too.


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    I know what I would do but I usually want to shoot my self about half way through with all the extra work I create.

    I suspect the ends of the hardwood flooring do not make a straight line as they only had to be close as they were coverd by baseboard. So I would first cut the hardwood floor back to the wall line instead of in a couple of inches as it is now. I know you have experience with woodworking but I will state the following anyway. To get the least splintering cut on the wood tape the area of the cut with masking tape. Overlay the the cut area with a piece of partical board and screw it down (to or through the new boards currently inplace to keep it tight. Screw a fence to this and put a new sharp blade in the skill saw. Use a good carbide blade as you may hit some flooring nails. The difficult part will be the cut near the ends where the skill saw will not travel. Fortunately the cut only needs to look good in the top 1/16 inch. So starting with utility knife and straight edge and progressing to multitool or other weapons of your choice cut the rest of the wood ends.

    I would remove the new wood and fill with a tile that accents the existing tile and lay if diagonally as suggested to make it a feature. Seal the ends of the wood flooring before grouting the tile. Any moisture will cause visible warping. Grout the line next to the wood using a flexible grout (comes in tube like caulk in standard grout colors)

    Bill

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    Get a real flooring guy over and have him trim the ends of the oak straight and then install a proper header where the two floors join. Finish all the wood to match. You may have to refinish the entire floor to make it right. If he can’t get it perfectly the same height, a transition strip that lays over the wood to tile joint is accepted practice.

    Alternately, a threshold of stone that goes with the tile might be nice. This used to be common at the door of tiled bathrooms. A single strip of marble or such. Obviously you won’t find a single strip to cover that length, but several long pieces might work out nicely. You will need a really stiff floor for that to work. Otherwise the stone will break.

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    We quit spec'ing stone thresholds years ago. They are cheap, but they break. We use solid surface material now- Corian is a brand of solid surface.

    If you go the "extend the tile" route, look for Schluter trim. Good tile man should know the product
    For Floors | Profiles | schluter.com

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  24. #16
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    Aluminum diamond plate ?

    anodized dark brown ?

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    I would make it from a dark wood like walnut or mahogany. Make it so dark it is obvious you did not try to match colors. Brass, bronze, copper might look good. How about make it like the famous tulip wood car with copper nails showing.
    Some would make it from plexiglass and embed leds in it.
    Bill D

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill D View Post
    Some would make it from plexiglass and embed leds in it.
    Bill D
    That would go well, if the room had a "brass Pole" in the center of it....
    along with a "mirror ball"....

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    Quote Originally Posted by digger doug View Post
    That would go well, if the room had a "brass Pole" in the center of it....
    along with a "mirror ball"....
    Make it hollow from clear plexi and put goldfish and water inside.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill D View Post
    Make it hollow from clear plexi and put goldfish and water inside.
    Now your into "Cover plate for the joint down the middle of your double wide" territory...


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