OT Old School One Man Brake Bleeding Kit - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    I'm really just looking for a link for some tiny bulkhead barb fittings and a tiny flow indicator so I can jazz my pickle jar up. I'm well aware that all this is unnecessary.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Leadfootin View Post
    Just be careful that on the return pedal stroke air is not pulled back in at the bleeder screw threads.
    When I have used the vacuum system I unscrew the bleeder screw and apply a dab of thickest grease at hand to the threads. Helps a ton with the air leakage, even though some air leaking trough the bleeder screw thread doesn't matter when you use vacuum bleeder.

    If using pressure system don't apply to too much pressure to reservoir. (no personal experience, just heard from "friend")

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    I made a brake flusher/bleeder from a new 1 gal hand pump garden sprayer. Cut the handle off and replaced with a quick connect and pressure gauge. Male qc on resivoir cap. Put 2 large brake fluid in pump sprayer, pump to 10 psi, and flush thru wheel bleeders. No worries about master cylinder running dry while bleeding.

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  5. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by rmcphearson View Post
    I'm really just looking for a link for some tiny bulkhead barb fittings and a tiny flow indicator so I can jazz my pickle jar up. I'm well aware that all this is unnecessary.
    Like this? Alphacool Eisfluegel flow indicator 6-11 mm | Flow indicator | Monitoring | Water cooling | Aquatuning United Kingdom


    Or this? teco-flow-indicator 3022XX00 @ Fish Tanks Direct

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  7. #25
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    Over the years, I have tried every product and contraption to bleed the brakes on our vehicles.
    I'm one of those nuts that changes the fluid every year.
    Believe it or not, the best ever was our 1985 300SD.
    Changing the fluid every year, the original m/cyl lasted 34 years, almost 400k miles, had to change it out last year.
    Almost sent a letter to Mercedes Benz to complain about the poor durability....
    Anyway, after the kids grew up and moved away, I lost my pedal pumpers.
    As I say, tried lots of things, this system is amazing, easy, and lets me to the job w/o help.
    Even makes enough pressure to bleed through the ABS valves!

    crazy internet, here is the link direct to the mfg. site:

    0250 Universal Bleeder Kit - Motive Products
    Last edited by fish123; 03-11-2019 at 06:57 AM.

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    I clicked the link below and some website is trying to make me accept cookies. Screw that. Is that spam. There isn't anybody cramming cookies down my throat to look at a link. Not without milk.

    Below is what I got. I did not accept.


    VigLink cookie policy: We and our partners use technology such as cookies on our site to personalize content, provide social media features, and analyze our traffic. Visit our Privacy Policy for more information on our data collection practices. By clicking Accept, you consent to the use of this technology across our website. Privacy Policy

    Edit: I just called summit racing. I said that I just tried to look at a link to one of their products and it wouldn't let me look at the product without accepting cookies that follow me around like a dog polluting my computer. I will no longer use summit racing.
    And I won't. BS

  9. #27
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    Worked for me, It was odd that it took me to a page that, when you got there had to click on the summit logo to get to the real page.

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  11. #28
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    I use a short glass jar and a wooden clothes pin. Short jar is less likely to tip. the clothes pin keeps the hose in place. Use the rope notch so the hose is not pinched shut. Or wire on a weight so the hose stays submerged. Aquarium air stuff is a good first step
    Bill D

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  13. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill D View Post
    I use a short glass jar and a wooden clothes pin. Short jar is less likely to tip. the clothes pin keeps the hose in place. Use the rope notch so the hose is not pinched shut. Or wire on a weight so the hose stays submerged. Aquarium air stuff is a good first step
    Bill D
    I get a couple of nuts that the hose will snugly fit inside to weight down the hose if it wants to curl up.

  14. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Leadfootin View Post
    Just be careful that on the return pedal stroke air is not pulled back in at the bleeder screw threads.
    When I used to doo brakes, I would take the bleeder screw out, clean
    it off, and put a glob of grease on the threads to seal it up.

    I used an old quart mason jar, drill 2 holes in the top for barbs.

  15. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by MattiJ View Post
    If using pressure system don't apply to too much pressure to reservoir. (no personal experience, just heard from "friend")
    fwiw some systems require pressure bleeding at a minimum of 30psi

  16. #32
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    Motive power bleeder here.
    Particularly useful on Volvo 240 that have three circuits and the order matters.

  17. #33
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    When I did a bit on cars about 15 years ago we had two guys, one pumping the pedal and one cracking the nipple. I remember using a pressurised bleeder occasionally, was a one man job but some systems seem to bleed faster than others. Definitely remember the day when the fecker popped off and put brake fluid all over the place! Prolly user error lol.
    Relatively recently I did cylinders and linings on the back of my old D series. I bought a cheapo vacuum bleeder and it worked a treat, sucks air in around the bleed pipe and nipple but is no big deal. Only way you can mess up with it is run the brake reservoir run dry.
    Feel like a numpty on the spanners now, got to get my hands dirty more often lol.

  18. #34
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    There is no correct way. MY OPINION IS THIS. Whenever a new model car is first run thru the assembly line,there is a big gathering of so called engineers and technitions,trying to figure out why "we cant get the brakes to bleed"Almost every factory manual will have its own special order or procedure. Edwin Dirnbeck

  19. #35
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    I’ve watched a factory fill on the assembly line. They hook an adapter to the MC that has a vacuum source and a fluid reservoir. After a vacuum level is reached, they valve off the vacuum generator and allow the vacuum in the brake system to pull in the brake fluid. Watched it for a while and it must be well tuned to work because I saw no remedial work done on the cars to have a good pedal.
    One thing I learned in 40+ years swinging wrenches was that a maniac helper thad pumps the brakes like a drummer pounding a base drum kicker pedal can ruin your day by aerating the fluid. Nice slow strokes with a delay at the release position allow the fill ports in the MC to fill the cylinder and it will bleed without introducing air at the source. I used to call out the pedal stroke. NO PUMPING... just up and down and hold it.Up and wait a few, then down and hold to crack and tighten the bleeder screw. Repeat as necessary.
    Joe

  20. #36
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    I got the fittings and the flow indicator from McMaster. I couldn't get the indicator to work but the fittings worked out great. I did another brake job the other evening and noticed that the key for me is to have a couple of reducer barbs so I can use tight fitting rubber hoses on the bleeder screws and then transition them to clear tube. Using clear (not very pliable and tight fitting) tube on the short bleed screws doesn't work worth a crap sometimes.


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