OT Qestions about tracked snowblower - Page 2
Close
Login to Your Account
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 21 to 40 of 48
  1. #21
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    14,274
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Scottl View Post
    I think most of them might not put the operator in the right position with a snowblower and a simple one would be easy to make. Could even start with a cheap trailer dolly.
    Yes, your posting started me thinking down that road.

    Taller, almost standing up.

    Probably have to step on foot pegs to get on to seat.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Flushing/Flint, Michigan
    Posts
    7,500
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    371
    Likes (Received)
    6278

    Default

    People are talking 3 to 4K snowblowers.
    Here you can buy a rotted out, dead to the road truck with a plow for that money.
    No plates, no insurance, just mine. And more fun, easy to work, heat and tunes in the cab and in real snow you will go clear all the neighbors just for shits and giggles.
    Hard to know when to stop with such a beater..
    It's actually fun time and you want big snow. It is sort of play time if you have such toys.
    Walk behind snowblowers no matter the size suck for fun and yes I do this and have three.
    Problem with a winter plow truck may be where to park the darn thing off seasons as they are not small and don't fit in a home depot shed.
    Moving snow and clearing can actually be a good and enjoyable time.
    Bob

  3. Likes TeachMePlease liked this post
  4. #23
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    14,274
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by CarbideBob View Post
    People are talking 3 to 4K snowblowers.
    Here you can buy a rotted out, dead to the road truck with a plow for that money.
    No plates, no insurance, just mine. And more fun, easy to work, heat and tunes in the cab and in real snow you will go clear all the neighbors just for shits and giggles.
    Hard to know when to stop with such a beater..
    It's actually fun time and you want big snow. It is sort of play time if you have such toys.
    Bob
    Might not blend in well to the OP's neighborhood.

  5. #24
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Michigan
    Posts
    440
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    82
    Likes (Received)
    226

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by digger doug View Post
    Might not blend in well to the OP's neighborhood.
    Guess the neighbors should have helped him out sooner, eh?

  6. #25
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Madera county california usa
    Posts
    2,384
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    21
    Likes (Received)
    589

    Default

    Dienes z mowers also have snow blower attachment.



    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G930A using Tapatalk

  7. #26
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Northern Illinois
    Posts
    2,923
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1617
    Likes (Received)
    1741

    Default

    Thanks guys, I've just read through all the responses. Doesn't look like the tracked machine solves the problem.

    First off, who said anything about retired? I'm still working. Doesn't hurt that I'm part owner, so there are no arguments about reasonable accommodation, and there are still a few things I want to build before I'm done. The other thing is SWMBO is retired, and has committed herself to watching grandkids. That's her life, and she wouldn't miss it for the world. That means she has to be on the road by 6:00 AM most mornings. I doubt I can find a high school kid that will show up reliably at 5:00 AM when needed. Most high school kids likely think there is an app for their phone that deals with snow.

    We've talked about finding someone to plow, but I've had the drive plowed by pick-up trucks before, and there isn't any room by the house and garage to push snow. It's a long pull to drag it back where the plow can get on the proper side of it. Best bet would be someone who plows with a skid steer, but I haven't found anyone out here that does.

    The sulky idea is interesting, in fact I ran into this video on youtube that illustrates the idea:

    I could deal with that, given a more heavily constructed trailer, because I have the upper body strength to muscle the snow blower around. The one problem I see is the snow blowers tendency to try to climb frozen plow banks. Maybe teeth, like bucket teeth, on the front of the blower housing would help, kind of like the teeth they jury-rigged on the Sherman tanks to make them push through the hedgerows of Normandy.

    The next problem is one of negotiation; SWMBO insists I'm not doing the snow any longer, which means it must be something she can handle, and she barely weighs a hundred pounds.

    I think at this point I need to be looking at a snow blower attachment for the Cub Cadet lawn tractor, or a new lawn tractor altogether.

    Dennis

  8. Likes Scottl, TDegenhart liked this post
  9. #27
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Hillsboro, New Hampshire
    Posts
    6,981
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1644
    Likes (Received)
    4818

    Default

    If you can find a 4-WD lawn tractor with auger, that might be the ticket. Maybe 2-WD would work OK, but you might be unloading the rear wheels with the weight of attachments.

    Or just drive backwards. That would do you neck in pretty quick...

  10. #28
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Milwaukee,WI
    Posts
    1,262
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    6916
    Likes (Received)
    987

    Default

    Several years ago I hurt my back and had to find a better way to clear my 300 foot long driveway along with the 30 foot wide approach to my home garage and the 80 foot wide approach to my shop. My wife starts work at 3 am so it is hard to find someone to plow. I have a 4wd pickup but when you only use the plow occasionally everything goes wrong and messing with them is physically hard. I have a 2wd Case tractor with a 48" blower but it doesn't work very good on the steep hill in the beginning of the drive. The best solution I found was a Toro powermax snowblower with manual power steering. It has triggers on the bottom of the handgrips that you depress to make it turn without any effort from the operator. It takes me a little over an hour to clean everything and I have no back pain when I am done.

  11. #29
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    peekskill, NY
    Posts
    24,178
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    4391

    Default

    [QUOTE=Modelman;3401121
    The one problem I see is the snow blowers tendency to try to climb frozen plow banks.
    Dennis[/QUOTE]

    My honda does that a bit, now that I've worn the teeth off the augers. But when it had teeth there, all I had
    to do was set the hydrostatic drive on 'real slow' and it would munch its way into any kind of snowbank. Basically
    the biggest snowcone machine ever. Yep, even the packed up frozen plow leavings.

  12. #30
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Hillsboro, New Hampshire
    Posts
    6,981
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1644
    Likes (Received)
    4818

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jim rozen View Post
    My honda does that a bit, now that I've worn the teeth off the augers.
    Can you "re-gash" them with an angle grinder?

  13. #31
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    14,274
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Glug View Post
    Guess the neighbors should have helped him out sooner, eh?
    "Suburbia" is filled with the most Hypocritikal, condescending, back stabbing, Vermin on the planet.
    YouTube
    YouTube

    Can't get out and clean that drive and side walk in under 20 minutes after the snowstorm ?
    Out comes the HOA paperwork.....

  14. #32
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    14,274
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Milland View Post

    Or just drive backwards. That would do you neck in pretty quick...
    Get's old real fast...even with a cab and reclined car seat.....
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails pict0011-2-.jpg  

  15. Likes TeachMePlease liked this post
  16. #33
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Eastern Massachusetts, USA
    Posts
    3,858
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    4236
    Likes (Received)
    4067

    Default

    Modelman,

    That video you posted is exactly what I was proposing, except of steel instead of wood.

    What I see in that video disturbs me. I note the tendency of the snow blower to "wheelie" when he engages the drive and that has to chafe at the wooden "hitch", probably eventually leading to sudden failure.

    The type of hitch connection on the portable trap machines is 2" square tubing with steel plates welded on. The hitch pin goes through 5/8 holes in the plates and the drawbar on the towing device (usually a tractor or ATV). It is a very strong attachment and meant for moving these rather expensive machines over unpaved surfaces.

    In short, while I admire that man's ingenuity, I seriously question the quality of construction and suspect he may someday have a serious accident with that rig.

  17. #34
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    14,274
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Scottl View Post
    Modelman,

    That video you posted is exactly what I was proposing, except of steel instead of wood.

    What I see in that video disturbs me. I note the tendency of the snow blower to "wheelie" when he engages the drive and that has to chafe at the wooden "hitch", probably eventually leading to sudden failure.

    The type of hitch connection on the portable trap machines is 2" square tubing with steel plates welded on. The hitch pin goes through 5/8 holes in the plates and the drawbar on the towing device (usually a tractor or ATV). It is a very strong attachment and meant for moving these rather expensive machines over unpaved surfaces.

    In short, while I admire that man's ingenuity, I seriously question the quality of construction and suspect he may someday have a serious accident with that rig.
    Yup, your right.

    Too many variables, to many ways to get injured.

    I revert back to my original suggestion, "hire it out".

    Or heat the driveway.....and NOT with a can of gas and a match....

  18. #35
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Eastern Massachusetts, USA
    Posts
    3,858
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    4236
    Likes (Received)
    4067

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by digger doug View Post
    Yup, your right.

    Too many variables, to many ways to get injured.

    I revert back to my original suggestion, "hire it out".

    Or heat the driveway.....and NOT with a can of gas and a match....
    Damn! Is THAT why my improvised method made such a mess?

  19. #36
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    14,274
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Scottl View Post
    Damn! Is THAT why my improvised method made such a mess?
    You've got to the diesel-to-gas ratio just right, so it will light off, and yet linger to do the melting properly, but not run down the street....ask Thermite.

  20. Likes TeachMePlease liked this post
  21. #37
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    1,047
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    14
    Likes (Received)
    353

    Default

    [QUOTE=Modelman;3401121
    The one problem I see is the snow blowers tendency to try to climb frozen plow banks.
    Dennis[/QUOTE]

    That's true of the wheeled versions, and that's exactly why I switched to a tracked version. As jim rozen pointed out with the tracked version you can set the hydrostatic transmission speed to nearly 0 mph and chew your way through the frozen pile. In addition you can set the auger height to peel off snow or ice in layers if you choose to.

    As for plowing with a tractor or truck it's fine the first storm, but you'd better push it back far enough that it doesn't need to be moved for the rest of the season. Once the pile warms and freezes a few times there's no moving it. A couple other drawbacks are that as the pile grows it gets harder and harder to see over. Also if you're pushing the snow onto the lawn you have to be careful not to peel up the sod.

    I used a JD445 with a rear facing plow for 1 season. Besides having to plow snow quite a way onto the lawn going backward gets old real quick. In our case all the snow has to be pushed or blown to one side since we have a drive parallel to the neighbors only a couple feet away. In some years plowing would leave an 8' high bank on one side of the drive. At least when blowing the snow is spread over the entire lawn making it easier to see traffic on both sides.

    From time to time I have used my small home made (CadTrac) end loader to move snow or ice piles from the drive apron. It was used more often when I was using the 824 blower to clear the drive. Now that I use the tracked model it doesn't get used nearly as often.

    Here are a couple pictures of the loader and the 824 sitting in the garage after a particularly heavy snow storm. Note the "plow is actually a Woods rear scraper blade with a home made mount to the loader. As a side note the blower I keep referring to as the 824 is the one in the picture.

    While it clearly states 824 on the plate between the handle bars it's technically a model 924 as far as parts and service are concerned. The first digit 8 on the plate refers to the size of the engine (8 hp) while the 24 refers to the width (24") of the auger housing. They also made a model ST 824, but I'm not sure of the differences between the two.

    dcp00725.jpg dcp00729.jpg

  22. Likes digger doug liked this post
  23. #38
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Modesto, CA USA
    Posts
    6,647
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    1086

    Default

    Here is a link to a real snowblower on tracks. One pass would clear your driveway. Note that it has to have a locomotive or two to push it. It has no traction motors. Of course you have to have tracks in the driveway first and they are a trip hazard in summer. How many feet of snow do you get in a good storm?
    Bill D
    YouTube

  24. #39
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    14,274
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bill D View Post
    Here is a link to a real snowblower on tracks. One pass would clear your driveway. Note that it has to have a locomotive or two to push it. It has no traction motors. Of course you have to have tracks in the driveway first and they are a trip hazard in summer. How many feet of snow do you get in a good storm?
    Bill D
    YouTube
    Bill, Bill, Bill.....Think "Practical"....

    No rails needed, no loco needed, and the factory is just north of the Op.
    Scoot up the expressway, and drive one home today !:
    H-Series | Snow Removal | Oshkosh Airport Products

  25. #40
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Geneva Illinois USA
    Posts
    5,952
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2461
    Likes (Received)
    2313

    Default

    Modelman, what city do you call home. Second, how much money are you willing to spend?

    Tom


Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •