OT- Railroad Train Stopping Distance. - Page 4
Close
Login to Your Account
Page 4 of 6 FirstFirst ... 23456 LastLast
Results 61 to 80 of 107
  1. #61
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Denver, CO USA
    Posts
    11,532
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    45
    Likes (Received)
    5291

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by cnctoolcat View Post
    Freight locomotives in North America are geared for a maximum top speed of 70 mph. This gearing allows the best performance between low-speed pulling power and top speed.

    It's interesting that each axle only has one electric traction motor, so there are only two gears - one on the motor and one on the axle.

    Of course passenger trains are much shorter and lighter, and thus are geared for higher speeds.

    BNSF and UP run their double-stack container trains at full throttle in much of the territory out West - called throttle position "Run 8". Even at that, many of the trains are so long and heavy they can't get up to 70mph.

    Railroad territory in much of the East is so hilly and curvy, that a locomotive's top speed is never tested.

    ToolCat
    As long as we have the chance to talk tech...
    The big fans on top of trains are cooling for the braking resistors of the drive line...GE is working on capturing some of that burned fuel.

  2. #62
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Modesto, CA USA
    Posts
    5,869
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    880

    Default

    The big fans on top of trains are cooling for the braking resistors of the drive line...GE is working on capturing some of that burned fuel.[/QUOTE]

    On an electric train they back feed that power into the overhead wires.
    Bill D

  3. Likes adama liked this post
  4. #63
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Vista, CA
    Posts
    965
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    232
    Likes (Received)
    266

    Default

    They don't stop very fast do they.


  5. #64
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    uk
    Posts
    12,800
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    3695
    Likes (Received)
    5794

    Default

    Try it with a full one!!

  6. Likes Bobw liked this post
  7. #65
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Oklahoma City, OK
    Posts
    3,336
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    580
    Likes (Received)
    1468

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by digger doug View Post
    They used FOOTBALL FIELDS in the video, apparently you've proven that even
    that much dumbing down doesn't work.....Jesus.
    I loathe the tendency to describe lengths in 'football fields'.

  8. #66
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Denver, CO USA
    Posts
    11,532
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    45
    Likes (Received)
    5291

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bill D View Post
    The big fans on top of trains are cooling for the braking resistors of the drive line...GE is working on capturing some of that burned fuel.
    On an electric train they back feed that power into the overhead wires.
    Bill D[/QUOTE]

    Yeah...we don't have that for heavy rail here.

  9. #67
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Denver, CO USA
    Posts
    11,532
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    45
    Likes (Received)
    5291

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by adama View Post
    Try it with a full one!!
    As I said. They are forces of nature.

  10. #68
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    11,012
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    17949
    Likes (Received)
    5818

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Cole2534 View Post
    I loathe the tendency to describe lengths in 'football fields'.
    I doo too...the point was "operation Lifesaver" had dumbbed it down as much as possible.

  11. #69
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Hatch, NM Chile capital of the WORLD
    Posts
    8,665
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    12413
    Likes (Received)
    9889

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Cole2534 View Post
    I loathe the tendency to describe lengths in 'football fields'.
    But just think how much more math savy football fans would be....

    Its not 3rd and 5, its "3rd and 1/20 of a football field".

    Or instead of 4th and inches, its "4th and 1/1800th of a football field"..

    Actually a football field wouldn't be a bad middle measurement, between feet and miles,
    of course the English and the Australians would screw that all up because they don't know
    what a foot ball field is, and the Canadians would mess it up because they don't how long a
    football field is supposed to be.

    And then we could have a Long Football Field, end of endzone to end of endzone of 120 yards, and
    make the imperial system that much more confusing.

  12. Likes digger doug, Cole2534 liked this post
  13. #70
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Illinois
    Posts
    143
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    42
    Likes (Received)
    43

    Default

    I don't remember how I heard this, but I was once told that if the person operating the train sees the possibility of killing someone, they are encouraged to attempt to decelerate the train and look away and cover their ears. I suppose this would be to avoid having any vivid memories of the actual incident, only before and after.

    I don't know what the controls of a train look like and am curious if one could actually remove their hands from the controls to cover their ears. Also, how loud is it when at the controls of a train? If it is really loud, presumably they might be wearing hearing protection anyway.

  14. #71
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    uk
    Posts
    12,800
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    3695
    Likes (Received)
    5794

    Default

    ^ Alternatively maybe if every gory crash was left there for say 48 hours before wash down a few more people would see the aftermath and thing a bit more vividly about things.

    The typically human is rapidly losing the links between cause and effect and the basic survival instincts and realities of live are all neatly being swept up way to fast.

    You want people to grasp danger it has to be vivid enough to leave a imprint in the mind, its how humans work, if you do something and it hurts you don't tend to do it again, were rapidly losing this connection to reality, if the real world has not more of a impact than the virtual one its a slippery slope.

  15. #72
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    11,012
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    17949
    Likes (Received)
    5818

    Default

    I think you-toob has many "Dash Cam" videos of what your looking for.
    TRAIN CRASH Compilation #1 || Trains vs Cars, Trains vs Trucks - YouTube

  16. #73
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Oklahoma City, OK
    Posts
    3,336
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    580
    Likes (Received)
    1468

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by digger doug View Post
    I doo too...the point was "operation Lifesaver" had dumbbed it down as much as possible.
    Ya I know, but it just grinds my brain to hear something described in 'football fields'.

    Sent from my SM-G930R4 using Tapatalk

  17. #74
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Webster Groves, MO
    Posts
    6,371
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1548
    Likes (Received)
    2638

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bill D View Post
    The big fans on top of trains are cooling for the braking resistors of the drive line...GE is working on capturing some of that burned fuel.
    On an electric train they back feed that power into the overhead wires.
    Bill D[/QUOTE]

    I no longer get information about GE locomotives since they closed the St. Louis and Minneapolis electronic shops. The TV ads for the Evolution series said they were feeding braking power into batteries. They would have to be some monstrous batteries. The last I heard, the railroads were getting disillusioned with the Evolution series due to semiconductor failures. I made thousands of reverser and braking switch contacts for GE dash 7 and 8 locomotives. The ones to the braking grids were as big as the running ones. I reconditioned an armature for one of the fans and afterwards told the shop that they had established the absolute maximum armature size and weight for my shop to handle.

    Wiki says the dash 8s were the first to have microprocessor controls. The first dash 8s ate braking switch and reverser contacts three times a day. We would get in crates of burned contacts. Finally they figured out that the program had a glitch that would open them under power. The normal procedure was to shut the generator down, switch the reverser and bring the power back up. When you open a contact carrying 600 hp, DC, without an arc chute or blowout coil, things commence to happen, all bad. They finally got it figured out and things quieted down.

    Bill

  18. Likes cnctoolcat, JoeE. liked this post
  19. #75
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    ch
    Posts
    2,048
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    187
    Likes (Received)
    269

    Default

    dont trains have emergency brakes? pads that ride just above the tracks and get pushed down? brake lining on steel is about 0.5 fc, so to not lift the train maybe 0.25 efectively? meaning a 0.25 g deceleration. then there is sand being sprinkled on the tracks before the pad.

  20. #76
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    11,012
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    17949
    Likes (Received)
    5818

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by dian View Post
    dont trains have emergency brakes? pads that ride just above the tracks and get pushed down? brake lining on steel is about 0.5 fc, so to not lift the train maybe 0.25 efectively? meaning a 0.25 g deceleration. then there is sand being sprinkled on the tracks before the pad.
    NO to the brakes.

    Sand is used, but it's only available on the engine, not all those cars.

  21. #77
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Modesto, CA USA
    Posts
    5,869
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    880

    Default

    Street cars do have those track brakes. They use wooden pads. mainline trains do not.
    Bill D

  22. #78
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Country
    CHINA
    Posts
    1,812
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    1127

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by dian View Post
    dont trains have emergency brakes? pads that ride just above the tracks and get pushed down?
    thanks, that made me laugh. Cable cars have that. They don't work very well

  23. #79
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Webster Groves, MO
    Posts
    6,371
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1548
    Likes (Received)
    2638

    Default

    The St. Louis street cars had brake pads. Some say they were magnetically operated, which would mean that they did not tend to lift the car. Why the city took out streetcars is a subject of debate. One version is that GM paid off city officials to sell busses. Another story is that the brake pads wore the rails coming up to each stop to the point that the cost of replacing rails would be excessive. I remember them. they were about 3 feet long and moved maybe 1/2 inch. The "Big Reds" had them but I don't recall whether the older cars did. I rode streetcars a lot as a kid and much preferred them to busses.

    Bill

  24. #80
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Country
    CHINA
    Posts
    1,812
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    1127

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 9100 View Post
    The St. Louis street cars had brake pads.
    Railroad passenger cars have disk brakes ... big ones.

    I rode streetcars a lot as a kid and much preferred them to busses
    Cable cars are good, too Or they were before they became a tourist attraction. But those wood brakes don't exactly give Formula One stopping power ...


Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
2