OT Recommend a commuter motorcycle please - Page 7
Close
Login to Your Account
Page 7 of 8 FirstFirst ... 5678 LastLast
Results 121 to 140 of 154
  1. #121
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Oregon
    Posts
    2,548
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    452
    Likes (Received)
    1811

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by TeachMePlease View Post
    The lane splitting/filtering thing is pretty much common everywhere but the US. It's safer for motorcyclists, and shown to reduce congestion... But everyone who doesn't ride is so scared of what they don't understand that it's illegal everywhere but California. Huh, California got a law right, for once.
    In Oregon lane splitting is still illegal, but everyone thinks it's legal. So it's normal for motorcycles to split the traffic in rush hour.

    In addition to your list I will add:

    Keep your feet on the pegs when the bike is moving.
    The guys that really want to kill you are: the car next to you on the freeway, and the one in the left turn lane across the intersection from you.

    Everyone is trying to kill you, but those 2 guys are really trying.

  2. Likes TeachMePlease, JohnEvans liked this post
  3. #122
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    peekskill, NY
    Posts
    24,364
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    4475

    Default

    So you are in NJ, as you know lane splitting is illegal in NJ. Don't do that. Nuf said.

    As a NJ rider you will be exposed to weather of various types as you go back and forth to work.
    Be sure the tires on the bike are better than 80 percent all the time. Be sure the lights and
    brakes are all perfect.

    Wear the gear. It works. Boots, jacket, full face helmet, gloves. Better if you do this a lot is a
    one-piece riding suit. Aerostich roadcrafter comes to mind. Others are good too.

    Men's Roadcrafter Classic One Piece Suit - One Piece Suits - Motorcycle Suits :: Aerostich Motorcycle Jackets, Suits, Clothing, & Gear

    Weather comes in all forms. If you find the confluence where it is a) cold b) raining c) dark and you are
    d) tired out, and e) under-dressed then MAKE THE CALL and get the ride home, or get the ride from a co-worker.
    Things go sideways when all the factors stack up.

    Get a good doppler radar site linked and keep an eye on it.

    NWS Enhanced Radar Mosaic: Northeast Sector Loop

    The NOAA one is good. Government is here to help you, use it.

    Limited access highway travel is safer than secondary roads. See left turner problems above

    Over half the bike crashes are single vehicle accidents. Don't do stupid shit.

    See you on the road!

  4. #123
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Phoenix,AZ
    Posts
    1,768
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2692
    Likes (Received)
    444

    Default

    My fav commuter bikes when that was how I got to work in the 70s and early 80s were
    BSA A10 650 twin
    BSA Goldstar 500 GP carb and all
    Velocette Venmon 500 clubman
    Vincent Black Shadow 1000
    Ariel MK2 Sq 4 1000.
    That's what I rode depending on my mood rain or shine! Of course here in Phoenix in the summer heat prostration was the next biggest hazard after the idiots !
    Fast forward to the 90s and then it was BMW's R-60,R-50,R69S and R69S with sidecar.
    You could probably say I had collector-ites ! LOL
    Me with part of the collection in 82-83
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails bikes-001.jpg  
    Last edited by JohnEvans; 10-29-2019 at 01:03 AM.

  5. Likes lastrada, DrHook liked this post
  6. #124
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    jacksonville,fl.
    Posts
    1,099
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    925
    Likes (Received)
    359

    Default

    John Evens,you mentioned you had an Ariel Sq 4.My dad had one that I learned to ride when I was 10/11 years old.I had a low enough seat height to be manageable.Had an Indian Arrow at about the same time.

  7. #125
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Phoenix,AZ
    Posts
    1,768
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2692
    Likes (Received)
    444

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ratbldr427 View Post
    John Evens,you mentioned you had an Ariel Sq 4.My dad had one that I learned to ride when I was 10/11 years old.I had a low enough seat height to be manageable.Had an Indian Arrow at about the same time.
    Added a picture

  8. #126
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Country
    AUSTRALIA
    Posts
    2,073
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    9
    Likes (Received)
    626

    Default

    Sheesh ,didnt say you had them all at the same time......I see a Vincent Series C Shadow,DBD Goldstar,Velo Thruxton,or at lest a Venom Clubman,and a late Mk II Sq 4.

  9. #127
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    pacific northwest
    Posts
    992
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    6
    Likes (Received)
    199

    Default

    Get a small car. You could by a nice used little Miata, top down on nice days, for no more than an inexpensive MC. good MPG, and it will run forever.

    I have been riding bikes for 50 years. It ain't getting any better out there- well, the cars are safer, but the drivers suck. My next door neighbor saved a lot of money and time using a bike to commute.First on, first off on the ferry. He is dead now. Wife and two young boys. Of any time to ride, the commute is THE WORST- nobody is thinking about where and what they are doing, their brains are either in the office already, or home already- the pinnacle of distracted driving.

  10. #128
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Phoenix,AZ
    Posts
    1,768
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2692
    Likes (Received)
    444

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by john.k View Post
    Sheesh ,didnt say you had them all at the same time......I see a Vincent Series C Shadow,DBD Goldstar,Velo Thruxton,or at lest a Venom Clubman,and a late Mk II Sq 4.
    And a 51 BSA A7-58 A10 -and a 38 Velo KSS .The 38 Velo was a Brit garden shed special-tels,swing arm and all.And if I remember right a Velo 53 MAC . You are right the Venom was in Clubman trim rear sets but more normal bars. Like I said I have a collection problem. In BMW Earls fork period there was 9 of them in the garage all rideable, 2 with chairs.Just remembered a 51 Ariel Mk1 Sq 4 also [that one did NOT like Phoenix in the summer!]
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails bikes-002.jpg  

  11. Likes DrHook, lastrada liked this post
  12. #129
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    New Jersey
    Posts
    443
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1
    Likes (Received)
    103

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by g-coder05 View Post
    I'm a little late to the party here but I have a fleet of scooters I rent out over here and the new Yamaha Aerox by far to me is the best bang for the buck. I just bought a 2019 loaded with ABS, Key less start, Fuel injected liquid cooled 155 cc out the door with 3 year engine warranty for $2000. Its got 140/70-14 fat tires with all digital dash (Distance to go, average econ, all that other stuff) and a quick detach 42 liter cargo box on the back. Super comfortable and easy to ride, automatic, tops out at about 120-125 MPH (Scary on a scooter) and best of all is my average in town miles is 144.2 per gallon.

    On the weekends its nothing for me to take a ride up the coastline and run 200 miles nonstop and still not have a chapped ass. Their fun to ride and yeah the big bikes may give you a razzin but it's all in fun.....

    Attachment 268337Attachment 268338Attachment 268339
    Wow, that is a lot of bang for the buck! Something for me to keep in mind.

  13. #130
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    New Jersey
    Posts
    443
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1
    Likes (Received)
    103

    Default

    Well I've been taking this bike the 8 miles to work lately. It was 18 degrees F yesterday and 19 today. The only problem (other than stopping 5 feet from a deer jumping in front of me) was my gloves didn't quite cut it. Yesterday my hands froze and I didn't have a problem moving them but they hurt like hell thawing out. Today by the time I got near the shop I could barely squeeze the levers but they didn't hurt much thawing out. I guess I got used to the thawing out deal. Just haven't had time to buy better gloves. I think I will make time tonight! On a positive note, I did not have any trouble staying awake.

    The stock side view mirror gives me an excellent view of my elbow but I couldn't see a Mac truck if it was 2 feet behind me. Even the aftermarket mirror I mounted a few inches higher isn't quite high enough. I don't understand what good the stock mirror is.

    Cheers

  14. #131
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    15,068
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by rmcphearson View Post
    Well I've been taking this bike the 8 miles to work lately. It was 18 degrees F yesterday and 19 today. The only problem (other than stopping 5 feet from a deer jumping in front of me) was my gloves didn't quite cut it. Yesterday my hands froze and I didn't have a problem moving them but they hurt like hell thawing out. Today by the time I got near the shop I could barely squeeze the levers but they didn't hurt much thawing out. I guess I got used to the thawing out deal. Just haven't had time to buy better gloves. I think I will make time tonight! On a positive note, I did not have any trouble staying awake.

    The stock side view mirror gives me an excellent view of my elbow but I couldn't see a Mac truck if it was 2 feet behind me. Even the aftermarket mirror I mounted a few inches higher isn't quite high enough. I don't understand what good the stock mirror is.

    Cheers
    They make electrically heat gloves and handgrips for sleds....if your leetle engine can keep the alternator spinning.

    FWIW I can't see any insurance company covering a 2 wheeled vehicle when temps are below 32f.
    You might have just entered a loophole with this ride.

  15. #132
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Flushing/Flint, Michigan
    Posts
    7,776
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    390
    Likes (Received)
    6470

    Default

    Heated grips may bake the underside of your hand while the outside still freezes.
    They do help but sometimes get too hot so make sure you get adjustable ones.
    Handguards like these keep the wind off of your hands and make a huge difference. Added plus in the summer and trail riding they keep the tree branches from nailing your knuckles.
    https://www.amazon.com/Best-Sellers-...tive/404715011
    Bob

  16. #133
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    peekskill, NY
    Posts
    24,364
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    4475

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by rmcphearson View Post
    Well I've been taking this bike the 8 miles to work lately. It was 18 degrees F yesterday and 19 today. The only problem (other than stopping 5 feet from a deer jumping in front of me) was my gloves didn't quite cut it. Yesterday my hands froze and I didn't have a problem moving them but they hurt like hell thawing out. Today by the time I got near the shop I could barely squeeze the levers but they didn't hurt much thawing out. I guess I got used to the thawing out deal. Just haven't had time to buy better gloves. I think I will make time tonight! On a positive note, I did not have any trouble staying awake.

    The stock side view mirror gives me an excellent view of my elbow but I couldn't see a Mac truck if it was 2 feet behind me. Even the aftermarket mirror I mounted a few inches higher isn't quite high enough. I don't understand what good the stock mirror is.

    Cheers
    Napoleon bar-end mirrors. Use those. They provide a decent view of something other than your elbow.

    Hot-Hands heater packs. Buy em in bulk from someplace like home depot. They're iron powder and charcoal in a small pouch, the iron oxidizes in air and
    gives a surprising amount of heat. One in each glove, behind your hand. You can store them in a zip lock bag at each end of the trip and they can be used
    for four or five days. Carry a spare set with you. Also get a set of over-gloves, and wear silk liners under those. The heater packs go over the silk and under the
    over=gloves. Most times for me the real problem is the gloves restrict blood circulation and that's what chills my hands. Also stay away from coffee, it's
    a vasoconstrictor and will also chill your hands.

    My cut-off is 20F at my house in the morning, below that I four-wheel it. The electric gloves permit lower temperature riding but after a while it just takes
    too long to put all the riding gear on.

  17. #134
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Flushing/Flint, Michigan
    Posts
    7,776
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    390
    Likes (Received)
    6470

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jim rozen View Post
    ....
    My cut-off is 20F at my house in the morning, below that I four-wheel it.
    What do you do when ice racing? Do you have winter tires with sheet metal screws in them?

  18. #135
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Sunny South West Florida, USA
    Posts
    2,802
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    10555
    Likes (Received)
    3212

    Default

    To build on what Bob said, I swear by hippo hands (name brand) style hand/arm shields, like this:

    https://www.amazon.com/s?k=hippo+han...f=nb_sb_noss_2

  19. Likes CarbideBob liked this post
  20. #136
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Tennessee USA
    Posts
    698
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    341
    Likes (Received)
    413

    Default

    Being cold while riding not only makes your hands feel stiff your reaction time is also much slower. Not a good thing when braking conditions are less than optimal. To the above post, the BMW riders used the hippo hands to ride year round in Chicago winters. I now use just a heated vest with a variable control. Heated socks are nice too because a steel toe (shoe) stays cold a long time. The Toys 4 Tots run (Chicago) the first week of December was always my last ride of the year, too much salt to wash off the bike.

  21. #137
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    dexter mich
    Posts
    266
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    10
    Likes (Received)
    62

    Default

    I would make sure what ever you buy has 12 volt electrical system not 6 volt . I say this because I would not recommend commute with out first installing a head light modulator which make the head lamp flicker , you as operator can not perceive it but it is annoying and not able to be ignored by the cell phone using car drivers who are distracted . This can easily save you life . There also is a tail light modulator for tail lamps which might save you from being a sandwich between 2 cars when the cell phone using driver does not leave enough braking distance, think about these words and take head it might save your life . Most accidents are Idiots pulling out in front of you because they were to busy to see you .

  22. #138
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    peekskill, NY
    Posts
    24,364
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    4475

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by CarbideBob View Post
    What do you do when ice racing? Do you have winter tires with sheet metal screws in them?
    Last two times I tried to drive on snow, I fell over. Very embarrassing. No real damage though. So if there's a chance of ice
    on the road, or rain that might linger on as black ice, I four wheel it again. However, not sheet metal screws:

    Self-Tapping Carbide Tire Studs - Tire Studs - For the Bike - A to B :: Aerostich Motorcycle Jackets, Suits, Clothing, & Gear

  23. #139
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    pacific northwest
    Posts
    992
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    6
    Likes (Received)
    199

    Default

    Did not like the Miata idea, eh? OK.

    So you have a bike. Practice. This does not mean ride to work and back , or ride around the area. It means deliberate focused practice.
    find a place you can do maximum effort stops-use that front brake to the point the tire starts to skid. Be prepared to instantly back off the lever. Start slow and wear your gear. Practice braking, swerving, braking- remember that traction pie!

    In this day and age of people constantly looking down at their phones, a FLASHING brake light is a good idea. The human eye is geared to pick up motion. Buy one of the led flashing brake and turn signal units, or get in the habit whenever stopped of flashing the brake light by hand. Stop lights are a dangerous place because it is hard to react to something coming from behind. Been hit once that way. Saw a guy yesterday with his truck rear bumper swiveled under the frame- he was in the left turn lane, some social media freak was texting and drifted into him. Would have killed or maimed a biker.


    Buy David Houghs book, "Proficient Motorcycling".

  24. Likes cnctoolcat liked this post
  25. #140
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    New Jersey
    Posts
    443
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1
    Likes (Received)
    103

    Default

    [QUOTE=

    Also stay away from coffee, it's
    a vasoconstrictor and will also chill your hands.

    [/QUOTE]

    Oh I don't drink coffee. It's a health hazard.


Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •