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  1. #41
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    Sea Foam additive works great, as a preventive and cleaner.
    I adde a strong mixture to a genset that had the blind staggers while running.
    10 minutes or so and it smoothed out.
    Fuel was probably 2 years old.

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  3. #42
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    Not sure on the green crap but the water ethanol separating out corrodes the aluminum carb bowl. Usually i see white gel. Probably alumium hydroxide.

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  5. #43
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    Definitely hate the ethanol gas. I have had plenty of issues with it around here. The formulation of gas is probably considerably different depending on the climate and time of year where it's sold, which could explain some not having so many issues with it.

  6. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by digger doug View Post
    there isn't a "The gas" in the us of a...:
    https://www.api.org/~/media/Files/Po...ements-Map.pdf
    This is a good map, it shows the different fuels used in different states. Looks like 14 different formulas for Mobil alone. Thanks go out to digger for digging this up

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  8. #45
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    Up at least to recently, the EPA has made the St Louis area use a gas additive that is forbidden everywhere else. Go figure.

  9. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by JST View Post
    Up at least to recently, the EPA has made the St Louis area use a gas additive that is forbidden everywhere else. Go figure.
    MBTE ?

    Was used in the northeast, go towards water....so all the leaks near the underground
    tanks filler, it goes into the water table.

  10. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by digger doug View Post
    MBTE ?

    Was used in the northeast, go towards water....so all the leaks near the underground
    tanks filler, it goes into the water table.
    That sounds like it, yes. For some reason we were (are?) required to use a gasoline unlike all other places.

  11. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by JST View Post
    Up at least to recently, the EPA has made the St Louis area use a gas additive that is forbidden everywhere else. Go figure.
    Where do you get such bullshit? The St Louis RFG is used in 5 other areas of the country. MBTE was banned in Missouri in 2005. The RFG was adopted in 1999 so where is this "new" gasoline? See here:
    Missouri

  12. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by tdmidget View Post
    Where do you get such bullshit? The St Louis RFG is used in 5 other areas of the country. MBTE was banned in Missouri in 2005. The RFG was adopted in 1999 so where is this "new" gasoline? See here:
    Missouri
    Now you are annoying me......

    Obviously it is not bullshit....it is out of date info. I said "has made" and as far as I know they DID at one time. That is what was reported locally, in any case. At one point it was blamed for part of the local high gas prices....(they have come way down since, so maybe it was true)

    OK, 2005 is not as "recent" as I thought.... I'll give you that.

    In any case, 5 areas is not exactly universal usage....Minnesota, and some other places also use RFG.... I had found a map, but lost the link. MTBE was used in RFG for a while....you can look it up. And the RFG has mandate areas and "opt-in", This area is an "opt in", or was back in 1999. By now it may be mandated, although I look for that whole issue to be adjusted any day now by the current administration. Seemed like the map showed more than 5.

    "NEW" gas? whatever they sell here.... it don't act like it used to, in a few weeks it smells like dirty water, and does not burn as well as the river in Cleveland Oh used to. (unless you use a stabilizer)

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    Quote Originally Posted by SteveF View Post
    This place is GREAT!!

    I am pulling the carb off the aforementioned generator today and have borrowed a buddy's ultrasonic cleaner but didn't really have a good plan on what to use as a solvent. I'll try the 50/50 mix and see how it works.

    Thanks.

    Steve
    -Just keep an eye on it if using the ultrasonic bath, don't know how that will affect things or not. If a silver stain comes off on your fingers it's past time for removal and a rinse down with water. Do please report your findings (for my knowledge anyway) as I thought it to be a BS prank until I tried it. There may be other purpose formulated chemicals (like the Yamaha one thank you) but what I liked about Pine-Sol was the ready availability at an inexpensive price and less toxic (so was reported..) disposal aspect. Hope this helps someone.

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    The pinesol trick works great. You just have to be careful,with it. To long at to high a concentration will cause its own problems.

    I certainly understand the road tax portion of running 100ll but why do you guys think its illegal to dispense into mobile cans? You can buy it already packaged into 5 gallon cans. At our local airport, most people use cans at the pump. $5 per gallon seems cheap compared to lots of small engine work and possible burned up 2 strokes from them leaning out due to carb problems. We run pro stuff so its not cheap. Running throw away big box store stuff may be a different view.

  15. #52
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    2005? That's like, yesterday as far as I'm concerned. I have underwear older than that. Good underwear.

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    Quote Originally Posted by GregSY View Post
    ....................

    As for driving until your car is on fumes....not a great practice. Of course you risk getting stuck due to unforeseen traffic conditions, but most of all it's bad for the fuel pump. The pump is submerged in gas (on modern cars) which keeps it cool. Running on E negates that effect.
    Well, I've been doing it for 25+ years and usually sell vehicles when getting to the 200K mark. Never replaced a fuel pump. Given that the pump is pushing only 3 or 4 gallons per hour I'm hard pressed to think that is a problem.

    On the other hand I tried draining a basement with a submersible pump sitting on floor. Once the water level got down to about 2" (10" or all of the motor above the water) I fried the hell out of that pump. Learned something new that day.

    Steve

  18. #54
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    "Took apart a plastic carb once to clean it... came apart well, no gum or anything, but there were pinkish crystals plugging it up. Looked like someone sugared the gas, but I am pretty sure that did not happen. Don't know what it really was, did not try to dissolve them, just cleaned them out."

    Have found that in motorcycle and small engine carbs, too. No idea what it is, but it's pretty inert.

    "Well, I've been doing it for 25+ years and usually sell vehicles when getting to the 200K mark. Never replaced a fuel pump. Given that the pump is pushing 3 or 4 gallons per hour I'm hard pressed to think that is a problem."

    You are lucky. I have fried a Volvo pump by running it empty. Just like the submersible sump pump, they use the medium they are pumping for coolant, and in the case of the fuel pump, lubricant, as well.

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    FWIW I've removed pumps that had minisumps around them inside the tank, where the returning fuel collected then spilled over into the big tank. I thought that was to keep the pump from sucking air at low tank levels on steep grades or fast cornering, perhaps it's a cooling issue as well. Not sure how many cars might be like that.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike C. View Post
    .............

    You are lucky. I have fried a Volvo pump by running it empty. Just like the submersible sump pump, they use the medium they are pumping for coolant, and in the case of the fuel pump, lubricant, as well.
    Running the tank completely empty is not the same as running it until the needle points to E. On nearly all cars there are still a couple of gallons of gas left. Running to the needle pointed at E and fully refueling, then doing the math with my owners manual, my F-150 has almost 5 gallons left.

    Steve

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  22. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by GregSY View Post
    Old gas could sit for years and it would get smelly and the car wouldn't run great but that's all. New gas....turns into crap in a few months.

    As for driving until your car is on fumes....not a great practice. Of course you risk getting stuck due to unforeseen traffic conditions, but most of all it's bad for the fuel pump. The pump is submerged in gas (on modern cars) which keeps it cool. Running on E negates that effect.

    My wifey tied up a pump in Alabama on her way to Florida many years ago. The problem was that she shut it off at the pump. The pump would have been warm from running all day, and the tank being nigh empty. (she's not one to push the limits like I doo. Cheap thrills eh?) Had she fueled up with it running - I'm sure that she would have been OK.



    Quote Originally Posted by Mike C. View Post
    "The less alcohol, the better the mileage. "

    To a point. Running a higher octane than required is also wasteful and can reduce gas mileage. Octane controls burn rate, lowering it so the engine doesn't knock. Running a higher octane rating than required results in unburned fuel in the cylinder and exhaust, or fuel that is still burning after the cylinder pressure has done its work on the piston top. Have heard of guys in the old days running purple 114 aviation fuel in their cars and burning up their mufflers and headers.

    As for getting gummed up carbs clean, try Yamaha carb cleaner. You have to buy it at their parts counter. It comes in a quart can and is a not cheap (about $40/qt last I bought several years ago), but it is nothing short of miraculous. It mixes 4:1 with water, so you are getting 5 quarts of cleaner, in reality. Best thing is, unlike most of the old cab cleaners, it does not harm aluminum, brass or rubber parts. You can literally take a carb off and throw the whole thing in the bucket of cleaner, leave it a week, and have no fear of anything getting eaten. If the carb isn't real bad, you can fill it through the fuel line, let it sit. and drain it out. I have seen motorcycles that have sat a couple of years and wouldn't idle run like new after this quick treatment. Really gummed up ones that have sat a few years may need to be taken apart and the real nasty gum scraped out, but most clean up effortlessly.
    My wifey tried the E85 once to see how it werked out. The milage dropped significantly.


    As for the Yamahahahaha stuff...

    One of the flatslide Mik's on my '02 Doo got gunked up a cpl years ago. I was shocked. We go through our carbs each season to make sure that they are not all gunked up, but I have never had flatslides gunk up, but the round slides would still gunk up, so it's likely the grade of material used to cast, and not the fuel. I thought my carb was fine, but when we unloaded 9 hours away - one side ran like Shiite. (no snow at home for test/tune) I tried to clean out in the snowbank, but just couldn't find or get to the problem.

    I called to order a bucket of carb cleaner when I got home, only to be told that they can't git it anymore. My chum told me to try the Yammi stuff. I was able to eventually get it cleaned out with compressed air, but never had an issue in <20 yrs of flatslides prior to that. Will try to remember the Pine Sol thing next time! Actually - I know that I have one round slide gunked up on a 600 Doo sitting in storage right now - should it ever see daylight again ...



    Quote Originally Posted by JST View Post
    Gas left in a small engine for a few months here does not even smell like gas. It smells like dirty water, and hardly burns. It will "pop" sometimes, but does not actually run an engine, although it will evaporate like gas.

    With a fuel stabilizer in it, it seems to keep pretty well, even over winter, although I run the machines dry before storage.

    Took apart a plastic carb once to clean it... came apart well, no gum or anything, but there were pinkish crystals plugging it up. Looked like someone sugared the gas, but I am pretty sure that did not happen. Don't know what it really was, did not try to dissolve them, just cleaned them out.
    A plastic cardboard meter?


    -------------------

    Think Snow Eh!
    Ox

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    Also - the question was posed 2wice that I saw about diesel.

    Old skewl diesel could sit for many years, possibly even decades w/o much loss, but these days there seems to be too much "bio" added, and now we get an algae issue. I think that plugged filters is the biggest issue with that. Not sure of other issues.

    Years ago the local General Tire facility used to keep bulk diesel in underground tanks for emergency generators. When they went to add on recently (15 yrs ago?) they had to move the tanks, and had to have them pumped out - to the tune of 9000 gallons I think? The fuel was perfectly fine yet, but today's fuel would likely be a nightmare in that app.

    With that said - I am cornfused as to why they went with diesel gens, and not natural gas? The local ATT building has a cpl of big old N/G cats in it, and a few of the municipalities around use N/G fueled gens during the day to keep their peek demand threshold lower.

    LP or N/G shouldn't have the storage issues of gasoline.
    I think that if I was going to purchase a home gen set-up, I'd likely go LP/NG over other options.


    ---------------

    Think Snow Eh!
    Ox

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    On a related note, here's a 'Tube lawyer giving reasons why you should get a receipt each time you fill up in case of getting bad/contaminated gasoline.

    Protect Yourself Against Contaminated Fuel - Lehto's Law Ep. 5.46 - YouTube

    He's sorta chatty, but it's worth a watch. Some of the comments are useful too, including how a receipt kept a guy who was pulled over by the cops for a "gas and dash" from a jail visit. Turns out the attendant mistook him for the runner, but as he had his slip he was let go without (more) headaches.

  25. #60
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    Running the tank down has other issues as well. My father recently did that to his old Volvo wagon, and it quit. He put some more gas in and that didn't help. Next day it started.... near as we can figure, there was water loose down at the bottom, that had separated, and did not have enough alcohol in it to burn, although it would not freeze.

    There is something wrong with that logic.... but I am not sure how the Volvo pump pulls from the tank in a 1986 Volvo... If it pulls from the bottom, it should clear that out, but if it has a level-based intake, (float or whatever) which I would expect it does to avoid sediment, then it might have gone down and hit the water.

    Quote Originally Posted by Ox View Post
    ....
    A plastic cardboard meter?=
    -------------------

    Think Snow Eh!
    Ox
    No idea what that is, but the carburetor on the mower was all plastic. In some ways it was superior to an old one... about a 5 minute job to remove it, pop it apart, clean it and reassemble. No welch plugs, In other ways, not so good, plastic lasts about 10 years if you are lucky, in ANY usage, then it starts ti crack to bits. I doubt gas helps that. But the mower was free... "this doesn't work, you can have it if you want".


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