OT Removing the rear wheel from a John Deere lawn tractor.
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  1. #1
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    Default OT Removing the rear wheel from a John Deere lawn tractor.

    Easy, right? Heat the rubber cover with the heat gun, no problem. Remove the circlip and washer. Slide the wheel off, no f'in way, it is rusted to the axle. Straight 1" diameter axle with a key way. Straight tube 3" long welded in the wheel rusted solid to the axle. Nice and smooth and shiney yellow paint with no place for a puller of any sort. clearly designed by a mental midget with much input from the cost cutting department. I'll have to weld a ring on it to use as a puller lip. Anyone else deal with this bullshit?

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    i don't know if it is to far gone but my dad would set a slug of brass on the end of a shaft and give a sledge hammer whack to some stick shafts..*agree run this past a tractor guy because the bearings may be at risk.

    A helper person with a 2x4 to lever the shaft to the out direction may protect he bearing..

    Soak for a week with WD or the like.

    Oh. heat may be another possibility....perhaps first.

    Drill and tap some puller holes.

    Talk to a tractor guy, perhaps have come for a service call.

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    Not on my John Deere but yes on my old BMW. Fracking thieves in the night stole two of my wheels but ran off without the other two because they were stuck to the hubs so tight they wouldn't come off. I ended up taking an 8' long 2"× 4" and used it as a lever against the suspension upright to pop them loose.

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    Do not pound on the axle you will damage the rear end.
    Quickest way is to drill a couple holes in the rim use a puller like a harmonic balancer puller.
    Some mowers have holes in the rim from the factory.
    May need some heat to get things moving.
    If they are real bad have to disassemble rear end press the axles out of the wheel.
    Done many no fun at all.

    Ed

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    Quote Originally Posted by ecortech View Post
    Do not pound on the axle you will damage the rear end.
    Quickest way is to drill a couple holes in the rim use a puller like a harmonic balancer puller.
    Some mowers have holes in the rim from the factory.
    May need some heat to get things moving.
    If they are real bad have to disassemble rear end press the axles out of the wheel.
    Done many no fun at all.

    Ed
    I am definitely not beating on anything, as wimpy as the rest of this POS is I can see doing a lot of damage. All I need to do is put a tube in the tire as the tubeless tires one after another start to leak. this one goes flat in about 2 hours now and I am tired of airing it up. If there was an easy way to break the beads I would just roll the thing on its side and do it on the mower.

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    Grab a pair of tire spoons from a motorcycle shop or Amazon and instal the tube with the wheel on.

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    Leave the rim on and add slime to seal it? I have done so on my lawn mower a few years ago and it is still holding air, maybe a quick top up at begining of each mow season is all.

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    Quote Originally Posted by moonlight machine View Post
    I am definitely not beating on anything, as wimpy as the rest of this POS is I can see doing a lot of damage. All I need to do is put a tube in the tire as the tubeless tires one after another start to leak. this one goes flat in about 2 hours now and I am tired of airing it up. If there was an easy way to break the beads I would just roll the thing on its side and do it on the mower.
    Try tire slime, I used it on the lawn tractor, wheelbarrow, and hand truck. Haven't put air in those tires since. All auto parts stores sell it.

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    You didn't mention what model tractor you have. Most come with holes in the wheels for wheel weights. If yours does you can fashion a puller using those holes as anchor points.

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    common problem on lots of makes of garden tractor, heat is the only thing that works quickly, or as above, change the tube on the tractor, but give it a dose of release oil every week and it may work loose with use. when you get it off, treat it to some copperslip! As you say, POS design!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob F. View Post
    Leave the rim on and add slime to seal it? I have done so on my lawn mower a few years ago and it is still holding air, maybe a quick top up at begining of each mow season is all.
    We were typing at the same time as I got up to get some more tea in the middle of posting.

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    All that pulling stuff is a great idea, it gives you time to accept the fact that you're gonna have to lose some paint off the wheel. Once you are done with that, remove the valve stem (to vent air) then go ahead and use the torch to heat the hub up good and hot.

    Without heat, all that pulling is likely to be insufficient.

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    Just slime the tire.

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    Quote Originally Posted by howieranger View Post
    Grab a pair of tire spoons from a motorcycle shop or Amazon and instal the tube with the wheel on.
    I'll use the spoons I have had since 1974. No good way to break the bead on the tractor, I don't want to beat on it.

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    You can easily break the bead with a manual lever type bead breaker.
    Commonly used on atv tires they work fine on lawn mower tires.12074_1.jpg

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    Also tire slime easily rinses off with water so easy clean up. I actually did a high tech application on mine by removing the wheels and spinning them on a lathe after putting the slime inside. I figure that was the equivalent of driving the lawn tractor at 60 MPH, same with the hand truck and wheelbarrow.

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    Slime is OK as long as you understand no tire manufacturer will warranty a tire that has been filled with it. In the case of lawn and garden equipment I don't think it's a big deal. Most often the tires last well beyond any warranty period. The tires on my Case lasted nearly 30 years before needing replacement. The ones on my JD lasted 20 years.

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    Yeah I wouldn't worry about the warranty aspect on a little lawn tractor too much. I've got a loader on mine and I beat the snot out of the tires, they're still going after 17 years. Due for replacement soon though. The front tires are slimed and have been for at least 10 years. The rear tires would have been too but are fluid filled for ballast weight.

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    Here’s what I did with Honda 3 wheeler I had with a frozen front axle years ago. Turn it on it’s side, douse in jr oil a few times till it’s seeping out the other side, then simply drive it around slowly without the cotter pin and washer in place. Simply go cut the grass, it will wiggle itself off eventually. Maybe put a little heat to it if you like but it will come off

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    Quote Originally Posted by projectnut View Post
    Slime is OK as long as you understand no tire manufacturer will warranty a tire that has been filled with it. In the case of lawn and garden equipment I don't think it's a big deal. Most often the tires last well beyond any warranty period. The tires on my Case lasted nearly 30 years before needing replacement. The ones on my JD lasted 20 years.
    I have never seen a tire warranty that wasn't a joke. Do you know what it takes to keep a car tire warranty valid?
    All of the tires I am sliming are Chinese junk ones anyway, I don't think my lawn tractor or wheelbarrow has Goodyears on it.


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