OT Removing the rear wheel from a John Deere lawn tractor. - Page 6
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  1. #101
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    Quote Originally Posted by moonlight machine View Post
    Talked to a guy at the JD store. Says they Plasma cut the wheel off the axle tube. Then they support the axle / wheel tube on a concrete block, heat an inch or so of the tube red with the cutting torch and use a cold chisel and a big hammer on the red area and repete down the length of the wheel tube. You don't need to go through the tube. The chisel oversizes the tube enough that it slides right off. Brutal eh? Claims it's the only way to get it off.
    I did similar to get a snowmobile drive off a crankshaft. I broke most of it off, then ground a big flat on one side of the OD until it got thin. When it was under .050 or so thickness down to about .010 you could see it change color quickly enough to stop before going through and hitting the crank, and then it expanded and just fell off.

  2. #102
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    "the tires have tiny weather cracks in the side walls,"

    Have you considered spraying them with FlexSeal? I'm sure that would work great.

  3. #103
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    Do you have any humongous "C" clamps? I have used them before to break the bead loose on a rusty rim.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mud View Post
    I did similar to get a snowmobile drive off a crankshaft. I broke most of it off, then ground a big flat on one side of the OD until it got thin. When it was under .050 or so thickness down to about .010 you could see it change color quickly enough to stop before going through and hitting the crank, and then it expanded and just fell off.
    That's essentially what I proposed in post # 95. I've removed seized stuff that way including off an electric motor shaft with a brutally seized buffing arbor I wanted to be rid of. I had to hit the edge of the flat with a chisel (as if trying to rotate the hub) to get it to split and then it popped open with a snap and could be easily removed. Probably if I had the guts to grind a spec deeper it might have released on its own but I was afraid of grinding through and marking the shaft.

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  6. #105
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    Wow,

    And I thought I was in trouble with my AYP. Can't find a mower deck. So I'm repairing it. But never had problems removing the wheels. Good luck with that quality JD.

    Best Regards,
    Bob

  7. #106
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    Quote Originally Posted by crossthread View Post
    Do you have any humongous "C" clamps? I have used them before to break the bead loose on a rusty rim.
    Yeah. the side walls are so soft that the tire just crushes and the clamp slides away from the bead. I think I am going back to the clamp. if I make a piece that is tapered so it slides between the tire and the rim, has a pocket for the swivel pad and a fork that went on ether side of the fixed side of the clamp

  8. #107
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    Quote Originally Posted by moonlight machine View Post
    Yeah. the side walls are so soft that the tire just crushes and the clamp slides away from the bead. I think I am going back to the clamp. if I make a piece that is tapered so it slides between the tire and the rim, has a pocket for the swivel pad and a fork that went on ether side of the fixed side of the clamp
    Will the tire hold any pressure? I think that the clamp might stay in place if you could get it to hold 5 PSI or so just long enough to break the bead.

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    Quote Originally Posted by moonlight machine View Post
    Yeah. the side walls are so soft that the tire just crushes and the clamp slides away from the bead. I think I am going back to the clamp. if I make a piece that is tapered so it slides between the tire and the rim, has a pocket for the swivel pad and a fork that went on ether side of the fixed side of the clamp
    just replaced the front tires on my Kubota and had very good luck using my 3 ton arbor press to break the beads. Went fast and easy.
    I

  10. #109
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    Quote Originally Posted by moonlight machine View Post
    Yeah. the side walls are so soft that the tire just crushes and the clamp slides away from the bead. I think I am going back to the clamp. if I make a piece that is tapered so it slides between the tire and the rim, has a pocket for the swivel pad and a fork that went on ether side of the fixed side of the clamp

    That sounds like the problem with ATV tires. FWIW I finally gave up improvising and making tools and bought a dedicated ATV bead breaker. Before that I even rolled a ring of crs bar stock1/16 dia larger than the wheel rim, and welded legs to it so I could push on the full diameter of the bead at once hoping that would work, with a small amount of air in the tire. I pressed on it and just managed to press the ring down over the tire and get it wedged on the tire. Had to jack it apart with a porta power

    Circle track guys have bead breakers that have 3 fingers that work in a scissor motion to grab the rim and push the bead off., I bought a plasma cut set of fingers to weld handles on then lost them before it got done so I can't say how well they work. A picture of them might give you ideas.

    all10105__10305.1555102851.jpg

  11. #110
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    Park tractor with wheel about 3' from your nice new stainless trailer hitch, perpendicular. Chain tractor frame to hitch frame, away from center drawbar receiver. Make a tripod of 2x4, screwed together at top, and spread enough (with screwed-in spacers) to span the wheel and press on tire right close to rim. Put hydraulic or manual jack between hitch receiver and apex of pyramid, and extend jack, pushing 2x4s against tire, breaking bead.

    For back bead, if needed, insert jack between frame and tire, actuate. If required, chain or strap jack to axle so it doesn't slip away from rim.

    Are we on page 5 yet?

    Actually, if you have a large enough 3 or 4-jaw lathe chuck, just use that. Hold it up to wheel with one hand (!) while holding and operating jack with the other. What could possibly go wrong?

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    Well, you haven't posted pic or given the model...but Ebay has a bunch of JD lawn tractor wheels - with good tires - for about $20.

    That's a sign from the heavens that you must grind, burn, whatever the old rim off and replace it with a fresh one.

  13. #112
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chip Chester View Post
    Park tractor with wheel about 3' from your nice new stainless trailer hitch, perpendicular. Chain tractor frame to hitch frame, away from center drawbar receiver. Make a tripod of 2x4, screwed together at top, and spread enough (with screwed-in spacers) to span the wheel and press on tire right close to rim. Put hydraulic or manual jack between hitch receiver and apex of pyramid, and extend jack, pushing 2x4s against tire, breaking bead.

    For back bead, if needed, insert jack between frame and tire, actuate. If required, chain or strap jack to axle so it doesn't slip away from rim.

    Are we on page 5 yet?

    Actually, if you have a large enough 3 or 4-jaw lathe chuck, just use that. Hold it up to wheel with one hand (!) while holding and operating jack with the other. What could possibly go wrong?
    I have an 18" chuck but Charles Atlas is not around to hold it up there!

  14. #113
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    Quote Originally Posted by moonlight machine View Post
    I have an 18" chuck but Charles Atlas is not around to hold it up there!
    You do know not to mention Atlas here right? Might I suggest Lou Ferigno and Jack LaLane instead, one to hold the tractor & rim and the other to rip the tire off.
    Arnold the Governator could give a play by play commentary while Maria Shriver asked him questions for the audience....

  15. #114
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob F. View Post
    You do know not to mention Atlas here right? Might I suggest Lou Ferigno and Jack LaLane instead, one to hold the tractor & rim and the other to rip the tire off.
    Arnold the Governator could give a play by play commentary while Maria Shriver asked him questions for the audience....
    Great idea, you will arrange it then? Wait, LaLanne is in Forest lawn pushing up daisies.

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  17. #115
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    Finally got my chipper-shredder apart! Not at all what I expected, the shaft was tapered, and the part that I thought was the crankshaft was actually part of the wheel. My puller wasn't doing any good at all. Finally, lots of heat and repeated attacks with a planishing hammer shook it loose. That's when I discovered that there were TWO sets of threads, one on the crank, and one on the wheel. All I had to do is slide a pin into the crank and then screw a screw into the wheel to pull it.

    Got it all back together and it fired up on the first pull! But it shook like a paint mixer. I guess I may have bent the crank with all my beating on it. Oh, well...
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails chipper-shredder-1.jpg   chipper-shredder-2.jpg  

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    Quote Originally Posted by steve45 View Post
    Finally got my chipper-shredder apart! Not at all what I expected, the shaft was tapered, and the part that I thought was the crankshaft was actually part of the wheel. My puller wasn't doing any good at all. Finally, lots of heat and repeated attacks with a planishing hammer shook it loose. That's when I discovered that there were TWO sets of threads, one on the crank, and one on the wheel. All I had to do is slide a pin into the crank and then screw a screw into the wheel to pull it.

    Got it all back together and it fired up on the first pull! But it shook like a paint mixer. I guess I may have bent the crank with all my beating on it. Oh, well...
    I'd like to have a chipper, lots of old growth trees here that are always dropping limbs.

  19. #117
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    Got that tire fixed yet ?

    we got snow last night, about 2".....

  20. #118
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    Guess if its not off yet better call the governor and ask if working on stuck tractor wheels is allowed.

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  22. #119
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    Quote Originally Posted by moonlight machine View Post
    Wait, LaLanne is in Forest lawn pushing up daisies.
    Yeah, He and Charles Atlas are probably looking down on this situation wondering " why didn't he just put tire sealant in that damned tire back on Sunday the 5th, Grass would have been mowed by Monday

  23. #120
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    I think drilling a hole and pumping it full of caulking is in order.


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