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  1. #21
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    I read that some drives, like Toshiba, use fluid film bearings that gets gunky (like mine) and heating the drive up can help. I should add that I only want access to the disc long enough to copy everything off it. Then I will toss it for good.

    As for the drive being sensitive to debris....I have had one that I fully opened yesterday. It's been running in open air. It is sitting next to me and I can plug it in and it works still. This is one that was broken (disc would not spin) but I was able to free it up enough that it started spinning again.


    Edit: I just plugged it back in and it was stuck again. I bump-started it with my finger and it's spinning and working again.

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    Quote Originally Posted by GregSY View Post
    lol...there is less-than-zero chance that I am giving access to any of these drives to any other human on Earth.

    I have just enough friends in the computer business to know that the split second any device is handed over, it gets scanned for anything of interest and the contents thereof become public information.
    well that's not true.

    Make sure there is an NDA agreement for the data.
    All of these companies are familiar with HIPA, PI, and they cannot make the data public as you claim.
    Also any of these companies that did that would not be in business very long.

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  4. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by GregSY View Post
    I read that some drives, like Toshiba, use fluid film bearings that gets gunky (like mine) and heating the drive up can help. I should add that I only want access to the disc long enough to copy everything off it. Then I will toss it for good.

    As for the drive being sensitive to debris....I have had one that I fully opened yesterday. It's been running in open air. It is sitting next to me and I can plug it in and it works still. This is one that was broken (disc would not spin) but I was able to free it up enough that it started spinning again.


    Edit: I just plugged it back in and it was stuck again. I bump-started it with my finger and it's spinning and working again.
    Slamming it on the table is more satisfying

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  6. #24
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    It's really not an issue worth discussing....here's why:

    1) An NDA won't do anyone any good. It's essentially unenforceable because if they do 'steal' your data, how will you ever prove it happened? And how would you ever prove they were the ones who did it? Most of all, if they did violate the NDA...am I really gonna spend thousands of dollars to sue them? Don't forget, it's a civil action, not a criminal action. I could go through all that...or I could simply not ever give access. Life's short.

    2) Even if they don't make it 'public' intentionally, what happens when they go tits-up in 3 years and all of their backups are sent adrift in the cyber sea? The data becomes public then. Any company that promises privacy is yanking your chain. Not to mention the security breaches we read about every week.

    3) Even if the company doesn't make your data public, someone will see it. Aside from their own curiosity, there are legal reasons. Suppose someone sent them a drive that was full of child porn or plans to blow up the White House, and they failed to notify the authorities. The minute they handle data and don't take steps to ensure it is 'safe', they become liable. That's life in 2021.

    4) People are no smarter now than hundreds of years ago. I can prove that because hundreds of years ago they knew exactly as much about privacy and confidentiality as we do now...."Three people can keep a secret if two of them are dead."


    It's really bad...people seem to have lost all of their sense of privacy these days. Apple, Google, and just about every other company tracks you, and sifts through your life, and not only do you not mind, you actually pay them for the trespass.

  7. #25
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    Also....look at the success of Polaroid photos in the old days. Why did people not use regular film? Because they knew when took it in for developing, someone would see it.

    My former BIL ran a photo lab....every day someone would drop off film with naked pics of their woman doing God-knows-what. He at one point had to fire one of the developers when it was learned that he had a massive compilation of naked pics...boxes full.

    Nothing is protected or private as soon as you hand it to someone else. Period.

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    Quote Originally Posted by GregSY View Post
    "Three people can keep a secret if two of them are dead."


    It's really bad...people seem to have lost all of their sense of privacy these days.
    It wasn't too bad until the one in Houston that was NOT dead went bugf**k nuts all over PM.

    Now there's hard men from a dozen outfits trying to get to his place first and grab whatever TF was so valuable as to justify such a fuss.

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    Quote Originally Posted by GregSY View Post
    ...
    Nothing is protected or private as soon as you hand it to someone else. Period.
    Are we maybe a tad paranoid?
    If the CIA, NSA and other three letterer places trust such services perhaps you could?

    "I have just enough friends in the computer business to know that the split second any device is handed over, it gets scanned for anything of interest and the contents thereof become public information."
    I'd out this under questionable or lying friends or things read on the net.
    This crazy distrust is not understood. If you do make a copy and think a hard working "Black Hat" can not access the copy....
    You worry too much.

    As far as the original try you are needing a how of hard small drives work. Not the same as the big platters of past.
    There is not just data encoded on the disk surface. Getting a dead motor to spin is so great.
    Bob

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    Quote Originally Posted by thermite View Post
    Why 20 whole megabytes could store the entire knowledge of the human RACE .. ....that was WORTH KNOWING!

    The BAD news?

    That last part is still true.
    Bill,

    You are just like a goldmine, one needs to dig through megatons of shit to find a few nuggets.

    dee
    ;-D

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  13. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by dcsipo View Post
    Bill,

    You are just like a goldmine, one needs to dig through megatons of shit to find a few nuggets.

    dee
    ;-D
    Life is hard. It's harder when you can't tell shit from gold to begin with.

    "TDS" byproduct? Or am I confusing cause and effect?

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    Quote Originally Posted by GregSY View Post
    lol...there is less-than-zero chance that I am giving access to any of these drives to any other human on Earth.

    I have just enough friends in the computer business to know that the split second any device is handed over, it gets scanned for anything of interest and the contents thereof become public information.
    Sounds more like your friends in the computer business are shitballs.

    I've been recycling computer parts for years. Handled literal tons of hard drives. I've plugged in exactly zero to see what data was on them. The firm I sell to has a multi million dollar insurance policy to ensure data destruction.

    The reality is, people that can recover data off a defunct hard drive can just as easily get that data in easier ways that won't have a well documented path back to them. We download it directly from the microchips implanted in your brain.

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    Quote Originally Posted by snowman View Post
    The reality is, people that can recover data off a defunct hard drive can just as easily get that data in easier ways that won't have a well documented path back to them. We download it directly from the microchips implanted in your brain.
    Since WHEN? Not followed the "fake news' the past many years, already?

    "Brain" tissue went too scarce and rare ages ago to waste it padding the chips when s**t is cheap and plentiful!

    Besides "rubber hose decryption" is sooooo much faster!

    Even then? "Not always!"

    One of the founders of one of my early clients went down for "Obstruction of Justice" with nary a shred of evidence of wrongdoing. No EVIDENCE under US jurisdiction is why they put him in a Federal prison to begin with, thinking he would see the light and they would soon have the access to the "offshore" data they wanted.

    He was a Korean War vet. Badly crippled up from protecting his mates by throwing himself on a grenade.

    They picked the wrong guy. He had the last laugh. Died in prison, cheerful to the end. Well-liked, even.

    He had taken revenge.

    HE knew he was dying of cancer. They did not know.

    Saved his family a lot of money. Left the Fed empty-handed. The re-organized company growing more than ever. Made himself out a cult hero!

    Humans. Not as easy as all that to deal with, after all.

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    Quote Originally Posted by gustafson View Post
    My first PC [286 XT]with a 20mb hard drive, yes 20 mega byte.
    Our first computer also had a 20 MB hard drive--and TWO 5-1/4" floppy drives!

    Funny thing about 5-1/4" floppy drives, I went to an estate sale recently. The deceased man had owned a computer business and there was a lot of new old stock computer parts. In the mix were some brand new 5-1/4" floppy drives, including a couple with mil spec part numbers on them. They were asking $50 apiece for them! I asked why and another customer told me to go look on Ebay. I did and, sure enough, 29 floppy drives had sold on Ebay that month, ranging in price from about $40 to over $300! I inquired on Tom's Hardware and learned that some military and industrial facilities still use very old systems and they're worried about keeping spares. (I knew some CNC machines use older components). Anyway, I went back on the last day of the sale and bought 5 drive for $25 each. I've already sold one on Ebay for $58, need to list the others.

    As far as computer techs looking at HD data, I'm surprised that nobody has mentioned Hunter Biden.

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    Quote Originally Posted by steve45 View Post
    As far as computer techs looking at HD data, I'm surprised that nobody has mentioned Hunter Biden.
    Person could prolly be higher paid to NOT "mention Hunter Buy-ed-in" than he could get off eBay for a War Two surplus aircraft carrier.

    Speakin' only of s**t(s) nobody in their right mind wants a damned THING to do with... if only off their insane storage and operating costs .... and f**kwit-liability risk?

    "The smartest man I know."

    Jayjus Joe? The parmesan CHEESE CRUMB smoker?

    That sort of statement is a first-class act of global TERROR if not also terror'ism!

    Thank GOD we already knowed you as a notorious LIAR!

    Or so we hope and pray?


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    Quote Originally Posted by GregSY View Post
    I have about 6 internal HDDs from old laptops, all of which are 'broken'. By broken, I mean they will no longer boot up and all of the data on them is 'trapped' inside. There appear to be two basic modes of failure....the disc drive is so sticky that the little motor no longer has enough power to spin it, or the little arm (stylus) gets jammed up on the disc - probably from being bent at some point.
    The classic trick is to smack them sharply on a wooden desk while un-powered, then try to get them to spin up. If it works, copy everything. It probably won't work again.


    These HDDs are all labelled from different makers...Toshiba, Samsung, Hitachi, etc. but they all look very similar and I am guessing are all made on the same 'mold'.
    Not even close.


    So my question is....can I remove the disc from a broken drive and install it into a working drive? I think I can physically do that pretty easily, but will the working drive be able to read the new disc that came from another maker?
    A civilian has zero chance of getting this to work on a modern HDD.

    So, the question is economic. If you hand it to a recovery outfit, they may well succeed. But is it worth thousands of dollars to you?

    Yes, reliable outfits do exist. But they are not cheap.

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  21. #35
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    Practically 30 years ago we had a talk by a guy from a data recovery company. They had clean room conditions to be able to disassemble drives and try to get data back off the disks. They mentioned that one job was a drive that Stevie Wonder had been using to record for a new album. No backup so if they failed all that work was down the drain. The internal joke at the company was "Where did Stevie see our ad?"

    Data density on disks has gone up monumentally since then, so the job hasn't gotten any easier.

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    Quote Originally Posted by JDennis View Post
    An old trick that may work.

    Put the HDDs in the freezer for a day. Remove them and quickly hook them back up to the computer. Copy and back up everything you can. If you find certain files that you cant get, go around them and get everything else. Save it to a different drive.

    This is a temporary fix (when it works, which is not always, depends on the reason for the original failure). The drive will fail again.
    I did this with an employer's laptop back in about '04. I was frequently offsite and did not upload my files regularly to the company server. I did not know that the hard drive was accessible from the outside of the laptop so I froze the entire laptop. I was able to get a few files off at a time, took 5 or 6 iterations to get all the data I needed. Leased computer - sucks to be the 2nd owner of the laptop, bound to have created some corrosion long term after half a dozen freeze / thaw cycles. Mentioned my data recovery method to the IT guy when I dropped it off for repair - he just shook his head and showed me how easy it would have been to remove the HD to freeze only the HD.

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  24. #37
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    If you really care about the data, use a real data recover service, someone like Iron Mountain. They don't care in the slightest about your piddly data. Their reputation is worth far more than any data you have is.


    You won't like their price though.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Joe Gwinn View Post
    The classic trick is to smack them sharply on a wooden desk while un-powered, then try to get them to spin up.
    THis is silly if you don't have them powered up when you do it you cannot hear when the drive start spinning again[ruh ruh ruh RUUUUUUH] so you know to stop slamming it on the table.

    Do think before you post.........

    And I did this dozens of times. The data was not irreplaceable but the other computer was too far away.

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    Quote Originally Posted by gustafson View Post
    THis is silly if you don't have them powered up when you do it you cannot hear when the drive start spinning again[ruh ruh ruh RUUUUUUH] so you know to stop slamming it on the table.
    One sharp smack will dislodge a stuck head from the platter. The shock should be oriented such that it causes the head assembly to swing. Banging away isn't needed.

    In the old days, if you smacked the drive while it was running (including spinning up when just unstuck), there was a good chance you would crash the disk drive, and the heads would proceed to gouge grooves into the platter surfaces.

    I have such a platter hanging on the wall, for show and tell. It screeched while dying, and there was aluminum dust everywhere. Fortunately, we don't build disks like that any more.


    Do think before you post.........
    Good idea.


    And I did this dozens of times. The data was not irreplaceable but the other computer was too far away.
    I'm glad that your luck held up.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Joe Gwinn View Post
    I have such a platter hanging on the wall, for show and tell. It screeched while dying, and there was aluminum dust everywhere. Fortunately, we don't build disks like that any more.
    But in the old days, you could take the platter out and resurface it. They were either copper or plated copper. 8" disk, as I remember. They also had external pulleys to drive them - to change from 60hz to 50hz you changed the drive pulley. Shugarts, K&T's with the C and some D controls had them. Later D's went to scsi, a magnificent improvement


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