OT - Shower repair idea, worth trying or too stupid for words? - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndyF View Post
    I have a plastic shower stall that is ~6' tall and the drywall joint to the shower stall is deteriorating due to excess moisture. I'd like to retain the appearance of drywall above the shower stall, but need to find something that is moisture resistant and can hold up in a damp environment. Painted regular joint compound doesn't hold up in a steamy moist environment.

    I've looked for a building product to use in place of joint compound that is more water/moisture resistant, but haven't found anything. So, the next idea, and I won't be disappointed or offended if someone tells me this is a stupid idea, was Bondo. Is there any reason why the Bondo wouldn't work? Or is there a better product?
    Did you know this is a machinist forum?

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  3. #22
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    ++2 on Durabond. Do not expect to be able to hand sand it (I'm sure it would sand OK w/ a random orbital sander or similar). Durabond is a synthetic plaster and is excellent for wet plaster repairs. Is said to harden underwater - never tried that out myself. I had a 3 x 8 foot section of water damaged wet plaster where the only the scratch coat remained. I used a fast setting version of Durabond and ended up "wet sanding" using a brick dunked repeatedly in water - PITA but the wall repair ended up looking better than some of the other walls in that room.

  4. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by gwilson View Post
    The name of the water putty is "Rock Hard Water Putty". Finally popped into my head. I have a lot of respect for that stuff. Once dry,it is totally impervious to water.
    I have used this product for filling nail heads and cracks in wood.
    I believe it is a wood flour product mostly.
    The drywall joint should have been finished with a plastic J-bead and caulked with a butyl product.
    Now that the damage is done I would remove 6" of drywall above the surround and replace it with green board ,J- bead and butyl caulk.

  5. #24
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    I put in a plastic shower stall this summer. I am 6'2" so I also worried about splash and the plaster/button board. I cut it back and installed tile board and 6" of tile above. I see no splashed water more then 1/2 way up the tile, none on the plaster.
    In retrospect I should have built up the wall to flush, with tile board, with the old drywall. Then used the special tile with one rounded edge designed to make a neat transition down to the plaster. As it is the tile is flush with the wall and the edge is a little wavy. Not a clean edge to stop the paint at.
    Bill D.

  6. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by John Welden View Post
    Did you know this is a machinist forum?
    Did you notice the OT?

    I feel honored to be trolled by the illustrious John Welden, but am disappointed that it was such a half assed effort. I had hopes for more.

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  8. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sachmanram View Post
    The obvious solution is better venting of the bathroom.
    Could be ... but I will say that some fiberglass shower units are (poorly) designed in such a way that they practically beg for problems to occur. There is one in my house that has a significant "ledge" at the top. There is a flange that the drywall fits over, so that water does not go down behind the shower unit (at least in theory) ... but even with the drywall lapping over the flange, there is still a ledge that is nearly 1" wide (and even more in the corners). The ledge is not high enough to avoid some water splashing up onto it while showering, and it is not sloped at all to shed the water that gathers. The result, over time, is predictable, and better ventilation or even a dehumidifier wouldn't make a lot of difference.

    Of course, the OP does say in a later post that better ventilation would help, so perhaps his shower unit does not suffer from this idiotic design flaw. If so, I'd be happy to trade ...

  9. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by awake View Post
    ...Of course, the OP does say in a later post that better ventilation would help, so perhaps his shower unit does not suffer from this idiotic design flaw. If so, I'd be happy to trade ...
    You have just described my shower. Idiotic design flaw is an apt description.


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