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  1. #761
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    Quote Originally Posted by tdmidget View Post
    ...
    Now about these wonderful aquifers. How will they be recharged with a rain fall of 12-15 inches/year? I have lived in Tucson 25 years and we have many years with less than 8 inches total rainfall. At my house a prickly pear can be like a soda cracker. Face it the water is just not here. Up there you have snow melt for 6-8 weeks/year and that is pretty much it. This ain't Texas.
    Ha. Lived in Tucson for a year (U of A freshman) and I rembember, one could take a shower in the morning, not use a towel, and just put on your clothes and walk outside, you'd be bone-dry in about three minutes. Recall the huge pumps that supplied irrigation ditches around some of the original campus - and thought where *is* that water coming from??

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    Quote Originally Posted by tdmidget View Post

    Now about these wonderful aquifers. How will they be recharged with a rain fall of 12-15 inches/year? I have lived in Tucson 25 years and we have many years with less than 8 inches total rainfall. At my house a prickly pear can be like a soda cracker. Face it the water is just not here. Up there you have snow melt for 6-8 weeks/year and that is pretty much it. This ain't Texas.
    The nearby aquifer is the Ogallala. It's fed from rainfall up Minnesota way so is relatively unconnected with local rainfall down here where they're drawing from it. Hydrologists seem to know a surprising amount about the actions of aquifers since they can test oxygen isotopes in the water and can tell how long ago it entered the ground. It can be on the order of 300 years in this region.

    So the issue of replenishment is interesting and pertinent. The water table in the Ogallala has been dropping for years because of pumping, requiring deeper wells to draw from it and changing some of the economics of the agriculture dependent on it. And I don't know what that means long term. If all pumping stopped right now, would it take another 300 years for it to recharge to pre-industrial levels? Surface water (rainfall) and groundwater (deep aquifers) where they're drawn from may have no connection.

  3. #763
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    Quote Originally Posted by tdmidget View Post

    Now about these wonderful aquifers. How will they be recharged with a rain fall of 12-15 inches/year? I have lived in Tucson 25 years and we have many years with less than 8 inches total rainfall. At my house a prickly pear can be like a soda cracker. Face it the water is just not here. Up there you have snow melt for 6-8 weeks/year and that is pretty much it. This ain't Texas.
    I think its high time we start thinking about how water is used, maybe things like coal fired power plants in the desert is not a great idea, next on the list would be the pivot irrigation systems to grow alfalfa that then gets trucked off to another state. And of course cities like Vegas need to realize that lawns and a swimming pool in every back yard is not sustainable, and if they run out of water, tough titties, you can't just steal it from counties a few hundred miles away.

    Oh yeah, how about golf courses in the desert, Scottsdale and Phoenix have far too much of that.

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    Quote Originally Posted by michiganbuck View Post
    QT: [there's no money in it for the tds folks out there orwells 84 is alive and well in 2021 its your money do with it what you will but keep your hands off my stack jack.]

    Lost jobs, high energy prices, high taxes, more people eating up the Social Security funds that Americans funded will be the way they will take our country right out from under us.
    Tens of millions of jobs lost under your cult leader trump and you are already beating up on Biden for job losses. You better get your FACTS straight.

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  7. #765
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    Quote Originally Posted by standardparts View Post
    Yes, I lived in the Southwest. You mention no sign of human life for a hundred miles. You do realize there are reasons for that don't you?

    Lack of potable water is a big one. Areas lack sufficient rain fall to grow crops unless you have irrigation rights. No feed no raising of livestock.

    But yeah go ahead and simply drop human beings off in the middle of nowhere. Why not resettle your great City of Detroit? Most certainly plenty of room to replace the tens of thousands who abandoned that shit hole.
    I'm sitting in the middle of nowhere typing this. Minimum "lot" size is 40 acres but some own a square mile. It's the desert but that doesn't mean people can't live here. I don't raise my own crops here. Ever heard of a supermarket? That's where I get groceries. Many people buy water and have it hauled in but we had a well put in. Plenty of water here now. Just because a place doesn't have every comfort of home doesn't mean people can't live there.

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  9. #766
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    Quote Originally Posted by standardparts View Post
    Yeah "Big B" we know how you Michigan liberals set the standard for helping minorities live the American dream.

    "Worst places to live in America: 6 Michigan cities make list" is just one hit if you do a search for " Michigan worst place for minorities".

    Maybe try to clean up your own back yard before lecturing others.
    I can make a list that says the top 100 worst places to live are in Wisconsin too. Do you believe everything that you hear? I guess most trump cult members are like that. Very naive people they are.

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    Quote Originally Posted by tdmidget View Post
    How much water did you see out there in those lonely miles? People need that y'know.
    We also own property in New Mexico. I did some research as to how deep the water wells are in our area. Come to find out they are mostly around 50 feet deep, about the same as our places in Michigan. Just because it's in the desert doesn't mean you can't live there or get water. Ever heard of Phoenix Arizona? Pretty arid there too but millions of humans live in the area.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Scottl View Post
    I haven't been following this thread closely but based on the most recent posts I have to ask ...

    Are there rolling blackouts at the Statue of Liberty?
    Probably not because New York doesn't have fools running it that think not being a part of the national grid is a good idea.

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    Quote Originally Posted by standardparts View Post
    "Potable water"---safe drinking water is the main issue. Areas such as the Navajo Nation lack infrastructure and other areas simply have water that is contaminated by minerals and pollution from various sources. Many areas the only safe water is trucked in.
    Water trucked in. Oil trucked in. Groceries trucked in. What's your point? Are you advocating getting rid if trucks and having everything produced within a mile of where it is to be used?

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    Quote Originally Posted by tdmidget View Post
    San Juan has 2 of 4 units shut down. 4 corners has 3 of 5 destroyed and the remaining 2 (1600 MW) scheduled to shutdown in 5 years. Navaho is completely shut down and destroyed (2400 MW). You may not only have a water problem but also an electricity problem. Cholla has 2 units shut down and is only producing a bit over 200 MW.

    Now about these wonderful aquifers. How will they be recharged with a rain fall of 12-15 inches/year? I have lived in Tucson 25 years and we have many years with less than 8 inches total rainfall. At my house a prickly pear can be like a soda cracker. Face it the water is just not here. Up there you have snow melt for 6-8 weeks/year and that is pretty much it. This ain't Texas.
    In the last couple of months we have spent some time in the Tucson area as well as Phoenix and Yuma and all I can say is why are they building so many homes and businesses with such limited water? It's a building boom same as it has been for most of the last few decades.

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    With not requiring a grassey yard people can live just about anywhere. Yes, a little bigger expense to drink and shower with bought water..until the gruuberment decides it is not fair for people who decided to live there should have to pay more for water than people living in great lakes states.

    So with some payola and phony jobs are given to politicians, kids Water will be piped in or Taxes will pay to subside the dry place water.

    Wow, $4,600 an acre, better go buy some of that.
    They say if you rub two rattlesnakes together you get free music.

    Sun, Space and Everything You Need: Land for Sale by Owner in Tucson, Pima County, Arizona : #270129 : LANDFLIP

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    Quote Originally Posted by TGTool View Post
    The nearby aquifer is the Ogallala. It's fed from rainfall up Minnesota way so is relatively unconnected with local rainfall down here where they're drawing from it. Hydrologists seem to know a surprising amount about the actions of aquifers since they can test oxygen isotopes in the water and can tell how long ago it entered the ground. It can be on the order of 300 years in this region.

    So the issue of replenishment is interesting and pertinent. The water table in the Ogallala has been dropping for years because of pumping, requiring deeper wells to draw from it and changing some of the economics of the agriculture dependent on it. And I don't know what that means long term. If all pumping stopped right now, would it take another 300 years for it to recharge to pre-industrial levels? Surface water (rainfall) and groundwater (deep aquifers) where they're drawn from may have no connection.

    The Ogallala is not "nearby" to Arizona and Nevada.

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    Quote Originally Posted by neilho View Post
    Yeah, the EB-5 program. US citizenship for $500,000, not very many questions asked.
    There's actually a lot of questions asked, if you are some little guy trying to follow the rules. It's the sharks who buy off our legislators to skirt both the rules and the intent of the regulations.

    The concept is good, it's just that Congress could fuck up St Peter's halo if they put their mind to it.

    Quote Originally Posted by Big B View Post
    In the last couple of months we have spent some time in the Tucson area as well as Phoenix and Yuma and all I can say is why are they building so many homes and businesses with such limited water?
    Because they are ignorant, stupid, greedy bastards ?

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    OT: not about energy
    [Quote Originally Posted by neilho View Post
    Yeah, the EB-5 program. US citizenship for $500,000, not very many questions asked.]

    Likely, a program like that was why that Chinese guy was looking at our company, even though we were not asking a million for it.

    RE: [Because they are ignorant, stupid, greedy bastards], who have a plan to put some bucks in their own pockets.

    Not ignorant but sneaky smart.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Big B View Post
    We also own property in New Mexico. I did some research as to how deep the water wells are in our area. Come to find out they are mostly around 50 feet deep, about the same as our places in Michigan. Just because it's in the desert doesn't mean you can't live there or get water. Ever heard of Phoenix Arizona? Pretty arid there too but millions of humans live in the area.
    Not on 50 ft wells, they don't:
    https://www.watereducation.org/sites...uck_cullom.pdf

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    Quote Originally Posted by Big B View Post
    I can make a list that says the top 100 worst places to live are in Wisconsin too. Do you believe everything that you hear? I guess most trump cult members are like that. Very naive people they are.
    Let me help. In Wisconsin the worst cities have been and are run by Democrats.

    Milwaukee has some great development and affluent parts of the city, but most of Milwaukee is pretty nasty. Oh yeah,,,,worst public school system in the United States. But the upside is plenty of water even though Milwaukee is prone to dumping millions of gallons of sewage into Lake Michigan from time to time.

    Racine...bad place to be if your black and really bad if you depend on the union teacher run public school system. Racine has been in decline for a couple of decades. It's run by far left liberal Democrats.

    Kenosha...Welfare magnet city with lots of building still burned out/boarded up from rioting.

    Madison...Well what can you say about Madison.

    As far as "Trump Cult Members" go it would seem that Trump seems to dominate your mind. Seek help. Is it possible your experiencing the same rapid mental decline as Joe Biden?

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    Quote Originally Posted by tdmidget View Post
    San Juan has 2 of 4 units shut down. 4 corners has 3 of 5 destroyed and the remaining 2 (1600 MW) scheduled to shutdown in 5 years. Navaho is completely shut down and destroyed (2400 MW). You may not only have a water problem but also an electricity problem. Cholla has 2 units shut down and is only producing a bit over 200 MW.

    Now about these wonderful aquifers. How will they be recharged with a rain fall of 12-15 inches/year? I have lived in Tucson 25 years and we have many years with less than 8 inches total rainfall. At my house a prickly pear can be like a soda cracker. Face it the water is just not here. Up there you have snow melt for 6-8 weeks/year and that is pretty much it. This ain't Texas.
    In the 90's lots of good paying jobs at those power plants. I guess the operative phrase is "used to be lots of high paying power plant jobs". At the time the power plants and natural gas production in San Juan Basin were the source of good paying jobs. That was about it. Was a great area to live.

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    Quote Originally Posted by tdmidget View Post
    Oh yeah. "Water and Power Available". Had friends who would show off the brochure from some "land company" in the SouthWest selling a 40 acre "ranchette" for unbelievably low prices compared to Midwestern land prices.

    You would get the guy retiring out of a plant and either move to his dream get-a-way "up north" or head to a place where all their retiree friends settled either in Florida or Arizona.

    But.......Some just in love with one of those ranch lots. LOL Then they find out they have no water or mineral rights. And the elec power is a long way off on the highway and gets pricey bring power in.

    BTW---Was familiar with ranch North of Cheyenne that at 70,000 acres was NOT a paying cattle operation. "Driveway" was something like 12 miles off of 25. Ranchers eagerly embraced the missle silos back in the day....You get a real nice paved all weather road to the launch site.

  25. #779
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    Quote Originally Posted by standardparts View Post
    ...
    Madison...Well what can you say about Madison.
    ....
    Lived there 3 years, an amazing place, great public transportation, terrific people, vibrant and prosperous. 5 stars, would retire there if I could.

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    Quote Originally Posted by michiganbuck View Post
    Not ignorant but sneaky smart.
    If Kenny-boy Lay is your idea of smart, yeah, I guess so ...


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