OT: Use of the word "clocking" for rotational angle alignment - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    gun plumbers clock barrels, sights and screw heads.

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    We us it for signal timing, T1 or DS1 get "re-clocked" every so many spans it miles.

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G930A using Tapatalk

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    Clocking is also slang for recognizing someone.

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    Related we use "timers" to "clock" a core in the correct rotational position in a mould

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    Quote Originally Posted by rcoope View Post
    Here's a silly topic for a Monday: In an engineering call this morning, which involves Canadians and Americans and both physicians and engineers, the use of the word "clocking" was discussed, as the (Canadian) physician didn't know what it meant. I know a lot of American engineers use this term to generally refer to having rotational angles set up correctly. The most common instance of this I can think of is timing belts and chains in cars where all the pulleys have to be at the right angle to each other before the belt goes on. But I am not convinced "clocking" is the most common term for this, so was curious to ask in this forum, which is suffused with wisdom in the mechanical arts. I'm sort of a physicist and part electrical engineer so I'd say something like "you have to get the phase angles correct". What terminology do you all use?
    Ya...canucks complaining about conrfusing American terminology.....Not

    I have a drawing in my possession, from the great white north, showing stub out locations for a machine tool foundation, that I was to layout.

    1. qty (1) stub out labelled "hydro"
    2. qty (1) stub out labelled "compressed air"
    3. Qty (1) stub out labelled "water"
    4. qty (1) stub out labelled "drain"
    5. qty (1) stub out labelled "earth"

    All in different locations around said machine tool.....

    What doo you recommend as being better terminology for "clocking"
    "flucked around" ?

    Take off hoser !

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    In my world, the verb form "to clock" means to rotate an object in its mounting plane. The verb form "to tilt" would be used to describe the rotation of an object out of its mounting plane.

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    Thank you for the excellent responses. I'm not sure this was a particularly Canadian/American thing, maybe more a doctor/engineer thing. You know what is an awesomely confusing difference? In the British Parliamentary system, including in Canada, when you "table" something you put it on the table for discussion. In the American system, you evidently take it off the table. I have literally had to explain this difference on conference calls when it was causing confusion. That's a pretty excellent summary Digger Doug, you should just be pleased a huge packing crate didn't get sent to you held together with Robertson Screws.

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    "rotational orenetation" is what pisses my fabricators off.
    I can say it but not spel it.
    Gw

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    In the UK clocking means

    1 - recognising someone as in ''I clocked his dial'' ;- saw his face.

    2 - winding the mileage back on used cars as in ''what 6 years old and only 18K? - it's been clocked''

    3 - in machine shops etc etc - getting parts set / to run true with a dial test indicator, as in ''clocked within a thou ''

    4 - clocking in / out - punching in or out on the time clock at work.

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    Quote Originally Posted by rcoope View Post
    Thank you for the excellent responses. I'm not sure this was a particularly Canadian/American thing, maybe more a doctor/engineer thing. You know what is an awesomely confusing difference? In the British Parliamentary system, including in Canada, when you "table" something you put it on the table for discussion. In the American system, you evidently take it off the table. I have literally had to explain this difference on conference calls when it was causing confusion. That's a pretty excellent summary Digger Doug, you should just be pleased a huge packing crate didn't get sent to you held together with Robertson Screws.
    Oh no...I fully understood the print, been watching T.V. come across the pond since the 1970's
    1. The beachcombers
    2. chilly beach cartoon
    3. The red green show (when it was on the local Hamilton station)
    4. This hour has 22 minutes
    5. The royal Canadian air farce
    6. The rick mercer report
    7. Corner gas
    8. Chilliwack (the band)
    9. Gordon Lightfeet
    10. April wine
    11. Bob & Doug :YouTube
    ( I happen to own this album.....)



    But clearly 90% of Americans would not understand "hydro" is the electric hook up.

    In this case (a spot welding machine with rotating axis) the unit had a water cooled
    welder, hence "water" and "drain".

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    Quote Originally Posted by cg285 View Post
    i think in this example the term would be "anal" haha
    Its common among the instrumentation guys I've worked with, they align the points on tube nuts/fittings as well. Yes, they're anal (and expensive) but their joints don't leak and the instruments never lack signal.

    Sent from my SM-G973U using Tapatalk

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    The term is used to describe so called AN electrical connectors. AN stands for Army Navy and these connectors have been common at least since WWII. They typically have an aluminum shell with a rib protruding inward inside the shell. The plastic inserts that hold the contacts have a number of grooves, any one of which can be the locator for the insert. That allows the use of the same connector in multiple places on an assembly with them turned different ways to keep from hooking up to the wrong place. These are referred to being clocked a certain way. When I first encountered these connectors in the early 50s, "clocked" was the term used and AFAIK that is still the term.

    Bill

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  19. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by digger doug View Post
    Oh no...I fully understood the print, been watching T.V. come across the pond since the 1970's
    1. The beachcombers
    2. chilly beach cartoon
    3. The red green show (when it was on the local Hamilton station)
    4. This hour has 22 minutes
    5. The royal Canadian air farce
    6. The rick mercer report
    7. Corner gas
    8. Chilliwack (the band)
    9. Gordon Lightfeet
    10. April wine
    11. Bob & Doug :YouTube
    ( I happen to own this album.....)



    But clearly 90% of Americans would not understand "hydro" is the electric hook up.

    In this case (a spot welding machine with rotating axis) the unit had a water cooled
    welder, hence "water" and "drain".
    That Hydro thing is funny, but sort of understandable given three Canadian provinces (BC, Manitoba and Quebec) and Norway are the only four major jurisdictions that get almost all their electricity from hydroelectricity. What surprised me in your list was "earth" for ground. That's definitely an English thing that is pretty much gone from Canada at this point as far as I know.

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    Quote Originally Posted by rcoope View Post
    What surprised me in your list was "earth" for ground. That's definitely an English thing that is pretty much gone from Canada at this point as far as I know.
    Probably a relocated British ex-pat making the drawings....or this guy:
    YouTube

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    I have been in this kind of work for over fifty years and the only place I encounter "clocked", is here. I started as an apprentice in 1966 in a large shop with about fifty journeymen, some of which were Tool & Die Makers. When one referred to a part alignment, it was "indicated in" or "dialed in" or some variation of these. "Clocked in" referred to the time clock.

    JH

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  23. #36
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    Used in a sentence, when you’re putting a shrink fit pin in certain heavy EQ with rosebuds on the bosses and the pin in liquid nitrogen, you better have it clocked right before you try it.

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    Inspired by limy's post above:

    As I was clocking out at work the other day I clocked a guy who purchased a used lorry from me, when he accused me of clocking it I had to clock him. All this before beer-O-clock.

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    Clock, align, time, registration,... all the same type things.
    Some people you encounter may never have considered the concept but is it so super simple to explain.
    Some will have a word they like.
    I don't care if your name for it is different for doing it than mine and do not know why anyone would.
    Do you clock, align, time or register your cam and crank in a small block chevy as you assemble it? I think you do them all.
    Maybe if fussy you advance or retard that by a bit so it that behind or ahead of the clock? Certainly not registered on zero but maybe registered with a planned lead or lag?

    It would seem a simple concept and the name used not so much important.
    Clocking is also used for simply indicating a part, one needs to know what is going on in the conversation. That's what separates us from the AI machines.
    Bob

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    FWIW, I've always understood clocking the mean to get the relative phase angle correct with respect to discrete choices. So old bicycle bottom brackets had square tapers that you used to mount the crank arms (the things with the pedals screwed into them), So "clocking" the crank arms means installing them so that they are 180° out of phase, not 0 or 90 or -90. (this is not typically lingo used in bike wrenching, it's just an example I could think of).

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    Quote Originally Posted by bosleyjr View Post
    FWIW, I've always understood clocking the mean to get the relative phase angle correct with respect to discrete choices. So old bicycle bottom brackets had square tapers that you used to mount the crank arms (the things with the pedals screwed into them), So "clocking" the crank arms means installing them so that they are 180° out of phase, not 0 or 90 or -90. (this is not typically lingo used in bike wrenching, it's just an example I could think of).
    I would agree with this, certainly the way we are using it in our current project involves having the right discreet angle. Clocking is a nice term actually as it sounds like what it means.


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