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  1. #21
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    With a big tractor,the tyre fitters simply slash the tube,and pull it out ...$100+ down the drain.......you will never get all the waster out,because the tube willl suck flat and cut off pockets of water.......the way Ive done it is with inner and outer flexible inflation tubes.....with tractors ,they have a much larger valve stem,which is reduced down to normal car/truck size with a threaded fitting.........anyhoo,back to the concentric tubes.....compressed air thru the outer one ,water blows thru the smaller inner one .......keep the tyre inflated hard,and 99% of the water fill will be blown out thru the inner tube ,which is touching the case at lowest level.......Thats how I drain 18.4x 28 crane tyres.

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    Quote Originally Posted by john.k View Post
    With a big tractor,the tyre fitters simply slash the tube,and pull it out ...$100+ down the drain.......you will never get all the waster out,because the tube willl suck flat and cut off pockets of water.......the way Ive done it is with inner and outer flexible inflation tubes.....with tractors ,they have a much larger valve stem,which is reduced down to normal car/truck size with a threaded fitting.........anyhoo,back to the concentric tubes.....compressed air thru the outer one ,water blows thru the smaller inner one .......keep the tyre inflated hard,and 99% of the water fill will be blown out thru the inner tube ,which is touching the case at lowest level.......Thats how I drain 18.4x 28 crane tyres.
    Do off-road cranes run liquid ballast in the tires? Only stuff I've worked with had to drive down the interstate. Most of them were boom trucks. Definitely no liquid ballast in the tires on a road tractor!

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G891A using Tapatalk

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by 52 Ford View Post
    Calcium Chloride. It weighs more than water and it's cheap, so people (at least used to) use it as tire ballast. It's very corrosive, though.

    It isn't very common, anymore. Usually it's antifreeze, beet juice, or straight water (if climate permits), or maybe something else.

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G891A using Tapatalk

    It's not corrosive to steel if there is no OXYGEN!

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    Quote Originally Posted by EPAIII View Post
    I can't imagine how you would hold much of a vacuum in a rubber tire. Break them down or better yet, bring back and insist that the seller do it.

    And HOW ON EARTH did all that water get in there?
    You haven't spent much time around tractors, I take it?

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  6. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by CalG View Post
    It's not corrosive to steel if there is no OXYGEN!
    Yeah, yeah. Oxidizer ain't gonna oxidize without oxygen. I gotcha. I'm too tired to come up with something witty. LOL. Maybe tomorrow.

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G891A using Tapatalk

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    Quote Originally Posted by CalG View Post
    It's not corrosive to steel if there is no OXYGEN!
    After they fill the tire with calcium the rest is air pressure. So there is definitely oxygen in the tire to cause the normal corrosion that is always in a tractor rim
    Don


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    Ive got a proper Schrader fitting that screws onto a hose one end ,onto a large tractor valve stem other end,it has a small release button,when water comes out the button hole,then the tire is full of water......position the valve at bead level ,and it fills the tire 80% full of water....replace the valve components,and air inflate the tire to around 20psi,depending on what you want.

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    Quote Originally Posted by D Nelson View Post
    After they fill the tire with calcium the rest is air pressure. So there is definitely oxygen in the tire to cause the normal corrosion that is always in a tractor rim
    Don


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    Do a little CHEMISTRY and balance the equation.

    There is only so much oxygen in a given amount of air. ( lots of inert Nitrogen in every cubic foot!)

    Like I said, if the tire is not a leaker that needs constant refill, corrosion is not an issue.

    Millions of hot water heating systems based on iron pipes are proof enough to those who care to read up.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill D View Post
    I would suggest a load strap around the tread to keep the bead seated as long as possible. Could you pump a vacuum through a refrigerated air compressor dryer so the vac pump stays dry? Would a cotton string through the valve stem wick out water over days or weeks?
    Bill D

    PS:: I belive calcium disposal is a legal problem.
    Calcium Chloride is road salt. They use at by the train load here in the Midwest.

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    Quote Originally Posted by john.k View Post
    Ive got a proper Schrader fitting that screws onto a hose one end ,onto a large tractor valve stem other end,it has a small release button,when water comes out the button hole,then the tire is full of water......position the valve at bead level ,and it fills the tire 80% full of water....replace the valve components,and air inflate the tire to around 20psi,depending on what you want.
    We use a venturi type ejector here in the Midwest to pump the tire ballast out when needed such as during a repair.

    The Ag tire guys are setup to pump both ways.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill D View Post
    I would suggest a load strap around the tread to keep the bead seated as long as possible. Could you pump a vacuum through a refrigerated air compressor dryer so the vac pump stays dry? Would a cotton string through the valve stem wick out water over days or weeks?
    Bill D

    PS:: I belive calcium disposal is a legal problem.

    Bill

    The fellow wants the ballast out to remove WEIGHT! A cotton string? it's not freeze dried space food for cripes sake!

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    Quote Originally Posted by D Nelson View Post
    After they fill the tire with calcium the rest is air pressure. So there is definitely oxygen in the tire to cause the normal corrosion that is always in a tractor rim
    Don


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    Air is only 18% O2, over 80% N so when you inflate the tire, the O2 is consumed and oxidation stops. That is why if the tire is a leaker, you will have problems.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 52 Ford View Post
    Do off-road cranes run liquid ballast in the tires?
    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G891A using Tapatalk
    Yes, some off road or RT (rough terrain) cranes use filled tires. Our American RT crane definitely had them. I've been on a couple telescopic boom fork trucks that had them too.

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    My tractor tires are filled, it doesn't seem to hurt flotation as long as you're not in heavy mud. I'd rather have the ballast as it's a small machine. And ballasting the tires is much better than adding weight out back - no extra load on the rear axle that way. Plus it gives you the weight at a lower center of gravity to help prevent rolling while sideways on a hill or with a heavy load in the bucket, etc. I generally have the tires filled AND weight in the back when doing heavy lifting. I modded my hydraulic system a bit by shimming the relief valve to get extra lift capacity so my machine easily takes the back tires right off the ground even with ballast. Factory was only 1,000 psi. I am close to double that now.

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    i found out the hard way not to use an electronic tire gage on water filled tires. I think the only practical way to do this is to pull the tire.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Larry Dickman View Post
    i found out the hard way not to use an electronic tire gage on water filled tires. I think the only practical way to do this is to pull the tire.
    I use one with no issues but it is a fill/check version. As I mount it to the stem I just pull the fill trigger a little so there's positive air pressure going into the stem. Same as I remove it, then use a full trigger pull after it's disconnected to blow any residual liquid out of the stem. Been doing it that way for years now, works great.

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    QT OP[ But 95% of the time I want maximum flotation which means less weight. I also am generally against water in tires....I know it can be done without problems, but I sure hear of a lot of corrosion issues.]

    You can look at the stem and tell if the tires are tube or tubeless. Doing light work on grass or the like air fill is Ok. For much tractor work fill tires are an asset to the work.

    You could take each tire off to lay it on its side and then drain most of the water out.

    likely it might cost at least/perhaps $70 each to have a tractor guy pull the tires and put in dry tubes.

    Guess if they are tubeless you could drill a hole in the outer diameter, drain all the water, and then plug the hole. I would never do such a thing.

    Likely before you drained them you could have traded them to another tractor owner.

    My tractor tires are filled.

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    Beet juice is interesting..
    The real selling points of beet juice are; it’s non-toxic, it’s 30% heavier than water, it resists freezing down to -35°F and the real kicker is that it’s noncorrosive, so it won’t eat your wheels for dinner like calcium chloride will. But as with everything, there is a flip side to Rim Guard, and that’s the price. Rim Guard can be a rather expensive product, especially if you’re filling a large tire. If you can afford the expense, this may be your best option by far.

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    Until the area just across from the valve stem get's sucked up tite to the valve stem.

    Thereby stopping any further vacuum.....

    Break down the tire, and remove the tube, clean out rim and tire carcass inside from any calcium (if used)
    and dry thoroughly before re-assembling.

    BTDT repaired a few rotted out rims for calcium lovers.

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    Quote Originally Posted by CalG View Post
    It's not corrosive to steel if there is no OXYGEN!
    That's a lot of it. If you have tubes, vacuum out what you can and leave it. If it is tubeless it is a different story entirely. Tubeless need the level above the high point of the steel rim, 90% fill is what the local tire guys say. Lower means steel exposed to air, higher means no air cushion. If you are tubeless remove the tire and wash everything, dry and paint if necessary.

    Ed.


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