OT - Vacuum will remove water from tire - won't it? - Page 3
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  1. #41
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    Most of what I do is mow and/or drive across the grass. In dry times, the weight of the tractor won't matter much. But when the ground gets wet, it's important to 'float' as much as possible and every bit of weight matters.

    It's a vicious circle....when it rains, the ground gets soaked and the grass grows like crazy but you can't mow because the ground is soaked. So you have to time your mowing as best as you can....as soon as possible after rain but before it rains again.

    Here in Houston, they truck in every bit of aggregate when they pour concrete - that's because the ground has no rocks in it. It's pure dirt and clay. Add to that the flatness of it all (low drainage) and it makes mowing tough. Every year, the 'new' neighbor moves in and tears up his yard because he doesn't understand that you can't mow when you want. Or, you CAN mow but you'll sink your mower and/or put some 8" deep ruts all over your land.

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  3. #42
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    I grew up in Houston, so I'm aware of the ground conditions. Love that Houston black clay. Heaves like a sonbitch.

    You need a push mower instead of a lawn tractor.

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    Not for a few acres of 12" tall grass, I don't!

    Here's the stem. The tires themselves are marked tubeless. But...I've seen stems for tubes and tubeless that resemble the stem I have so I am not quick to judge what's in there.stem-.jpg

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    Quote Originally Posted by russler View Post
    Valve at 6 o’clock, nylon hose ( road ranger range change hose maybe) through the valve stem and seal best you can, inflate,deflate, repeat
    This is how the fellow changed the tires on my big tractor(JD6030). The outfit he used seemed to be a commercial product. In south Texas calcium chloride is frowned on, the tractor tire service guys hate it because it ruins their leather boots. Just wait a few days after a hard freeze to use your tractor. The last hard freeze we had here I checked the rim to see how cold it was before using the small tractor.

    I would think you would risk ruining the tube with vacuum beside trapping water in the folds and creases when the tube collapsed.

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    Quote Originally Posted by GregSY View Post
    . . .Here's the stem. The tires themselves are marked tubeless. But...I've seen stems for tubes and tubeless that resemble the stem I have so I am not quick to judge what's in there.stem-.jpg

    That setup, with external washer, is indicative of a TUBELESS installation. With the tire deflated, loosen the nut as far as you can while still leaving it fully engaged on the stem and 'pump' the stem in and out of the hole. I think you'll be able to tell if there is a tube attached.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gordon Heaton View Post
    That setup, with external washer, is indicative of a TUBELESS installation. With the tire deflated, loosen the nut as far as you can while still leaving it fully engaged on the stem and 'pump' the stem in and out of the hole. I think you'll be able to tell if there is a tube attached.
    And you can stop by the Kubota tractor dealer and look at a wheel, then ask of that style is tube or tubeless.

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    That doesn't really mean much. You can put a tube in a wheel & tire designed to be tubeless. Really just loosening the nut and deflating the tire will usually give you a good idea since invariably the shrinking tube tends to pull the stem out of the hole with considerable tension.

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    Stupid question but what's the purpose of having water in the tires?

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    As mentioned above, it can greatly increase the weight for traction and lower the CG. On many tractors, particularly farm equipment with a front-end loader, it makes a world of difference. The liquid isn't plain water in most cases. Its still often water saturated with calcium chloride which is much heavier than plain water. Other mixtures and liquids are also used.

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    On tractor tires that ia a typical tube installation. Over sized stem is for filling and draining with water more quickly. The nut helps keep the stem in place during the initial installation also keeps it from being sucked in if it ever gets low. Breaking down a large tractor tire and replacing a tube costs upward of $400.00 dollars. Ask me how I know.antlerintire2rs.jpg

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    Quote Originally Posted by FredC View Post
    On tractor tires that ia a typical tube installation. . .
    Maybe, maybe not. Those valves are widely used in tubeless installs as well. These days I'd bet there are at least as many air/water valves in tubeless wheels as in tube-types mainly because there are heavy liquids available that are not particularly corrosive.

    The combo valves I've seen on tubes aren't used with a washer, you just run the nut down to the end of the thread and call it good. You don't want to be putting much tension on the stem assembly for obvious reasons. The valves made for tubeless rims do use a washer and can be snugged up for easy sealing because the inside part is better reinforced.

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    I used to run tubes in my tires. Problem I ran into. The stems on the tubes are rubber. We have a big problem with rabbits, and the furry little muther fuckers would chew the stems off.

    Noe I go tubless with solid steel stems.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mtndew View Post
    question but what's the purpose of having water in the tires?
    More weight. As long as the ground isn't really muddy, you get more traction.

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G891A using Tapatalk

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    Quote Originally Posted by Larry Dickman View Post
    I used to run tubes in my tires. Problem I ran into. The stems on the tubes are rubber. We have a big problem with rabbits, and the furry little muther fuckers would chew the stems off.

    Noe I go tubless with solid steel stems.
    One word answer to your problem....Hasenpfeffer !

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    If the geometry doesn't allow you to drain completely through the stem could you deflate the tire and break the bead loose in one spot so most of it drains?

    For the rest maybe heat the tire and wheel to increase evaporation. Not super hot, just a good bit hotter than ambient.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Scottl View Post
    If the geometry doesn't allow you to drain completely through the stem could you deflate the tire and break the bead loose in one spot so most of it drains?

    For the rest maybe heat the tire and wheel to increase evaporation. Not super hot, just a good bit hotter than ambient.
    If you break the bead, you'll still need to stick a shop vac hose in there.

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    Quote Originally Posted by EPAIII View Post
    I can't imagine how you would hold much of a vacuum in a rubber tire. Break them down or better yet, bring back and insist that the seller do it.

    And HOW ON EARTH did all that water get in there?
    Water doesn't compress like air, it makes the tire act much stiffer for heavier load bearing. Also as said above it lowers the center of gravity of the tractor.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gordon Heaton View Post
    Maybe, maybe not. Those valves are widely used in tubeless installs as well. These days I'd bet there are at least as many air/water valves in tubeless wheels as in tube-types mainly because there are heavy liquids available that are not particularly corrosive.

    The combo valves I've seen on tubes aren't used with a washer, you just run the nut down to the end of the thread and call it good. You don't want to be putting much tension on the stem assembly for obvious reasons. The valves made for tubeless rims do use a washer and can be snugged up for easy sealing because the inside part is better reinforced.
    I had to check, all three tractors have tubes, all 8 wheels have knurled nuts holding the stems in place. The one in the photo looks to have a hex flanged nut with a rubber washer showing. So your observation is probably generally true. You know any one can do something completely different just to prove us wrong. :-)

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    I d ring the tyre service to fix a flat on a crane ....they always send a very fat guy who doesnt wash.....and wears filthy jeans at half mast.....he sweating on the 1 ton wheel +tyre...when his mobile rings .....its in his buttcrack .....get my phone ,he says......

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    I think a for sure answer to tube or tubeless is a bit important.
    One vacs A/C systems with the boil off small amounts water or moisture but do not see this working here.
    This process removes drops of water not quarts or gallons and for sure tubeless would not like this.
    All of which brings about ... just remove the wheel/tire. Dismount and do as needed.
    Bob


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