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  1. #61
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    Or calcium chloride (vs. pricier beet juice) in the ballast water.

  2. #62
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    I called two tire places today, places out in the country. One didn't answer the phone The other told me to remove the valve core and tip the tire over and most of it would come out. They never heard of someone wanting it all out.


    Anyway, here is the mowing rig....on wet days I float the deck so it sits level with the ground but the wheels on the deck are just skimming along. That way, they don't leave skinny ruts. The weight of the deck plants the rear tires (no need for added water in the tires). I've never been able to get stuck using this method, and it disturbs the ground as little as possible. If the deck isn't floated, the tractor will bog down if you hit an especially muddy area.rig.jpg

  3. #63
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    IF you ever have an HVAC guy charge your AC system with a lot of coolant, they invert the fill tank so that they are transferring liquid.

    If they tried to do it using vapor phase it would take a lot longer. Also, as liquid evaporates, it absorbs energy. That is, the Freon (or the water in your tire) will get colder and colder as the liquid pool evaporates. This cooling would slow water evap rate to a crawl because the vapor pressure (which drives evaporation) is lower at low temperatures.

    You could increase the vacuum on the tires, but as others have said, if you draw enough vacuum, you'll break the bead.

    If it were my tractor, I'd leave the small amount of water in the tire. If I really had a need to remove the water, I'd jack the tractor up, break the bead, and pour or scoop or sponge the liquid out. Keep in mind, you may have it filled with a calcium chloride mix, which is a bit (like salt) corrosive. I'd probably rinse it out. I'm assuming tubeless tires.

    Using a suction tube hooked up to a trap hooked up to a liquid-tolerant vacuum pump might work. Might clog the tube repeatedly, too. If I were forced to to that I'd probably remove the valve body from the rim and use a bigger tube to suck it out.

    If you wanted to rig up something, get a tee fitting that fits on the valve stem. Attach a compression ftting to one of the long ends, suitable for fitting a tube slightly smaller than the Schrader valve ID. Then hook a pressure hose to the single right angle side. Put a long plastic tube in the compression fitting and tighen. Hook it up to the valve stem and pressurize (with the valve stem down).

    The air pressure pressurizes the tire. This forces the liquid into the tube, through the fitting and out the end of the tube. You can put the tube into an empty bucket so that if you do have CaCl, there's no spill. The liquid doesn't have to be vaporize. You can adjust the flex time and fish it around to get most of the liquid out. And you aren't limited, except by the tire, in terms of how much pressure you can use (you can only draw the vacuum down to less than 30 inches of mercury, or 15 psi, whereas you can probably put in 30 psi to the tire. )

    In any case, using vacuum to remove a lot of water from a tire via evaporation is a losing proposition.

  4. #64
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    If you want it all out and it is tubeless you will have to break them down and use a wet vac. It's even hard to get all the water out of an unmounted tire just by tipping.

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    If you're dead set on using the vacuum pump, plumb it through a catch bottle first and run a tube from the valve stem (a small tube shoved all the way in there so the end rests down in the bottom of the tire) to the catch bottle, then another tube from the catch bottle to the vacuum pump. This will build the vacuum in the catch bottle and rapidly suck all the liquid out, and also isolate the vacuum pump from liquid. If you instead try to vacuum evaporate all the liquid out you might be there for days or weeks.

    I use a similar setup to pull liquid out of inaccessible areas or reverse the connections to pressure bleed difficult brake and hydraulic lines. You can use the suggestion of just pulling the valve stem core and laying the tires valve stem side down, but I would only do that if you're sure it's straight water in there unless you don't like your grass.

  6. #66
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    I have nearly the same tractor as Greg, only mine has a loader.
    I wanted more weight on my rear end. It has a bit of hard time pushing the 84” finishing mower in reverse, was always spinning out. Also I believe it adds some stability on sloped road ditches.
    I wanted Rimgard beet juice, but nobody around here has any.
    I ended up using -30 windshield washer fluid, easy to get and install plus it’s cheap. My tires are r1s tall and skinny, the r4s that Greg has has more volume than mine. No swampy mud here.

    If I wanted the fluid out of a tube I would try one of these tube deflator Venturis AA Standard Bore Tube Deflator (Dill Type) Valve Core Tool – All Tire Supply they will suck a tube flat for easier installation.

    Fred C got any photos of the 6030, my friend has one they are a cool rare old tractor. Years ago I seen one with a V6 Detroit in it, Crome stacks coming up both sides of hood.

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    Your rear tires have water and antifreeze or calcium chloride for traction. You also may have wheel weights on the front tires to keep the tractor from lifting when a plow or disc is employed with 3 point hitch attachments.
    If flotation tires is what you want then have them installed.

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    Well, here's a bad idea but what the heck ... if it's tubeless ;

    Remember those plugs they used to put in tires ? The ones that are illegal now but used to have a shoulder, would go in from the outside then the shoulder would expand and air pressure kept them in the hole ?

    Drill a 1/8" hole through from the tread, let the water all drain out through the hole, then plug it with one of those old tubeless tire plugs. You aren't going very fast so it shouldn't be real dangerous.

    If that was in page one of this I apologize, didn't see it.

  9. Likes michiganbuck liked this post
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    Quote Originally Posted by true temper View Post

    Fred C got any photos of the 6030, my friend has one they are a cool rare old tractor. Years ago I seen one with a V6 Detroit in it, Crome stacks coming up both sides of hood.
    How is this. Truck lost traction going up the hill. The truck and the box weighed 390,000 + lbs. You can not see me in the tractor with the reflection, but I am the one driving. 1300 RPMs in first gear at this point, just barely moving.
    img_0229rs.jpg

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    Redneck mode, engage!

    Air up tire, drill a hole a 6 0 clock, force out water. Then plug hole?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cole2534 View Post
    Redneck mode, engage!

    Air up tire, drill a hole a 6 0 clock, force out water. Then plug hole?
    How you gonna drill the hole at 6:00 oclock ?

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    Quote Originally Posted by digger doug View Post
    How you gonna drill the hole at 6:00 oclock ?
    Right angle drill, duh.

  14. #73
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    Quote Originally Posted by Superbowl View Post
    If you want it all out and it is tubeless you will have to break them down and use a wet vac. It's even hard to get all the water out of an unmounted tire just by tipping.
    If he wants all the water out why not do it the easy way - just drill a hole in the tire.

    I say that in jest but if the hole was small enough it could probably be plugged to make it airtight. I've many times plugged holes in tire treads made by nails or screws and then driven them until they wore enough to need replacing. Never had one leak.

    Seriously though, the suggestion to pull the valve core and drain most of it sounds fine.

  15. #74
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    ok then, how bout you build a a small electrolyser that will fit through the valve stem?

  16. #75
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    Or better yet;

    If it ain't broke, don't fix it.

  17. #76
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    You cannot tell me there are no mobile tire service guys in your area, call one up, have him break them down, maybe spend a few extra bucks on new tubes. The guy I call to fix my JD loader tires is about 5' tall and has arms thicker than my thighs, I've always considered it money well spent.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Scottl View Post
    If he wants all the water out why not do it the easy way - just drill a hole in the tire.

    I say that in jest but if the hole was small enough it could probably be plugged to make it airtight. I've many times plugged holes in tire treads made by nails or screws and then driven them until they wore enough to need replacing. Never had one leak.

    Seriously though, the suggestion to pull the valve core and drain most of it sounds fine.
    scottl you are the third to say that I was one and EmanuelGoldstein another (perhaps more).

    Yes, it would be a short cut easy method if they are tubless. Total cost about $1.00 or so.

    likely the very best method would be to take them off and go with them to Hawaii and wait for them to dry on a nice beach...a week or two should work.

    *But no looking at the pretty girls or it becomes a pleasure trip and then you cant write to off as a business trip.

    Re: I have used these and you can even double them up for a big hole..about 30 cents each.
    In a pinch, you can push them in with a dull screwdriver. Take care to not drill too deep and drill through the wheel...but even that you can just get a wheel hole welded up. If you don't have a welder just buy new wheels. Get them at the Hawaii tractor store.
    AA Brown Tire Repair Plug Insert – All Tire Supply

  19. #78
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    There might be someone local who can show up and do it, but in general I loathe having to hire anyone. It seems I can hardly recall the last time someone showed up and did a half-ass decent job. I'm not a perfectionist, I promise.

    I'm thinking of taking the wheels.tires to a local shop and having them remove the tires....that's the hard part*. I can then drive it all home and get it dry to my satisfaction. Then, I think I can re-mount the tires myself.


    *I've done tons of car and motorcycle tires but the last time I tried a tractor tire (12 years ago) it needed more force than my tire irons could handle.

  20. #79
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    Just switch out your tires with "rice and cane" tread.......
    You should be able to remove the tire & rim from the tractor, lay it down, and break the tire down
    with not too much exertion.

  21. #80
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    I'm mixing concrete in 1 quart batches to do detailed touchup work on patches today, I get what you are saying about hiring outside help, I'm not a perfectionist either.

    Tire work is where I draw the line, I'll put a spare on, but I'm not breaking one down. First time I called the tire guy for the JD I figured I would learn, after watching him do it, I was happy to pay his price.

  22. Likes GregSY liked this post

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