OT/ What is substutition for Lime-Away? - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by digger doug View Post
    The OP is long gong.

    Yes, please try vinegar, ammonia, and bleach.
    1-1-1 in the same bowl.

    As digger correctly notes, the OP died in 2017. [edited per ekretz]

    The mixture digger suggests is not a good idea unless you wish to die and kill everyone in your house.

    FWIW, concrete etcher is often urea monohydrochloride. This combines a weak base (urea) with a strong acid (hydrochloric acid, also known as muriatic acid). The urea part keeps the acid part from producing chlorine gas. Very effective at removing calcium carbonate and insoluble metal salts.
    Last edited by bosleyjr; 01-04-2020 at 12:19 AM.

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  3. #22
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    ...when I was a little kid, me and my best friend from down the block were playing around one summer day. For some reason (maybe I was tasked with pulling grass out of the brick sidewalk out front or some other boring task) we decided that we should make some sort of potion that would kill grass and relieve us of the tedious chore of doing it with our fingers.

    Anyhow, we went in the house and dug around under the kitchen sink and in the bathroom for everything I could think of that would make a potent grass killer.

    Dug an empty mayonnaise jar out of the trash, washed it out under the outside faucet... then, on the front porch, I dumped "drano" crystals in the jar... poured in a little Clorox.... and didn't get any farther than that before an invisible gas nearly suffocated us... luckily we were by the edge of the porch and jumped off, running.

    Dumped that shit out on the ground and gave up on the grass killing potion idea.

  4. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by bosleyjr View Post
    As digger correctly notes, the OP died in 2016.
    2017 actually. I miss 'ole RJ.

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  6. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by sfriedberg View Post
    For those unfamiliar with digger doug's sense of humor, this is a recipe for producing free chlorine gas, which is toxic enough to be used as a poison gas in WW I.

    Despite explicit safety training on NOT MIXING ammonia and bleach cleaning agents, a group going through AF basic training at the same time I did managed to gas themselves bad enough to send three of them to the base hospital at Lackland AFB for a few days.
    I once gassed myself with this combination while scrubbing the moss covered walls of a bathroom in Tacoma, WA. Nearly choked me to death, but it sure got the walls clean!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Yan Wo View Post
    I once gassed myself with this combination while scrubbing the moss covered walls of a bathroom in Tacoma, WA. Nearly choked me to death, but it sure got the walls clean!
    I've used it as a wood bleach, too, and to wipe out an insect infestation in a damp bathroom - taped the door airtight, didn't go back in for a couple of days...

    Dave H. (the other one)

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  9. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by jimVrudy View Post

    I believe that Muriatic is basically HCL, hydrochloric, which bleach is as well.
    Bleach is sodium hypochlorite. Useless for getting rid of lime, really.
    It was common practice where I grew up to toss a little vinager in the washing machine with the soap.
    As stated above, you combine bleach with ammonia and you make poison gas.

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  11. #27
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    If you have a farm store around there is a product called milk stone remover, it is phosphoric acid.

    Steve

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  13. #28
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    really old thread.

    But, the current goodie for rust removal is Jasco Metal Prep, which is pretty much just phosphoric acid. Also "evapo-rust", which is not phosphric, and may work a little better, but costs considerably more.

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    WOW!!!, this thread takes the cake for all the best of PM, necrothread, potentially fatal advice, getting everything wrong (not everyone), not addressing the OP's (RIP) question AT ALL, sarcasm in place of advice, just incredible...

    and by the way CLR is lactic acid now. muriatic is hydrochloric, exactly the same thing, and in my opinion, the word "muriatic" should just go away. no, bleach is not acidic, it's a highly alkaline solution of around 5% sodium hypochlorite with a PH of 11 or so.

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  16. #30
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    Listening to a Chemical question answers from a machinist is about the same as listening to electronic questions from the same bunch. That is why I have quit even reading any electronic threads here or on any other machining forum. :-)
    ...lewie... (retired electronic engineer) with some chemical background. :-)

  17. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lewie View Post
    Listening to a Chemical question answers from a machinist is about the same as listening to electronic questions from the same bunch. That is why I have quit even reading any electronic threads here or on any other machining forum. :-)
    ...lewie... (retired electronic engineer) with some chemical background. :-)
    And that's what's cool about this forum - some of the posters are chemists. Some are doctors. Some are electrical engineers. They also do machining, or at least want to educate themselves in the field, but have expertise elsewhere that they bring to the table when needed.

    And we tend to be a self-correcting bunch (sometimes gleefully/viciously), so if bad info is given someone will chime in. At that point, an interested reader is able to review, do additional searching, and come to a conclusion.

    It's rare that totally awful advice lasts long here...

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  19. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by E. Bobicki View Post
    Lime away, aka CLR is glycolic acid solution, I guess it is used because it is a mild organic acid (kinda like citric but with an alpha hydroxy group) yet it is strong enough to dissolve basic deposits in a reasonable time.

    A cheap substitute would be phosphoric acid or even cheaper muriatic (HCl) that has been diluted, if you have the neccesary protective equipment. Phosphoric doesnt fume but it can be hard to find.
    I keep a gallon of phosphoric acid in my chemical cabinet when I need to remove rust or pickle some clean bare metal. I get it from a local chemical warehouse in gallons of 70% for about $20 last time I bought some.

    It can be filtered after it gets dirty and it lasts a long time.

  20. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lewie View Post
    Listening to a Chemical question answers from a machinist is about the same as listening to electronic questions from the same bunch. That is why I have quit even reading any electronic threads here or on any other machining forum. :-)
    ...lewie... (retired electronic engineer) with some chemical background. :-)
    Unless the reader is an utterly ignorant moron, (for example, someone who might mix bleach with ammonia - and for the record: I agree with the sentiment behind Digger's post, just not the execution) it's pretty simple to separate the wheat from the chaff. The blind are easily led into trouble by the blind. Those who can see not so much.

  21. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by jimVrudy View Post

    I believe that Muriatic is basically HCL, hydrochloric, which bleach is as well. That is a bit different from Phosphoric Acid.
    Not quite. Muriatic is hydrochloric acid (HCl), in water, but chlorine bleach is a hypochlorite (ClO—), vs. a chloride (Cl—), specifically sodium hypochlorite, in water.

    Vinegar is acidic acid (CH₃COOH) in water. This may be your best bet (other than or in addition to a fabric softener) for your towels.

    Phosphoric acid, a.k.a. orthophosphoric acid
    (H3PO4) and acidic acid are weak acids, i.e. only partially dissociated, whereas hydrochloric acid is a strong acid (fully dissociated).

  22. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lewie View Post
    .....
    ...lewie... (retired electronic engineer) with some chemical background. :-)

    There are more of us here.....

  23. #36
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    i believe the main ingredient in naval jelly is phosphoric acid . dark sodas like cola and dr pepper contain a small
    amount of phosphoric acid , a bit of carbonic acid, citric acid . ph of about 3 . not practical for my purposes .


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