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  1. #21
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    One of my great regrets was tossing the five or six Coleman stoves at my parents when we cleaned the place out.
    A couple of those had been our camp gear from way back when I was a kid.
    Those days.... every picnic table had a roaring Colman lantern- some two mantle deals and a blinding orb of light to go with it.
    Over it all the glorious star filled night.
    I can hear the sound of those lanterns still..

    I saw a couple of accidents- one was a Coleman White gas stove on a picnic table blow- big ball of flame go up till it hit the screen room roof and flames slipped out the sides burning up the screen.
    The other was a buddy while backpacking over pressure a SVEA 123 white gas stove- another flame up which took out his tent with him in it- was exciting for a couple of seconds there...

    Thanks- kicking myself again for not keeping one of those camp stoves...

  2. #22
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    i got some of the little army ones...they still work OK,but the leather pump buckets have broken,and I pinched the leather from my blowlamp......or was it the other way round?......Unfortunately,I didnt bother with the little transit cum boiler cases,and seems thats the rare part for collectors.

  3. #23
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    My dad hung a lantern in a tent to satisfy my sisters fear of the dark. It flared up in a good sized fire. He had the tent all zipped up. He got it unzipped pretty quick. I was already out of the sleeping bag getting my sister out when dad came in. He got the lantern out with only scorching damage to the tent. Not too smart but a lesson learned.
    I still have that lantern. I may get it out and revive it.
    It always amazed me that those cloth bags didn't burn up.

    Enjoy your trip to Yellowstone M. B.

  4. #24
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    I have nothing to add as far as the stove, I agree with the others, be careful and you should be good.

    If you are going to Yellowstone, be sure to check out Grand Teton as well. It's just outside of Yellowstone, just as beautiful, and very much less crowded.

  5. #25
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    My dad got some serious burns from a malfunctioning Coleman lantern (alone) in a deer cabin half a century ago. Rough week. Lantern came with the cabin; in later years he brought his own. Lesson learned: always light it outside, and let it run for a bit before moving it indoors.

    I have moved to propane & batteries for cooking and lighting, so it's time to post the 2 stoves and 3 lanterns to CL for the next guy to enjoy. Apparently some of the lanterns are worth some money. We'll find out...

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  7. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by medsar View Post
    I second this from Rob. One further clarification -- there is a lot of debate in the hiking community about alcohol stoves and them getting banned by the FS. I don't claim to be an expert, but there is usually a gradated ban from alcohol stoves along with campfires and then all flames from any source. The key thing would be that alcohol stoves and campfires don't have an on/off switch. I think you are hearing about alcohol stoves being called 'liquid stoves' and people are applying it to white gas.

    I own a lot of stoves: 2 colemans, 2 or 3 whisperlites, I might still have the simmerlite, a couple jetboils, esbits, alcohol stoves, etc etc.
    That makes sense. The only bans I've read about so far have been during the summer months and don't seem to specify the fuel so much as the control you have over it. IOW, open campfire vs. a stove that can be shut off.

  8. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob F. View Post
    Out here in the summer dry season there are no fires of any kind allowed in national forests. No camp stoves or gas lanterns at all. Might double check that "open fires" does not include other flames like in camp stoves etc.
    That is what blows my mind about living in Virginia after spending the first 50 years of my life in Cali. There is no such season as dry season here and due to the high humidity I couldn't light the forest on fire in summer with a blow torch. I always enjoyed wood fired BBQ, back in Cali you could light a split piece of soft wood with a match. Here you couldn't do it with a torch unless you held it on there for a couple minutes and it still might go out after it starts to burn.

  9. #28
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    The "new" generator showed up in my mailbox yesterday afternoon (Ebay find). It has some surface rust on the outside, but appears to be new-old-stock. The valve and needle ends look new at least. The knob is exactly the same as the tank valve, so I'm guessing its an old Monkey-wards, but from a smaller model. Its the correct length and the needle side fit in it's hole no problem. I made an adapter bushing for the other end and the tube is a smaller 3/8" diameter (old was around 1/2"), but hopefully it works the same.

  10. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dualkit View Post
    That is what blows my mind about living in Virginia after spending the first 50 years of my life in Cali. There is no such season as dry season here and due to the high humidity I couldn't light the forest on fire in summer with a blow torch. I always enjoyed wood fired BBQ, back in Cali you could light a split piece of soft wood with a match. Here you couldn't do it with a torch unless you held it on there for a couple minutes and it still might go out after it starts to burn.
    Similar in Texas. I'm in the coastal/piney woods region where it's a humid swamp most of the time, but occasionally will get dry enough to support a brush fire. A few years back there was a really bad wild fire in central Texas that kinda took us by surprise. Texas is big-headed about many things, but California has us beat in the wildfire game.

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    That’s a cool stove, enjoy it
    I picked up a new in the box 1970 Coleman 413g last summer that I put use once in a while, works great.
    I also found this German Army stove last year, all brass and bronze. I think they were supposed to boil water in their helmets



    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro

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  13. #31
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    M. B., That looks like the Mercedes of camping stoves. Fired up outside on the drive way should prove it out.

    I wonder if Montgomery Ward was ever called anything but Monkey Ward?

    Paul

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  15. #32
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    I rolled it outside and fired it up at lunch time. Seems to work well enough and no explosions yet! I'll run it again this evening when I can actually see the flames though.

    I lived in northern Idaho for a couple years growing up, but have never been to Yellowstone. I'm actually looking forward to the drive. Once we get outside of Texas and the landscape starts to change, I enjoy being able to sit and watch it all go by. This will be the first time my 6 year old's been camping so should be a fun trip.

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  17. #33
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    I would not hesitate to use that stove. It looks very nice. I have an alcohol stove on my boat and so do some of my friends. Actually, most of the people I know who have stoves on their boats use alcohol. I think it may be safer then having a gas explosion. Speaking of brush fires, we had to call the fire department last weekend out at a buddies house in Amelia county. We were shooting a Barrett .50 with armor piercing and incendiary rounds. We were using a 1" thick steel plate for a backstop. Went right through that and into some old railroad ties. When we came back out after lunch about 1/4 acre was on fire. Will not do that again.
    Last edited by crossthread; 06-18-2019 at 04:02 PM.

  18. #34
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    Somewhere in my collection of junk I have a NIB military issue Coleman lantern that uses unleaded gasoline, no idea if it is a special mod or what, never been been brave enough to try it either.

    Some years back I was camping in the Hoh rain forest, took a few hours to get a decent campfire going there.

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    Quote Originally Posted by dalmatiangirl61 View Post
    Somewhere in my collection of junk I have a NIB military issue Coleman lantern that uses unleaded gasoline, no idea if it is a special mod or what, never been been brave enough to try it either.

    Some years back I was camping in the Hoh rain forest, took a few hours to get a decent campfire going there.
    From my understanding, regular gas burns the same but will leave more junk in the generator from all the additives they put in fuel. So perhaps the generator is bigger or just easier to clean?

  20. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by crossthread View Post
    Speaking of brush fires, we had to call the fire department last weekend out at a buddies house in Amelia county. We were shooting a Barrett .50 with army piercing and incendiary rounds. We were using a 1" thick steel plate for a backstop. Went right through that and into some old railroad ties. When we came back out after lunch about 1/4 acre was on fire. Will not do that again.
    I think its funny you guys thought that 1" plate would act as a backstop for that instead of acting like a paper target.

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  22. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by M.B. Naegle View Post
    I lived in northern Idaho for a couple years growing up, but have never been to Yellowstone. I'm actually looking forward to the drive. Once we get outside of Texas and the landscape starts to change, I enjoy being able to sit and watch it all go by. This will be the first time my 6 year old's been camping so should be a fun trip.
    Yellowstone is wonderful. Take some warm clothes. We were camping in Y. Sept.2 1973 and had 8 inches of snow & temp in the 20s overnight.

    You might enjoy this at Cody, just east of Yellowstone: Buffalo Bill Museum - Buffalo Bill Center of the West

    Paul

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  24. #38
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    We've been trying to do one "big" vacation every other year. I don't have a lot of motivation to go on cruises and the like, but driving around our own country is fun! I'm particularly fond of the western states, but it seems that everywhere we go, we end up running out of time with still plenty to do. My kids are still young, so theme parks and other high $$$ destinations won't be remembered right now, but it's nice to get them out and see the sights and try to hook up with family members along the way.

  25. #39
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    Thanks guys for sharing your support AND your less fortunate experiences. Just to summarize, it sounds like in addition to common fire safety I should:

    1. Check for leaks via corrosion and loose parts. Every season, or when it gets cleaned. There's actually a brass check valve under the cast iron burner manifold that I think is a drain for water condensation?

    2. Monitor tank pressure and the condition of the filler cap seal. I'm thinking after use and before throwing it in the back of the van, I'll let the burners get cool to the touch and then release any air left in the tank. This stove can hold a lot of fuel, but unless I plan on cooking all day, I'll only put in a quart or so at a time so there's less chance of fuel spilling out.

    3. Anything else to keep this stove from taking away my eyebrows (or worse)?

  26. #40
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    20190618_152801.jpg
    20190618_152822.jpg
    20190618_152829.jpg
    Feeling less gun-shy with this thing, I pulled it inside the shop and took some pics with it. I've been lighting it with a butane torch and haven't had any flames flare up anywhere but where they're supposed to be. It feels good to have one less rusty future project sitting in the garage!


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