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  1. #61
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    I think I paid $12 a gallon for the Coleman branded jug at Ace hardware


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro

  2. #62
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    I got the "off" brand fuel at my Wal-mart for about $8.00 a gallon. The name brand Coleman stuff was $12.00 a gallon.

    They had kerosene too, but I'd like to get that in bulk from one of our local specialty petrol places. There's one down the road that sells off-road diesel, mineral spirits, kerosene, ect. We use it in the shop to thin down 30w oil (50/50 mix in a spray bottle) to spray on parts as a general purpose rust inhibitor and lubricant.

  3. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by gbent View Post
    DeLorme rules! We took Colorado, Utah, Montana, and Wyoming on our Yellowstone trip.

    As someone who tries to stay off the superslab as much as practical, its great to know what other routes get you from here to there. To me, a good trip has more miles of back country roads than interstate.

    You will be out of cell phone reception almost all the time while in the park and surrounding areas. Hard copy maps are important.
    Generally, there is OK mobile signal along US interstates.

    There is a terrific app called ioverlander that is the schizz if you need to find a campsite. Being crowdsourced, it gets constantly updated. We have used it all over North America.

    We do a ton of car camping. We don't use any lanterns at all anymore. We use LED headlamps. By twilight time we're usually inside anyway to keep away from the mosquitoes.

    We love our National Parks. So do an astonishing number of people. Absolutely for 100% certainly sure get campsite reservations WAY ahead of time. You will not believe how crowded parks like Yellowstone or Yosemite get in the summers. Most parks have overflow areas near the entrances - some charge, some don't. Do your research.

    We do try to avoid interstates unless we're on a strict timeline. We call the back highways and state and county roads "blue highways" after the excellent book of the same name, in which the guy drove around the country using only highways that appeared blue on a map i.e. the little roads. In places like West Texas (which many find boring but we love the Chihuahuan desert so we like it) you can drive just as fast and straight on other roads as you can the interstate.

    We cook with propane in those little 1 lb. bottles. One of those lasts us about 2 weeks, you can find them anywhere, and if you are really cheap you can refill them yourself. Hint: the propane adapter to do so is available elsewhere at about half Harbor Freight's price.

    metalmagpie
    an old road dog

  4. #64
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    For the very rare occasions when I can't use a fire of random sticks, I love the Svea-made solid brass Primus stove my Dad bought from LL Bean in the 1960's. Supposedly these will burn gasoline, kerosene or #2 Diesel. IIRC the flame gets a little yellow and sooty on Diesel, never tried gas.

    Like this one Svea No. 105, 1950, brass. | Classic Camp Stoves

  5. #65
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    That little Primus stove reminds me of my Dragonfly: Dragonfly Multi-Fuel Camp Stove | MSR

    I love that little guy. Simplest contraption I've yet seen. The orifice coming out of the valve just shoots liquid fuel at the plate above it. Primes with its own fuel and once the plate gets hot, the fuel vaporizes immediately on touching it and gives a nice flame. Burns all of the above, though they recommend against unleaded gas for general usage due to the additives. Apparently ethanol is bad for the fuel can, otherwise I'm sure that would work as well.

    Re: National Parks, I've been too spoiled by back-country trips in Algonquin, Quetico, Denali, Isle Royale, a couple others. Went for a day hike in Rocky Mountain near Denver, and I was complaining to my buddy about how many other hikers there were. He told me that this area was one of the least crowded hikes he'd done in the park. I'll go a little farther and carry a little more for the luxury of a more complete wilderness experience. Had to use both hands to count the number of other groups I saw on a couple of our days on Isle Royale, it was a real bummer.

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  7. #66
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    Success! Had a good trip. Only really used the stove for breakfast while we were at Yellowstone, but no problems and it didn't even stink up the car. I also brought along a single burner propane stove that came in handy making quick meals at rest-stops along the way . We drove up to Yellowstone in 2 days spending the night in Colorado Springs, but we decided that next time we go there we'll do it in 3 days. 12-14 hours driving (not counting rest stops and meals) wears you out!

    Also visited with my brother-in-law in Utah, who brought up that these stoves are banned in Boy Scouts, and I think that's where a lot of the negative feedback I've heard stems from. Scouting isn't what it used to be, but I can see the danger factor of these stoves multiplying when you get air-headed teens horsing around with them. My Brother-in-law knows someone who had one of the Coleman stoves explode on them because one Scout leader started pumping it up while the other was playing with valves and matches, or something like that. I don't know further details, but it boiled down to too many cooks in the kitchen.


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