OT Who makes the best shop apron?
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  1. #1
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    Default OT Who makes the best shop apron?

    I wear a shop apron all the time. I like the Duluth apron with the suspenders so the weight of the apron isn't on my neck but I don't like the fact that the top bib pocket doesn't swing out when I bend over. I am forever loosing my 6" scales with them falling out. Does anybody have the perfect apron? Right now my wife is trying to repair my old Duluth apron and she is telling me it is time to buy a new one. The one good thing about the Duluth is that it is made out of heavy canvas.

    Thanks

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    Just get a few of the normal denim machinist aprons with swing pocket. They're cheap. They've worked just fine for nine zillion machinists.

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    I see Travers has Irwin brand machinist aprons on sale this month for $8.99 IIRC. They have crossover ties so the apron doesn't hang off your neck. That's what I hate about normal cheapo shop aprons.

    I have a Rockler denim apron with fancy crossover straps that is quite comfortable, but it has no swinging pocket, it's too short, and the hem likes to curl up at the bottom.

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    I have occasionally wondered how much interest there would be in an all leather apron.

    Half of my shop is devoted to leather work. I personally don't wear an apron but could easily make them.

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    I like the ones made by Dickey. Made out of heavy canvas.

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    Always wore a " boiler suit ", I always thought aprons were for ice cream salesman.

    Regards Tyrone.

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    We wear dickies here and have a service that cleans them every week. They do wear out but it takes 6 months of heavy use. Ive never worn anything else but I would say these are a good value.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tyrone Shoelaces View Post
    Always wore a " boiler suit ", I always thought aprons were for ice cream salesman.
    Regards Tyrone.
    Yes I agree, usually overalls or sometimes lab/shop coat in UK. Nowadays I have to buy my own which is a pity. I quite like the idea of a set of padded overalls for working in our unheated workshop. Probably better than wearing a fleece underneath.

    I don't really understand the US preference for aprons. Don't your clothes get oily or dirty? An apron doesn't do much for your legs and arms. What do you do when you need to do some welding?

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    Thing about aprons is they as so fast to whip on and off. Especially if customised with pop studs on right length straps instead of the standard contort behind back'n tie approach.

    Shop coat / lab coat never did it for me. Back in RARDE / DERA /DRA days was amused by class distinction. Lab rat non industrials like moi got white ones. Industrial machine shop types got brown ones. Made sneaking onto a machine for a government job over lunch break a bit tricky.

    Boiler suit / overalls would be just fine if someone figured out how to make a set you can take off with your boots on! All the ones I've had can be pulled on with greater or lesser ease over hard toe boots but getting off is another matter. Young slim hairy and flexible Clive used to manage and keep temper adequately below red line. Drives old, stiff, less hairy (but still slim) Clive temper 4 laps past cranky (aka normal) and hard into Danger UXB Nuke territory.

    For welding I use a leather welders apron. Never understood why the leather welders ones are half the price, £12 ish against £25 ish, of the ordinary shop type. Especially as they usually seem to be better made. Don't think I've ever seen a swing pocket in the UK.

    Often wondered if the folk who make this workwear stuff have ever used it. Objectively nothing ever seem to be better than not quite right / pretty crap actually standard.

    Clive

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    Quote Originally Posted by Clive603 View Post
    Often wondered if the folk who make this workwear stuff have ever used it. Objectively nothing ever seem to be better than not quite right / pretty crap actually standard.
    Clive
    I doubt they do much research. Most workwear hasn't changed in fifty years or more.

    My problem is getting something that fits. I need a large size for chest and shoulders, but that leaves the arms and legs inches too long. (Yes - deformed, I know). I ask the wife to tuck up the arms and legs to get something that works.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tyrone Shoelaces View Post
    Always wore a " boiler suit ", I always thought aprons were for ice cream salesman.

    Regards Tyrone.
    Did you wear this over your normal clothes or did you change into it at the start of the day?

    I think it would be too restrictive and too hot to be comfortable most of the time. I have one that used to wear when I worked on over the road trucks. Even then, I only wore it when I was pulling a transmission or oil pan or something nasty on the bottom side.

    Most shops in the US will provide uniforms of a shirt and pants. Guys change into them at the beginning of the day and then put their clean clothes back on when they leave.

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    Not quite sure I like the idea of coveralls and heavy canvas aprons. The thought of getting pulled into a lead screw or drive shaft isn't very enticing. I think I'll check out the Steam Punk line at Victoria's Secret. Dave [acme thread]

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    Quote Originally Posted by Adwcali View Post
    I have occasionally wondered how much interest there would be in an all leather apron.

    Half of my shop is devoted to leather work. I personally don't wear an apron but could easily make them.

    I bought one from a local leather shop. Worked great until it got real stiff, but was kind of heavy. Now I like this one from Park Tools. A local cycling shop may have one.


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    one thing you fellows from Blighty may not understand- an incredible number of US workers wear shorts and t shirts in the shop.

    Obviously, not in big factories with dress codes, but in smaller shops, particularly CNC shops, this is very common.
    I used to live in California, and pretty much every small machine shop the guys were in cargo shorts.
    Sometimes I even saw platers, wearing shorts and rubber boots.
    I know blacksmiths who wear shorts, and even a few welder/fab guys.

    Partly I think its the weather in the southern US, but I know guys up here in Washington State who, if not ordered to wear long pants by the boss, will wear shorts all year round.
    Especially if they are under 50.

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    No at all related to the OP, but for a machine shop, I think I'd go with an apron.

    But working on equipment, rigging, rolling arround in the dirt with nasty oily things, overalls every time.

    Dad was oilfeild, so I just grew up wearing them.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ries View Post
    one thing you fellows from Blighty may not understand- an incredible number of US workers wear shorts and t shirts in the shop.
    I understand that you do this, but am envious that you can. Last few days the temperature in work has been 1-5 degrees Centigrade and a fair bit of wind blowing through. We have no heating at all. I was doing a job on our DSG where the chips were coming off blue all day long. The combination of the cold and the hot chips would make shorts and tee shirts more than a little impractical. I need boots, jeans, tee shirt, top shirt, fleece, woolly hat and overalls to keep happy.

    Admittedly the lack of heating is a little unusual, but by no means unique. It does get warmer in the Summer - maybe a month or so of it if it stops raining.

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    I've never worked in a shop that allowed the guys to wear shorts.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ewlsey View Post
    Did you wear this over your normal clothes or did you change into it at the start of the day?

    I think it would be too restrictive and too hot to be comfortable most of the time. I have one that used to wear when I worked on over the road trucks. Even then, I only wore it when I was pulling a transmission or oil pan or something nasty on the bottom side.

    Most shops in the US will provide uniforms of a shirt and pants. Guys change into them at the beginning of the day and then put their clean clothes back on when they leave.

    I wore decent street clothes to work. At work in my early days I'd change into an old rugby shirt or tee shirt and old jeans then pull my overalls on over the top of those. Changed back again at night. If it was winter time I'd wear a sweater also.

    Later on I discovered ex German army shirts and trousers and I wore them under my overalls. The baggy army trousers were great for crouching and kneeling.

    I once worked on a gearbox repair job in a chocolate factory at the height of our summer, baking hot. I just wore my underpants under my overalls. I could have wrung my overalls out every night on that job.
    No open windows and steam heated conches ( huge chocolate mixing machines ) all around us. I couldn't eat chocolate for a year after that job !

    Regards Tyrone.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mud View Post

    Seems like a good design but I looked on their website and it's quite short.

    Not sure about this brand, but this is they style I like.
    globe-int | Rakuten Global Market: BEN DAVIS BENDAVIS Ben Davis apron 566 denim work apron work wear work clothing MACHINIST APRON senior day 2P5Oct15

    Denim, swing pocket, sides pull in and tie in the back.


    I think canvas or leather are total overkill for a machinist apron. There's no need for the extra weight and durability unless you do more fab/welder type shit. Denim breaths pretty well and is plenty durable for a machine shop. Plus they're very cheap so if you do wear it out, toss it and put on a new one. I think this is one of those deals were the cheap and simple solution is best.

  28. #20
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    I have the Ben Davis one and have no complaints. I had my wife extend the ties so I can tie it in the front which I prefer.


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