OT why does my pendulum wall clock keep stopping?
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    Default OT why does my pendulum wall clock keep stopping?

    OK,

    Have a wall clock, two weights on chains one for running clock and one for chime.

    Pendulum arm about 20” long.

    Clock was working fine, took it off wall and removed pendulum to paint the wall.

    Gently slid arm off the small mechanism with a flat spring.

    Put it back on the wall, and the pendulum stops after a few minutes, it just swings slower and slower until it stops.

    The clock tilts forward at top due to hook on wall, have packed a bit of folded tissue under bottom edge to sit it more perpendicular to the wall. Have tilted it side to side in both directions as well but it still will not run.

    Have took it off wall gently blown out any dust but not really seen any dust inside, put small drop of clock oil with a needle on shaft ends, put it back up but no luck.

    The small flat spring where pendulum connects to does not look as if it has any cracks.

    Know nothing about clocks so trying for any suggestins here.

    Thanks

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    what color did you paint the wall?

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    I'd start by leveling it with an actual level. Some are quite fussy. Listen for the tick and tock intervals to be equal.

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    There's a whole trade/craft devoted to answering that question. With each swing the escapement (the ticking) is suppose to impart a little energy to the pendulum to keep it going. They're more a less design so there isn't a lot of extra available beyond what the pendulum needs so it runs as long as possible. So lots of little things can add up to make that not work

    When was the last time it was serviced? Mechanical clocks should be serviced, which is basically disassembly, clean inspect everything and oil, every few years, but I suspect this rarely happens. One guess is a combo of dirty, wear, lack of oil etc had it almost ready to stop and moving things about finalized that.

    If you decide to take it apart, remember the spring(s) have to let down before disassembly.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Larry Dickman View Post
    what color did you paint the wall?
    Magnolia same as it was before, a neutral colour.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Conrad Hoffman View Post
    I'd start by leveling it with an actual level. Some are quite fussy. Listen for the tick and tock intervals to be equal.
    Thanks, yes started with it level, then went a little each way off level.

    It was a little off level anticlockwise before to get it to work without stopping.

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    I've heard an ugly woman can stop a clock. Might I suggest you do nothing until the holiday visitors leave?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mcgyver View Post
    There's a whole trade/craft devoted to answering that question. With each swing the escapement (the ticking) is suppose to impart a little energy to the pendulum to keep it going. They're more a less design so there isn't a lot of extra available beyond what the pendulum needs so it runs as long as possible. So lots of little things can add up to make that not work

    When was the last time it was serviced? Mechanical clocks should be serviced, which is basically disassembly, clean inspect everything and oil, every few years, but I suspect this rarely happens. One guess is a combo of dirty, wear, lack of oil etc had it almost ready to stop and moving things about finalized that.

    If you decide to take it apart, remember the spring(s) have to let down before disassembly.
    That is what I will have to do.

    There is a clockmaker 12 miles away that does nickel plating, Been there for plating a few times.

    He does antique clocks, this one is not old 1970’s but he will be able to take it apart.

    I have taken the whole inside out of the case, looking between the two side plates at the mechanism nothing looks worn, and no real dust inside.

    Cannot see springs like a wind up clock, I assume it works by the weights on the two chains.

    Thanks

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    Quote Originally Posted by GregSY View Post
    I've heard an ugly woman can stop a clock. Might I suggest you do nothing until the holiday visitors leave?
    Sorry, I’m a miserable old git not one comes to visit me.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mcgyver View Post

    When was the last time it was serviced? Mechanical clocks should be serviced, which is basically disassembly, clean inspect everything and oil, every few years, but I suspect this rarely happens. One guess is a combo of dirty, wear, lack of oil etc had it almost ready to stop and moving things about finalized that.
    .
    Would they have used a trich tank and used fumes to clean the mechanism in the past?

    Some years ago early1980’s I bought a button lathe from a clock maker, they were based in Hemel Hempstead, Hertfordshire.

    Name was Griffin, they had a small Griffin logo on the clock face, they were closing down and selling everything off.

    There were several trich tanks in the workshop.

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    Quote Originally Posted by lionelt View Post
    Would they have used a trich tank and used fumes to clean the mechanism in the past?
    .
    not to my knowledge, but doesn't mean its not so. Perhaps it was part of his plating activities?

    Most use ultrasonic cleaners. The better clock repairers take it all apart, where as the poor ones put the whole moment in the tank. You don't get it clean that way (its primarily the bearings surfaces you a trying to clean) and you can't inspect those surfaces. The pivots (think journal bearing) should be bright and smooth and the and holes they go in should be round. Common problems, that you can't see without disassembly are the pivots are worn (need reburnishing) and holes oblong (need bushing).

    I'm not much past advanced beginner myself, but a machining background gives one a huge advantage in taking on clock and watch work. Still lots learn though, and tools to acquire lol

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    Bushing elongated holes had come to mind, I had considered thats what might need doing.

    I have a couple of ultrasonic cleaners so might be worth a try to see if that might work.

    It was bought about 1975 so 45 years old, never been serviced as up until now it always worked, but was always temperamental if taken down and moved.

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    Wife has an old mantle clock. Family heirloom. Worth a couple hundred tops. Wind up pendulum, not weights. Any way, it stared getting iffy. Took it to the little old clock maker. He said "I'll call you". He did. Said there was bad news, good news, and bad news. Bad news was it was worn out. Good news was he could re-bush all the shaft holes and it would be good to go. Bad news was it would cost $350.
    Wife looks at me with big puppy dog eyes.
    What would you do?
    Good luck with your clock............Bob

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    Quote Originally Posted by bhigdog View Post
    Wife looks at me with big puppy dog eyes.
    What would you do?
    Good luck with your clock............Bob
    I bought this clock for my wife first Christmas after we met.

    It chimes on hour and half hour, that is what she misses, plus the sentimental connection.

    Professional repair would probably make more sense.

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    At that age, the lubricant is all dried out, and some of the pivot holes may be elongated. At 3 or 4 hours or more shop time it will cost probably more than it Is worth to put it in good running order. If you want to to a crude but possibly effective job, take the movement out and lube all the pivots with a low viscosity oil. Just a bit on each bearing surface and a tiny bit on the escape wheel. No oil on the gears. When you put it back on the wall, try to set it so that the interval between the tick and the rock is the same. It will then be in beat.

    To do a proper job, the movement needs to be taken apart and the parts cleaned well in a clock cleaning solution. All the pivot holes need to be pegged out with suitable peg wood, and any elongated holes bushed to fit the polished pivots. Over time the lubricant tends to evaporate or polymerize, and the remaining goop mixes with dust and accelerates the wearing action. If you take it to a shop, try to find someone with an American Watchmakers-Clockmakers Institute certification.

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    Lion,
    Competent service would definitely find any problem. But there are a couple things you might try first. Oil with a proper clock oil. Not any ordinary thin oil, a proper oil suitable for mechanical movements is very thin and does not dry out like ordinary oil, or at least it takes many years. Just a teeny tiny drop at each pivot.

    Then make sure the timing is correct. That's where I'd start since it ran before you took it down to paint. Using a level to time it only works if it was originally timed with a level. I normally time wall clocks by tilting slightly from one side to the other until the timing between the tick and tock is as near the same as possible. If that leaves the clock tilted noticeably, there are usually internal adjustments to compensate but that gets more involved. Depending on the quality or sophistication of the movement, there are a number of common internal timing adjustments. Some are as simple as bending the rod which supports the pendulum and drives the escapement.

    Another common problem which occurs when clocks are taken down or removed is that the pendulum support rod is not inserted in the escapement fork correctly. But that should be obvious since then, normally, it would only tick or tock, not both. You've said that you checked the pendulum support leaf on which the pendulum swings. If that is not cracked, it should run.
    Jim

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    If it is “trying” to run and stops, it probably needs clean/oil. If it doesn’t even “try”, check the weights and chains to make sure they are hung correctly and free. If the chains are linked/hung up, there is
    No power to the movement.
    OT why does my pendulum wall clock keep stopping?


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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    A level is useless to most pendulum clocks. Allow your pendulum to hang stationary. Use something to mark the location. Now gently move the pendulum to each side, measuring the distance to center when you hear the tick or tock. Those positions should be the same distance from center. Tilt case as necessary.

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    I can usually get them going for awhile.
    Not an expert at all, but read a little, there seems to be two schools of thought. Oil on the pivots, or no oil.
    I use a small brush, and a banned solvent applied to the pivots and sucked up with pith until clean, then apply clock oil with a dipper, then remove the excess with a piece of pith..that part is important, or the works gets gummy quickly. I have one clock that runs much better with no oil.
    Should be able to get it running with out taking it apart, unless the escapement lever is worn.

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    Quote Originally Posted by lionelt View Post
    I bought this clock for my wife first Christmas after we met.

    It chimes on hour and half hour, that is what she misses, plus the sentimental connection.

    Professional repair would probably make more sense.
    Yup. Exactly the same with me and my wife and her clock. I did pay to get it repaired. It now runs and chimes like new. My wife is happy. Money well spent......Bob


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