OT why does my pendulum wall clock keep stopping? - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    Forgot to mention. Sometimes weight driven clocks have a heavier weight for the running train than the striking train. Sometimes weights get interchanged, resulting in a stop.

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    How old is the clock and how long has it been running?
    If its modern (post wwII) and has been running for more than 20 years the movement probably needs to be relpaced. Modern clocks are, in general, not worth trying to repair.
    This sort of thing happens all the time. A clock that has been running for a long time will misbehave after being moved. The obvious answer is that the clock was damaged somehow, but not necessarily. Clocks wear extremely slowly, so moving it can expose a fault that was ready to occur.
    Things to double check before giving up:
    - Make sure the chains are properly hanging on the pulleys.
    -check that the pendulum is hanging right and the leader is engaged with the crutch.
    -check the beat. The tic and toc should be equal. It can be hard to hear as the 2 sound different which obscures the comparison.

    Good Luck,
    Mr Stretch
    Post-grad and professional development diplomas in Antique clock conservation from West Dean College, UK '05 & '06.

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    Don't bother with oiling the clock.
    Oil should not make the difference between a clock running or not and over-oiling a clock is worse than under oiling.
    The purpose of oil in a clock is to slow down bushing wear and to slightly reduce the friction of the spinning arbors by forming a small meniscus between the back of the plate and the square pivot shoulder so the the arbor floats between the plates. Adding more oil will cause it to run down the plate away from the pivot and possibly end up somewhere where you don't want it like the leaves of a pinion below.

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    FWIW here's what a clockmaker friend of mine used to do with stopped wrist watches (not electronic!): Dip in kerosene and hang up to dry. No oil, as the old oil is still there but you get rid of the dust.
    I'm no expert but felt I had to chime in, so to speak.
    fusker

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    Listen to it.

    The tick and rock should be consistent timed March.

    If it sounds like it is stuttering where it is fast.slow it is out of beat or not level.

    The interface between pendulum and clock often is a slip fit to allow adjustment and when you lifted the pendulum you may have bumped it.

    You can tilt the clock on the wall to see if the sound changes.

    You also may have knocked the interface loose.

    Visit the watch and clock collectors forum and look for the area related to your type of clock.

    It is what they do...

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G930A using Tapatalk

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    BTW, if you happen to be a machinist, it's not rocket science to rebush a worn hole. You want to preserve the location. The info is out there if you search.

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    Quote Originally Posted by fusker View Post
    FWIW here's what a clockmaker friend of mine used to do with stopped wrist watches (not electronic!): Dip in kerosene and hang up to dry. No oil, as the old oil is still there but you get rid of the dust.
    I'm no expert but felt I had to chime in, so to speak.
    fusker

    lol, that chime might be a clunk. That might work if tyring get something moving for a $5 sale at a flea market, but however great a guy and friend he is, as far as watches go, stay far away from him.

    You have to take it part to clean and oil properly, the crap ends up in suspension with the oil, it all has to go....that's in the case when there still is oil. Alternatively the oils is completely dried up and gone. Oiling a watch is a very specific thing needing just the right amount, to much and it will run away (it relies on the surface tension to hold it in place). You use the right oil on the right part. Then, often minute amounts of caked on dirt is in the jewels and needs to be work out carefully with peg wood. Cleaning itself can be done by hand but mostly you use special solutions and machines (or ultrasonic cleaners) and a few cycles of cleaning then a rise. It takes some skill, effort and equipment to service a watch - meaning perfectly clean and correctly oiled.

    Equally important, without disassembly you cannot inspect for all the things that might need repair, cracked jewel, scored pivot etc

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    Quote Originally Posted by fusker View Post
    FWIW here's what a clockmaker friend of mine used to do with stopped wrist watches (not electronic!): Dip in kerosene and hang up to dry. No oil, as the old oil is still there but you get rid of the dust.
    I'm no expert but felt I had to chime in, so to speak.
    fusker
    Ewwww......Kerosene, hang to dry, leave old oil in? Just....Ewww.....

    Him, above, and any dude that attacks a clock plate with a punch to close up the holes, are two folks worth knowing about in advance, and avoiding if at all possible. Better the clock never run again, than be butchered.

    Bushing clock plates, and repivotting the wheels if the pivots are worn, is not exactly rocket science, but it, like so many things, requires some modicum of understanding and not a little bit of Craft in the doer.

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    Thanks for all the suggestions.

    I now have the clock running again.

    This morning I took off the two weights and put them on the scales.

    Left weight for the chimes was 1331 grams and the right weight for the clock was 1323 grams. I swapped them putting the heavier 1323 gram weight on the clock chain and it has been running all day since 11:00 this morning, 22:25 hrs now.

    Looks like I had the weights on wrong way around when I put the clock back on the wall.

    8 grams must make a difference to the clock mechanism.

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    Quote Originally Posted by lionelt View Post
    Thanks for all the suggestions.

    I now have the clock running again.

    This morning I took off the two weights and put them on the scales.

    Left weight for the chimes was 1331 grams and the right weight for the clock was 1323 grams. I swapped them putting the heavier 1323 gram weight on the clock chain and it has been running all day since 11:00 this morning, 22:25 hrs now.

    Looks like I had the weights on wrong way around when I put the clock back on the wall.

    8 grams must make a difference to the clock mechanism.
    I think something else "got right" in the messing around, 8 or even 80 grams wouldn't make the difference.

    Biggest problem I used to see when I was a pup doing housecalls with the old man was out of beat as mentioned above, think "tic.....tock'tic ....tock'tic" instead of "tic-toc tic-toc". For wall clock it's usually a matter of shifting the case a few degrees how it sits.

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    My pendulum clock - same, moved it then it quit. Sprayed the inner works with WD-40 then it worked.

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    friction!

    It's everywhere!

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    Quote Originally Posted by lionelt View Post

    8 grams must make a difference to the clock mechanism.
    I was just curious. Is it the actual amount of weight, or does there need to be a slight differential? Otherwise, what would be the reason for making the 2 weights Almost the same?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Larry Dickman View Post
    I was just curious. Is it the actual amount of weight, or does there need to be a slight differential? Otherwise, what would be the reason for making the 2 weights Almost the same?

    I don't think there is any reason, manufacturing variance? One powers the train/escapement/pendulum and the other the chime mechanism, they're independent.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Larry Dickman View Post
    I was just curious. Is it the actual amount of weight, or does there need to be a slight differential? Otherwise, what would be the reason for making the 2 weights Almost the same?
    Castings?

    I have seen rocks wrapped in fence wire used to run a clock. The amount of weight 'can' be calculated, but when it is 'enough' it is bound to stop sooner than if it is somewhat erring to the side of extra.

    I doubt that the difference in the weight of the weights, had near so much to do with the clock running again, as the handling and jiggling around of the works did as the weights were being played with.

    How long will you run your car or truck without changing the oil? Or do you just add oil to make it 'Full' again?

    The oil in a clock is exposed to the dust in the air, is oxidized by the air itself, and the dust, when it does contaminate the oil, forms a grinding paste that eventually will cause the pivots to eat the holes in the clock plates well out of round, in some cases the pivot cuts a path across the clock plate.

    Repairing pivots and bushing the plates is not nearly so cheap and easy as a cleaning and re-oiling of the clock.

    Take your clock in for an oil change once in a while. It will last a LOT longer!

    Cheers
    Trev

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    "Brexit"...… Don't ask


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