Pratt & Whitney 1/9" gage block? (.111111")
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  1. #1
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    Default Pratt & Whitney 1/9" gage block? (.111111")

    For what reason would Pratt & Whitney make a 1/9" gage block?

    New Pratt & Whitney 1/9” .111111” Gage block One Ninth Of An Inch -New Old Stock | eBay

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    Quote Originally Posted by apestate View Post
    For what reason would Pratt & Whitney make a 1/9" gage block?

    New Pratt & Whitney 1/9” .111111” Gage block One Ninth Of An Inch -New Old Stock | eBay
    When 1/8 just won't do.....

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    It's for people who can't agree between fractional inches or decimal inches.

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    ??? It's right there in the text of that listing:
    This was not a standard part of any gage block set, these were made in small batches for special orders when the odd fraction of 1/9” of an inch had to be set up.
    Which of P&W customers might have had some job 50 years that required a 1/9" reference? How the heck should we know, I ask politely? If someone asserted here that this was for a very tight tolerance secondary operation on turboencabulators, so very critical to the War effort, and the swivel boss to dribbler bore distance simply could not be established without this custom gage block, how would you disbelieve that (hopefully self-evident) drivel?

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    Now I kind of want a pi gage bock, no reason.

    Sent from my SM-G930R4 using Tapatalk

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    Perhaps for the printing trade?

    The pica, a measurement in typesetting, is 1/6 of an inch or .16666667

    1/9 of an inch or .1111111 is 2/3 of a pica.

    Mike

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    The point, also used in typography, is 1/72" (72=8*9) in US usage. (Slightly different in size in other national usages.)

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    I suggested a thread checker. I have a pile of oddball gage blocks from Starrett that mostly resolve to a thread pitch. Never found a thread or gear checked that used them, though I remain hopeful.

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    Quote Originally Posted by sfriedberg View Post
    ??? It's right there in the text of that listing:

    Which of P&W customers might have had some job 50 years that required a 1/9" reference? How the heck should we know, I ask politely? If someone asserted here that this was for a very tight tolerance secondary operation on turboencabulators, so very critical to the War effort, and the swivel boss to dribbler bore distance simply could not be established without this custom gage block, how would you disbelieve that (hopefully self-evident) drivel?
    JR would approve.
    J

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    I just rummaged through my gage blocks and I have all sorts that would have to be for a thread or gear comparator - .42857 (or 3/7), .33333 (3/9), .27273 (3/11), etc. About 12 in all giving pitches of 7,9,11,14,16,18,28,36,44,64,etc.

    I have others that are just strange - 5/64, 3/32, 7/64 and those .100025, .100050 and .100075. Basically the front row in the 81+ piece set from Starrett... I understand them but I've never needed to use them.

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    Something related to a 9 TPI thread is what comes to mind. Perhaps spacing for a multiple point threading tool? Or checking the pitch of a cut thread?

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    Old Stock.

    Odd size.

    $49.99 starting price.

    No "Make Offer" option.

    Less than two days left and ZERO bids.

    They need to get real. A starting price of $1 will probably get them $5 or $10 for it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by EPAIII View Post
    Something related to a 9 TPI thread is what comes to mind. Perhaps spacing for a multiple point threading tool? Or checking the pitch of a cut thread?
    If it's like the ones I have that are 3/x this one would be 3/27. 27tpi is a lot more common in my world than 9.

    I'm wondering if there are any 60 degree points that would wring onto a gage block, I know I have some points but I think they're offset and not perfectly split...

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    Perhaps to calibrate a shrink rule, where 1' 1/9" ended up being 1' after casting?? The 9 tpi thread seems a more likely bet.

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    Seller also has another one listed as
    New Pratt & Whitney 3/80” .037500” Gage block Three Eightieths Of An Inch

    Figure that one out?

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    Wait a second here!!! This block is marked with 6 decimal places, which means it is accurate to 1 micron or better!!! In theory...
    That is better than grade 00 blocks today...
    https://www.mitutoyo.com/wp-content/...age-Blocks.pdf

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    Looks like it didn't sell. Zero bids.

    Big surprise!

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    Yeah, having 1 block even of high precision is kind of useless... Especially when you can get chinese made 81 piece set for $80 new.
    Talking about 1 micro inch accuracy is all fun and stuff, but really, at that point you are talking about optical flats and counting fringes. For actual measuring of things you build, 100 micro inches is good enough for 99% of things anyone will ever do.

    Now I am sure someone will come up with example where 100 micro inches is not good enough. You are the 1%.

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    The thing is, gauge blocks are usually used not in one-sies, but rather in stacks of several blocks in order to obtain the value needed. And then the tolerances can add together so 100 can become 200 or 300 or more. Pretty soon you are talking real errors in a practical world.

    I think it is the odd ball size that makes it less desirable.



    Quote Originally Posted by pcm81 View Post
    Yeah, having 1 block even of high precision is kind of useless... Especially when you can get chinese made 81 piece set for $80 new.
    Talking about 1 micro inch accuracy is all fun and stuff, but really, at that point you are talking about optical flats and counting fringes. For actual measuring of things you build, 100 micro inches is good enough for 99% of things anyone will ever do.

    Now I am sure someone will come up with example where 100 micro inches is not good enough. You are the 1%.


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