Prices on 30+ year old machines - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    If everything is in extremely good condition (little old lady only used them to machine prayer book holders on Sundays and she also won a lifetime supply of LPS2 in a raffle) then at the top end I see $15k there. But since the newest thing is 30 years old, I rather doubt everything is in extremely good condition.

    Sight unseen, $10k seems more realistic.

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  3. #22
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    Hire a certified Machine Tool Appraiser. That way you can take that info to your bank for collateral if needed.

    Contact Us | Association of Machinery and Equipment Appraisers

  4. #23
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    I don’t know much about these machines other than the Bridgeport and Supermax since my shop has a BP and had a Supermax Neither are of much good use either when it comes to production. So as it seems the machines are no use to you since you’re a farmer I suggest not even buying them just have them clear the space and rent to someone else also CNC machines are very different from farm equipment, consider investing the money your thinking about pretty much pissing in the wind on what you know. That might've sounded a bit harsh but that’s basically what you’re doing if you buy these machines when your profession and line of work is farming.

  5. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oldscooloperator View Post
    I don’t know much about these machines other than the Bridgeport and Supermax since my shop has a BP and had a Supermax Neither are of much good use either when it comes to production. So as it seems the machines are no use to you since you’re a farmer I suggest not even buying them just have them clear the space and rent to someone else also CNC machines are very different from farm equipment, consider investing the money your thinking about pretty much pissing in the wind on what you know. That might've sounded a bit harsh but that’s basically what you’re doing if you buy these machines when your profession and line of work is farming.
    Damn. Got it. And "in one". Might want to re-asses your career goals, yah?

    Bean counter hat on.

    You price against their value - if any - as alternatives to the machines your business plan has been professionally, independently, and objectively vetted to actually need to hit its numbers. Same as buying more acreage or new ag equipment.

    No business. No plan. No purpose. No value. Black hole of a money-pit, rather.

    Michigan ain't the place to operate a "petting zoo" for tired machinery. Ticket sales just won't cover staff costs, regulatory filings, safety upgrades, insurance, and such.

    Negotiation proceeds to how soon he gets them out of your space, or how much you will charge for storage whilst HE - or an agent he is responsible for - finds buyers, or how much above actual out-of-pocket you will charge for managing their disposal if he runs out the clock, unsold.

    Anything less arm's length // more friendly-intimate?

    See a shrink or a marriage counselor.

    Banker won't want to know.

    Professional "raider" of a Manager at-large will take the farm, stick you with the fossilized machines, double the rent for their space.

    Tough world? You did say Michigan?

    And rose-coloured spectacles?

    Not meant for YOU, Pilgrim:

    1pcs Chicken Eyes Glasses Avoid Hen peck each other chicken farm 55mm | eBay

  6. #25
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    As others have said value to you for business purposes is purely determined by return on investment.

    However when it comes to low priced equipment conventional asset worth thinking often goes right out of the window. Especially if the thing in question isn't eating up rental space that can best be utilised by something more profitable. Doesn't take long for a £2,000 machine to earn its price back after which its pretty much all pure profit.

    On that basis three similar vertical machines may well be worth keeping simply from the time saved by having different sets of basic work holding mounted and aligned. What you have there is pretty much only good for onesey - twosey and repair style work so set-up is what burns up the time. Any one who has swopped vices, rotary table and clamp to table set-ups on a Bridgeport a few time in a week will know exactly what I mean!

    At the low end its all about jobs done per working week, "if the spindle isn't turning you're not earning". Overhead time is the killer for micro-businesses.

    Mostly home shoppable kit too which will pretty much always have some value so long as it isn't broke.

    Clive

  7. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by MS224 View Post
    The machines are already in place. Previous owner was renting space from us so no cost in moving.

    Employee that operated machines is also in place.

    I'm a farmer so understand business and know that if they're not working they're not making me money.

    What I meant by bits was drill bits, maybe just should've used the term tooling and nothing else.

    I appreciate all the comments and opinions, keep them coming if you have anything to add. Thanks!
    If you are planning on keeping the employee on as your employee, you do need to have tools for him to work with. I suspect that having a machinist in your back pocket is a pretty good deal for a farmer. In a critical time, he could save you thousands of dollars in lost time elsewhere in your operation. That Summit lathe, while not overly large, is a pretty decent machine in a repair shop.

    We're also guessing about what kind of relationship you want to continue with the seller. If he's going to still be around, and you don't want to chisel him, AND you need to have a machine shop for an employee, then you'd want to be more generous in the offer.

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    Plus if the owner is moving on to other pastures then you need to know why this shop does not pay its own way...
    Perhaps it does and the owner is retiring...

  9. #28
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    I am interested in how this is all going to mesh with farming or maybe not at all. You don't want to buy a business, just machines. And you have a machinist that can go with the machines.

    This is how I see it. You are a hobbyist and want to play with the machines. For that you may not want or need a resident machinist. You are a big enough farmer that this is for maintenance of the farm machinery. Don't need old production machinery for that, a lathe, a mill and a grinder would be just fine. You want to start your own small business. How would these machines fit into the business plan.

    From where I sit, sounds like you have been given an opportunity to buy some toys on the cheap and have no real use for them.

    Tom

  10. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by TDegenhart View Post
    I am interested in how this is all going to mesh with farming or maybe not at all. You don't want to buy a business, just machines. And you have a machinist that can go with the machines.

    This is how I see it. You are a hobbyist and want to play with the machines. For that you may not want or need a resident machinist. You are a big enough farmer that this is for maintenance of the farm machinery. Don't need old production machinery for that, a lathe, a mill and a grinder would be just fine. You want to start your own small business. How would these machines fit into the business plan.

    From where I sit, sounds like you have been given an opportunity to buy some toys on the cheap and have no real use for them.

    Tom
    It certainly seems so. Machines are one thing, but taking on an employee is another. He would need workers compensation insurance, paychecks, withholding reporting and paying out. possibly premises liability insurance and so on. With one employee, he would be exempt from OSHA inspections, but if there is an injury, there are reports to be made. Seems like a lot of trouble if it's a hobby with no product. JMO

  11. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Newman109 View Post
    Seems like a lot of trouble if it's a hobby with no product. JMO
    Waddyah mean "no project"?

    Ever try to make truly mysterious, world-class crop circles FAST so as to get back to other work without first building a decent flying saucer?

    Too much like work, done on foot with rakes.


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  13. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by thermite View Post
    Waddyah mean "no project"?

    Ever try to make truly mysterious, world-class crop circles FAST so as to get back to other work without first building a decent flying saucer?

    Too much like work, done on foot with rakes.

    Crop circles! How could I have missed that?

  14. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Newman109 View Post
    Crop circles! How could I have missed that?
    Runnin' yer hot air balloon at too low an altitude, 'coz I was offline for a nap, most likely.

    Should have more lift by now. Mind the powerlines. Brunchtime here..



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