Purpose of these unusual large angle/height blocks?
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    Default Purpose of these unusual large angle/height blocks?

    There are two boxed sets, each block 1” x 3” x variable height, aluminum, two transverse holes per block. Each block has three heights in steps for various angles. These are shop-made. Edit: note that each step is marked on top with a whole number of degrees. My use of “height” may have been confusing. All angles 1-45 degrees are represented by at least one step. Each block has three steps, each 2 degrees apart.
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    My guess is they are use for making quick setups with a height gauge.

    Think of them as custom gauge blocks with hight built in so you don't have to stack blocks together.

    pre-set height blocks are my guess

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    I wouldn't think someone would make gauge blocks out of aluminum but I can't think of any other use for them offhand.

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    "Legs" for a large sine plate is what comes to mind with the degrees stamped into them.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob F. View Post
    "Legs" for a large sine plate is what comes to mind with the degrees stamped into them.
    That's what I would say, also.

    If you gave us a couple of the heights with the number of degrees stamped on them, we could figure out if that would work, and what length sine bar would be needed.

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    Quote Originally Posted by awander View Post
    That's what I would say, also.

    If you gave us a couple of the heights with the number of degrees stamped on them, we could figure out if that would work, and what length sine bar would be needed.
    Thanks, yes it looks like these are legs for a 10” base sine plate. 9 deg. G =1.569”; 40 deg. G =6.435”, both per HF digital caliper which happened to be close. The legs are a bit off (couldn’t be my measurements!) because C = 10.057” vs. 10.023”. I expect the tools were close enough for that shop’s application. Now I’ll take another look thru those tons of stuff to see if there isn’t a 10” sine plate in the pile somewhere.

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    Quote Originally Posted by crossthread View Post
    I wouldn't think someone would make gauge blocks out of aluminum but I can't think of any other use for them offhand.
    Well not gage blocks, but "step" blocks or whatever, especially larger ones would get pretty heavy out of steel... or you invest alot of time drilling holes or whatnot...

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    Since these blocks are for use with 10” sine bar, I’m going to buy one. The old style of sine bars, like this, TAFT PEIRCE SINE BAR 10" NO. 9116 10.000" CS-141-47 COMMERCIAL | eBay
    all seem to push $200. But the newer style, with both cylinders at ends under the bar, cab be cheaper. Can I do anything with the old ones that you can’t do with the newer ones?

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    I don't think it's old-vs-new, but rather thin-vs-thick. That Taft Peirce bag clearly can be clamped onto the side of things, where a more conventional sine bar cannot.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cannonmn View Post
    There are two boxed sets, each block 1” x 3” x variable height, aluminum, two transverse holes per block. Each block has three heights in steps for various angles. These are shop-made. Edit: note that each step is marked on top with a whole number of degrees. My use of “height” may have been confusing. All angles 1-45 degrees are represented by at least one step. Each block has three steps, each 2 degrees apart.
    Solved some prior Plgrim's production setup challenge. or he thought it would. Or he just had a lack of "project?"

    No one as knows anything about measuring stuff would use shiney-wood. It simply moves too much.

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    Quote Originally Posted by sfriedberg View Post
    I don't think it's old-vs-new, but rather thin-vs-thick. That Taft Peirce bag clearly can be clamped onto the side of things, where a more conventional sine bar cannot.

    Thanks, I definitely want the clamp-to-side capability, and that was at the root of my question. Was looking at how such a bar is clamped onto an angle iron at the complementary angle, which is then turned 90 degrees to get good accuracy at high angles.

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    Quote Originally Posted by sfriedberg View Post
    I don't think it's old-vs-new, but rather thin-vs-thick. That Taft Peirce bag clearly can be clamped onto the side of things, where a more conventional sine bar cannot.

    Ok, need a bit more clarification; consider this modern example: Sine Bar | 57-020-222 | Travers Tool Co., Inc.

    It is 10” x 1” x 1”. The only significant dimension where the old Taft-P. Bar clearly exceeds the Travers example is the “height” or z, pictured with both cylinders on horizontal plane. Some I see in the Travers style are 1 1/4” wide, probably wider than the Taft-P.

    Pls explain where the Travers style would fall short, if it would, in the side-clamping situation. There must be a reason why the Taft-style seems to have been abandoned globally, I can’t find a single new one.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cannonmn View Post
    Ok, need a bit more clarification; consider this modern example: Sine Bar | 57-020-222 | Travers Tool Co., Inc.

    It is 10” x 1” x 1”. The only significant dimension where the old Taft-P. Bar clearly exceeds the Travers example is the “height” or z, pictured with both cylinders on horizontal plane. Some I see in the Travers style are 1 1/4” wide, probably wider than the Taft-P.

    Pls explain where the Travers style would fall short, if it would, in the side-clamping situation. There must be a reason why the Taft-style seems to have been abandoned globally, I can’t find a single new one.
    Sine plate or bar is not necssarily still in place when cutting starts. Grinding, perhaps, but see-also magnetic goods.

    Goal is to use its superior capability to make the setup accurately, block, brace, jack, shim, wedge, clamp, cut custom .. all of the above for the work to HOLD that angle in the cut once stressed.

    Verifiy it, then withdraw the sine equipment to preserve its reliabilty, undamaged, as a measuring and setting aid, not as a tilt-table, directly.

    Safely asided until the next need for it, IOW.

    When one CAN do, of course.

    Mind - your tools, your rules, as "time" carries a far higher "burden' as well as costing more money than it once did.

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