Recommendation for Automatic Compressor Drain
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  1. #1
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    Default Recommendation for Automatic Compressor Drain

    Can anyone recommend a good automatic compressor drain for my home shop 5 HP Quincy compressor?

    I don't know anything about them, and could use some guidance.

    I did find this one at MSC, but no idea if it is good choice or not.

    https://www.mscdirect.com/product/details/02178473

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    Mine is from Eaton compressors and I’ve been happy with it. They have some 3rd party models and I’m sure they would set you up if you called them.

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    The MSC unit is good, we have them on several air compressors here.
    I have a couple that have been in continuous use for about 5 years with no problems.
    Cycle time is adjustable for both drain cycle time(how often it blows off/drains) and duration of drain cycle( how long it drains).
    There are several of the same design on the market, in fact most look identical even though there different manufacturers.

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    Am I the only one that always ends up with crap stuck in the valve and it leaking? Seem to have happened on every auto blowdown I've had on every compressor

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hardplates View Post
    Am I the only one that always ends up with crap stuck in the valve and it leaking? Seem to have happened on every auto blowdown I've had on every compressor
    Nope. You are not alone.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hardplates View Post
    Am I the only one that always ends up with crap stuck in the valve and it leaking? Seem to have happened on every auto blowdown I've had on every compressor

    Mine are the float and needle needle valve types and I wadded up some window screen and stuck it in the short pipe fitting attaching it.
    That helped but still every 3-4 years of 24/7/365 use I have to clean it out.
    I've wondered if these electric valve type have the same problem or do they open enough to blow out the rust particles with the air.
    Bob

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    Quote Originally Posted by CarbideBob View Post
    Mine are the float and needle needle valve types and I wadded up some window screen and stuck it in the short pipe fitting attaching it.
    That helped but still every 3-4 years of 24/7/365 use I have to clean it out.
    I've wondered if these electric valve type have the same problem or do they open enough to blow out the rust particles with the air.
    Bob
    I've only run electric and have that problem. I do have a 1" NPT one that I was thinking about trying with the theory the crap should fit through just fine. It always sticks open when I don't have the time to play around with it and the compressor is in a building next to my shop so its out of sight out of mind when it is working correctly.....I'll have to write it on the whiteboard

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    I have a Moisture Minder (pneumatic/mechanical) auto drain valve on my 5HP Quincy and it works well for my purposes.

    Mike

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    BTDT

    simply remote the drain line to a ball valve (above the bottom level so rust doesn't sit and rust the ball) usually on the wall, then send it outside, for convenience, or so you can easily put a bucket under it.

    If it's hard to do, you'll never doo it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by markz528 View Post
    Can anyone recommend a good automatic compressor drain for my home shop 5 HP Quincy compressor?

    I don't know anything about them, and could use some guidance.

    I did find this one at MSC, but no idea if it is good choice or not.

    https://www.mscdirect.com/product/details/02178473
    I use Posi-Drain with the same compressor, and I'm very happy about it.
    Last edited by MichaelP; 11-07-2019 at 09:53 AM.

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    we've been using an electric drain valve that I got from Mcmaster for the last 10 years. Replaced it once. Never leaks, and works well.

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    Default Air System Mulitport Auto Drain

    Thought I'd share this method of a reliable compressed air system drain. This may be a bit over the top for a small system, but is perfect for a large system, or a system with lots of scale, condensate and oil from screw compressors.

    Almost all automatic electric drain timers sold today, are provided with a 1/4" NPT drain valve. The actual orifice sizes inside these solenoid valves are about 1/8" or less. Making them susceptible to plugging and hence leaking, with small particles of scale.

    This example was built for an old plant, from WW2 production. It had many system issues, and many auto drain timers installed on the equipment. The plant was having several problems with contaminated air supply to their robots and dust collector cleaning controls. Oil and particles clogging solenoid valves, and water freezing in their dust collector cleaning controls, during the winter.

    Another problem was the plant piping. It had been modified and added to over the years, and there were many sections that trapped water away from the compressed air supply. Some sections were filled with water, like a plumbing trap, and sent liquid slugs of water downstream, when there was demand on the line. No amount of draining at the tank or filters was going to correct this problem.

    A compressor contractor had been to the site and installed numerous automatic drains around the supply system, but the problems persisted.

    The solution was to build a drain manifold system that incorporated a larger solenoid valve, that could pass larger chunks of scale, oil from large screw compressors, and copious amounts of water from several after coolers, refrigerated dryer, line filters, and plumbing traps in the existing lines. Then drain it all to one oil separator, before dumping of the condensate.

    The solenoid valve selected was a 1/2" NPT 120V Dayton model with a 5/8" orifice, and a 120V coil. Tubing and fittings that were used were 3/8" poly in order to easily pass large particles of scale with ease, some filters would only accept 1/4" tube, so that was used in those instances.

    Inline with the solenoid valve, was a 1/2" globe valve, to throttle down the output to a reasonable volume. Two manifold pipes were provided, one for after-coolers and dryers that contained their own internal automatic drains, and one for lines, filters and tanks that needed an automatic drain. The manifold outputs were combined, and then passed onto an oil/ water separator. Oil to a collection container, and water to a local drain. In the photo you can easily see the lines that are pumping oil, with the poly tube.

    The timer that was used was a Posi-Drain from Air System Products, LLC. :: Posi-Drain These models allow easy wiring to a remote solenoid valve and wall mounting. There were several on site already from the prior contractors installation, I just used one of them and claimed the rest for use elsewhere. The units are sold through air compressor distributors, with their individual house brand labels on the front. Many can be found on ebay.com used. The ones with the factory install valve are better than most due to the fact that they have a orifice with a sliding Delrin seal that wipes away contaminates.

    Ebay samples, POSI-DRAIN 110V DRAIN VALVE TIMER CONTROLLED AIR COMPRESSOR PART TITUS | eBay

    ELECTRIC AUTO DRAIN 1/4" NPT 110V TIMER CONTROLLED AIR COMPRESSOR PART ''OEM'' | eBay

    This system was installed ten years ago on a dirty old system, and has required no maintenance other than emptying, the oil collection container. Your needs may be less, but this system could be scaled down to meet a lesser need, and still be reliable, and no fuss.

    autodrainmanifold.jpg

    drainoilseperator.jpg

    SAF Ω

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    My new Kaeser Air Tower has "electronic" drains right at the bottom of the drier. That is where the water comes out. Also one at the bottom of the tank and never any water there.

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    I attached a 90 connection to a drain port. Then extend out about 6" to a Asco valve. This will allow the tank to fully drain into the 6" pipe.
    No more puddles in the bottom of the tank. The Asco valve is activated by 120VAC. The control can be made or purchased.

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    Thanks for all the responses.

    So I see that there are many solutions - I looked at several of the ones mentioned and will figure out which one suites me best. I am leery of the mechanical drains and will probably stick with a solenoid style on a timer.

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    Quote Originally Posted by markz528 View Post
    I am leery of the mechanical drains and will probably stick with a solenoid style on a timer.
    The mechanical drains I have experience with operate open when the water level goes above a minimum level. Then the thing opens and everything blows through.
    What if the minimum level has not been reached but the level is just slightly lower. Then the puddle sits there. Might be a long time.

    If this type of drain is used with a aluminium bowl then the aluminium will corrode. Have seen this on water filters.

    My drain port has a T connection, one for the auto drain path and the other is a ball valve just in case.

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    A story. About 35 years ago, at my father's factory, in an old building, we moved the compressers in the basement and added automatic drains on a timer. Right neat them was a 10 inch cast iron sewer pipe. So I told my guy to drill and tap a fitting into the pipe with a 1/2 inch hose running back to the automatic drains and to set the timer for 10 am. That morning at first break, the drains blow off and pressurized the sewer pipe which caused the toilets in the ladies bathroom to erupt. Not good.

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    Check Amazon.

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    I have bought NOS electric ones from Ingersol Rand on Ebay and they work real well for me for the last 7 - 8 years

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    Quote Originally Posted by mister honey View Post
    I have a Moisture Minder (pneumatic/mechanical) auto drain valve on my 5HP Quincy and it works well for my purposes.

    Mike
    I had never heard of this and after reading this post, I think I'm going to order one. Thanks!


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