"Repair" a damaged mill table with a pallet??? - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    Looking again at the table it looks like one could place table back on machine and cut full length material away where the damage is then make filler slats and bolt them into place then finish in place with same mill to restore the slots.

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I337Z using Tapatalk

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tony Quiring View Post
    Looking again at the table it looks like one could place table back on machine and cut full length material away where the damage is then make filler slats and bolt them into place then finish in place with same mill to restore the slots.

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I337Z using Tapatalk
    Well, fuck yeah!. That's a much better idea than that shit in posts 9 and 14.

  3. #23
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    That's what a few others suggested and the way I'm currently leaning. This suggestion, as all actually, seems well accepted and reasonable.

    BTW I didn't say the mill was well worn or in terrible shape other than the obvious table damage. I said it was 76 years old and, I am assuming, it has a fair amount of wear. Well worn to me means the mill is wobbly, jumpy and pretty much outlived any type of usefulness. I'm fairly sure the mill is serviceable but I don't guarantee this currently. I'm in the process of reassembling it and it's about 1/2 way back together. Once it's together I'll need time to mount a new motor and run it up. Before doing so I'll get the table, knee etc mounted and adjust the gibs and see what presents itself. No point in mounting a new motor and buying belts if the mill does turn out to be scrap. Although it would allow me to sell it if I got it running"Repair" a damaged mill table with a pallet???.
    The mill has power down feed and power X axis. It came apart easier than any other machine I've disassembled which is a bit encouraging. All the bearings seemed OK other than some slight crusty dusty build up. I bought some new and also had some new on hand. I replaced the important ones and got the other few completely cleaned and spinning like new. It only had a single coat of paint which also is a first for me. Judging by the abuse the table took I've been told it may have spent time in a school environment. This is wishful thinking but it's a straw I'll grasp at for the time being.
    Thanks again for the suggestions.

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  4. #24
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    are those holes still threaded? stone the table, bolt on your subplate, and get back to work.

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  6. #25
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    I guess when I read this, well worn was what came to my mind.
    Quote Originally Posted by challenger View Post
    ....This is a 76 year old Index model 40 and it shows its age but it is still fine for my purposes. It's got plenty of backlash and the ways aren't great looking but I can get by with it as is..... This mill would likely be scrap had I not taken it. Needless to say one wouldn't find a machine of this condition in an income producing shop but IMO it is still miles better than the garbage machine I traded for it....
    Usefull to be sure. No matter what you do to the table it will be better, just not sure that using itself to flycut the table will be a benefit since you say and I quote "the ways aren't great looking". You can re evaluate after getting it cleaned up and back together.

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  8. #26
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    Have the original table ground
    Probably plenty of flat surface to bolt on a vice and use as is
    Drill and tap a few holes as need be

    Peter

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  10. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by HuFlungDung View Post
    And for the love of god, don't drill through the subplate into the table!
    I don't think you could hurt that table if you tried..........

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    If you will be using a vise, get a swivel base vise and use the tee nuts in the two outer tee slots, which look to be OK. Clean up the table and you will only see the unsightly damage when the vise is removed.

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  14. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by M.B. Naegle View Post
    I'd think the easiest repair would be to mill off the lips of the slots so you can countersink replacement strips in. Iron would be preferred buy mild steel would work well too. If it became damaged again it would be replaceable. I've seen a few machines that came new from the factory built like this. I think it was so that all the milling could be done with standard cutters; no T-slotting needed.
    I had a lovely little Pallas mill,which had exactly this repair. It had been very well done,all scraped on top after fitting the strips.

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  16. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by gustafson View Post
    I don't think you could hurt that table if you tried..........
    I'm not so sure about this. One time. This was a ball bearing after I hit it with a rubber mallet. "Repair" a damaged mill table with a pallet???

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