Resleeving a motorcycle master cylinder - Page 3
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  1. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by BMyers View Post
    Unlike the blue hairs who stare right at you while they run you down
    Hehe. My grandma got her first drivers license at 65.

    We learned pretty quick not to wave to her when we saw her around town. Wherever her eyes went, that's where the car went.

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  3. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by john.k View Post
    Aint two wheels thats dangerous...its the millenials who think they can watch screens ,and drive at the same time...........deaths caused by drivers on phones should attract 30 years jail ......the millenials might have grown up by the time they get out at 60.

    you got that one right I gave it up too many head up arss drivers

  4. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by wsemajb View Post
    If I'm going to purchase a new cylinder from maxbmw for 200USD, and toss my old one in the trash, I may as well give this a try anyway.

    I apologize to anyone offended, if I came across with any disrespect.

    I'm not a machinist. I'm more like a Burt Munro type, and fully respect that the Burt Munros of this world are destined to irritate a great many professionals from time to time with their seeming indifference to boundaries. I've got a meager shop in the basement. I've worked on small engines and various machinery for a few decades with just the basics of drill press, tig welder, grinders, dremel, etc. It's often been my experience that with sufficient time, patience, imagination, and perfectionism, pretty amazing precision can be had with the right jigs and setup.

    So if you'll humor me for just a moment more I'll suffer more scorn in the hope that someone will toss me a few more clues in the bargain)

    Are the intake and equalization ports on these master cylinders accessible enough from without that they can be mapped/scribed onto a sleeve inserted? This part to me would seem the most difficult to get precise.

    It would seem to me that new seals aren't concerned at all about the precision of the re-bore itself, but only the ID of the sleeve. To this end, a hand held drill would suffice, no? As long as a reasonable slip fit is achieved the sleeve is green loctited or epoxied in place and ports are cleaned up with a little fine polishing. The toughest part ought to be getting the ports mapped precisely enough.

    With real luck, it may even be possible that an appropriately sized sleeve could be found, perhaps linear bearing stock such as this, that would fit without need at all to rebore...(teflon lined may be a bonus, otherwise non lined can be had)

    ISO Metric Precision Sleeve Linear Plain Bearings (PSM)

    Certainly adequate ID precision for this need. And relatively inexpensive.

    Again, I'm sorry for wasting your forums time, attention, bandwidth if such has been the case. Hopefully there is something worthwhile or interesting enough on balance.

    Thank you.
    On the few master cylinders I have sleeved I drilled the ports after the sleeve was in place, dead easy to make sure they are in the right place then. before you get started check the size of the holes. If you don't have size pins you can use the appropriate drill shank to measure.

  5. #44
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    Some cylinders dont have any drilled ports ,they have a rubber/metal valve setup in the end of the cylinder,usually with the return spring incorporated.......these types are difficult to repair,if the rubber valves arent available.They are often very difficult to bleed too,needing pressure reverse bleeding.No amount of pumping will prime the fluid circuit and get them pumping.....Jap clutch cylinders are often like this.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jancollc View Post
    We learned pretty quick not to wave to her when we saw her around town. Wherever her eyes went, that's where the car went.
    She's not the only one. Back when dinosaurs roamed northern california, Dick Mann did a roadrace school for the AFM at Sears Point. One of the things he said was, "Look where you want to be, not at what you're afraid of. You go where you look, so only look where you want to end up."

    Another was, "When you get in trouble, give it more gas." That one is equally true but a little harder to put into practice

  7. #46
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    Target fixation - it's real. I get to practice this every day on the way into work, avoiding the manifold
    potholes on our amazing westchester roadways.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jim rozen View Post
    Target fixation - it's real. I get to practice this every day on the way into work, avoiding the manifold
    potholes on our amazing westchester roadways.

    I target fixated on the guard rail at mile marker 10 on the Cherohala Skyway... It's a long downhill right hand sweeper that suddenly turns into a decreasing radius turn.... Guess who met a guard rail at 60mph?

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    Quote Originally Posted by john.k View Post
    Aint two wheels thats dangerous...its the millenials who think they can watch screens ,and drive at the same time...........deaths caused by drivers on phones should attract 30 years jail ......the millenials might have grown up by the time they get out at 60.
    It's far more than just millennials, my friend. I see plenty of people 40 yrs + driving while on their phones as well. In fact, as of late, I would argue that I've even seen more of them than I have millennials driving while on their phones.

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    Quote Originally Posted by EmanuelGoldstein View Post
    She's not the only one. Back when dinosaurs roamed northern california, Dick Mann did a roadrace school for the AFM at Sears Point. One of the things he said was, "Look where you want to be, not at what you're afraid of. You go where you look, so only look where you want to end up."

    Another was, "When you get in trouble, give it more gas." That one is equally true but a little harder to put into practice

    The one I remember from the driving instructor was, “If in doubt, both feet out”

    Clutch and brake.

    For new learners I guess.

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    Quote Originally Posted by lionelt View Post
    The one I remember from the driving instructor was, “If in doubt, both feet out”

    Clutch and brake.

    For new learners I guess.

    My favorite, attributed to Al Unser, Jr. was "When in doubt, full throttle. It either solves the problem or ends the uncertainty".

  12. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by TeachMePlease View Post
    Guess who met a guard rail at 60mph?
    You shoulda listened to Bugsy

    Quote Originally Posted by lionelt View Post
    The one I remember from the driving instructor was, “If in doubt, both feet out”

    Clutch and brake.

    For new learners I guess.
    Bad teacher ! Bad !

    That's instinct, to freeze like a deer in the headlights, but a better plan is to try to keep controlling the vehicle until either you win or it does.

    Mert said the same thing, so when you get two national # 1's agreeing on tactics, I'm sure not gonna argue.

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    "When in doubt, flat out" is an old dirt rider's maxim.

    Then the commuter's rule which is mr. brake will get you home. Which is to
    say if the traffic conditions get dicey then maybe take it easy.

    Most road riders crash with no control inputs right before the event. They just
    hit the oncoming turning car, or phone pole, or guard rail straight away. Rare
    you see a driver doing he maximum braking thing right before the prang.

    This the MSF class story, learn what the bike can do, most riders are quite rusty.
    Even everyday riders. Take the MSF class, you'll find that your performance at
    stop in the box, maxium braking, swerving, cornering, etc improves between each
    iteration of the exercise. Brakes work better than you know, tires have more
    traction than you think. [1]

    Even seasoned riders get rusty over the winter. This accounts for much of the
    sport rider 'early fails' in the spring.

    [1] actuallly fell over a few times driving in snow/ice conditions. Had a tough time
    picking the bike up because my feet had no traction on the road. But up until the
    moment gravity took over, the bike was driving along just fine.... tires quite sticky
    until they werent.

  14. #53
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    At the risk of getting slapped - if you do a Google search for "1938 pontiac master cylinder sleeve" you will find a thread I made when I recently did a car master cylinder. (Not posted on this forum since it was hobby and not pro)


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