Royal versaturn center? Good general purpose item?
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  1. #1
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    Default Royal versaturn center? Good general purpose item?

    The cheap live center is on a ballistic arc to the dumpster- .0005" runout.

    I am going to get a good Royal or Bison or something like that.

    The Royal versaturn looks like a useful tool, in that it has both the standard center and a tubing capacity. Also a bit less expensive than the standard ones, maybe due to lack of seal?
    The bullnose portion is cut back enough so it looks like it would have minimal interference- but is is not something I need at this time.
    Any comments on this particular center?

    ebay has some new Bison precision centers for around $200...The Royal is twice that +.

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    And just like that, a use for the versa-turn pops up- making an ER collet holder, doing all the boring on the mill, it needs to go back to the lathe for threading- but there is a 25mm hole in the end- sure would be nice to be able to drop a center in there.....
    Anybody use one of them?

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    Cheapo or not, live centers can be reground on their own bearings to run pretty true. Always good to have a cheapo one around for non-critical work and save the big $$$ one for when it really matters.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dan from Oakland View Post
    Cheapo or not, live centers can be reground on their own bearings to run pretty true. Always good to have a cheapo one around for non-critical work and save the big $$$ one for when it really matters.
    How is this done? I'm picturing a tool post grinder on the compound and using the cross slide for infeed. Then just let the center float against the grinding wheel until it sparks outs?

    Naturally this would only correct an improperly ground center, bad bearings may still be a problem.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dan from Oakland View Post
    . . .live centers can be reground on their own bearings. . .
    Quote Originally Posted by Cole2534 View Post
    How is this done?. . .
    I've always had this question too. I don't do any precision grinding so I have little insight.
    As to the VersaTurn profile, for me the bull-nose portion would get in the way. If not directly in way of the cutter, then in the way of the tool holder.

    These are my favorites: Royal Spring-Type Live Centers
    I use them for almost everything, and use a dedicated bull-nose when required.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cole2534 View Post
    How is this done? I'm picturing a tool post grinder on the compound and using the cross slide for infeed. Then just let the center float against the grinding wheel until it sparks outs?

    Naturally this would only correct an improperly ground center, bad bearings may still be a problem.
    Sort of, but you have to spin the live center itself, if you count on traction with the grinding wheel you're either going to overspin the center or grind a divot into a stationary tip.

    Live centers can usually be spun using an O or square ring wrapped around the cylindrical section that's usually behind the tapered tip (or body, if so designed), and powered by a small motor/pulley combo. You can even kluge a portable drill with a chuck mounted pulley to be the motive source, either by clamping the drill in some convenient spot or even just holding it with tension on the belt while grinding.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Milland View Post
    Sort of, but you have to spin the live center itself, if you count on traction with the grinding wheel you're either going to overspin the center or grind a divot into a stationary tip.

    Live centers can usually be spun using an O or square ring wrapped around the cylindrical section that's usually behind the tapered tip (or body, if so designed), and powered by a small motor/pulley combo. You can even kluge a portable drill with a chuck mounted pulley to be the motive source, either by clamping the drill in some convenient spot or even just holding it with tension on the belt while grinding.
    Makes sense. I could probably rig up something like a driveshaft from the lathe chuck to a jack shaft and use that to turn the center.

    Sent from my SM-G973U using Tapatalk

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    Been doing a lot of reading about centers- the people who do it for living say they need to be ground under load-


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