Run die grinder on coolant
Close
Login to Your Account
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 24
  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Minnesota
    Posts
    861
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    432
    Likes (Received)
    439

    Default Run die grinder on coolant

    Hi Guys,

    We thread some stainless pipe in our Mazak QT15 CNC lathe. 1/2" and 3/4" NPT threads in stainless 304 pipe. Cut with laydown inserts. I have found that running a wire wheel over the threads takes care of any micro burrs, makes the parts safer to handle, and the thread gauge to thread on nicely.

    We currently run a 2" wire wheel on a handheld cordless right angle grinder after the program is done and before we unload the part. I'd like to do the wire wheeling automatically. It isn't a live tooled machine. And it is a turret type. So the only "power" I have is the low pressure coolant that runs through the turret and to the tool holder.

    Is there any possibility of the low pressure coolant being capable of running a small off the shelf die grinder? If it wasn't 5:15 on a Friday afternoon, I'd be trying it right now.

    Thanks,

    -Jim

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Minnesota
    Posts
    861
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    432
    Likes (Received)
    439

    Default

    And with the off-the-shelf die grinder on coolant being probably a stupid idea ... does anyone have a clever idea?

    My next stupid clever ideas is a cordless die grinder in the lathe and triggered by coolant expanding a bladder against the trigger.

    What I would really like is a donut shaped wire brush with a mandrel. Something like
    McMaster-Carr
    but with a mandrel and available in size for 1/2" and 3/4" NPT thread.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Oz
    Posts
    381
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    16
    Likes (Received)
    78

    Default

    No chance to run an air die grinder. A water wheel / peleton / rubber vane might give you enough grunt for rotation of a wheel against a spinning part. The coolant pump would need to be a positive displacement type rather than a centrifugal.

    Got any high pressure oil available to run a hydraulic motor?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    New York
    Posts
    2,140
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1717
    Likes (Received)
    1051

    Default

    hmm... running a die grinder on coolant..? asking at 5:15 on a Friday... have you had a few already?

    or maybe you are trollin' us, and I took the bait... so wait, why can't you just run an air die grinder on air?

  5. Likes in2glamisgirl liked this post
  6. #5
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Minnesota
    Posts
    861
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    432
    Likes (Received)
    439

    Default

    Not a drinker...just a long week and was confusing air tools working underwater and air tools working with water in my mind.

    I want to mount the tool to the CNC lathe turret and have the CNC operate it. I don't have live tools or air or anything other than coolant to the turret.

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    650
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    216

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by kb0thn View Post
    Not a drinker...just a long week and was confusing air tools working underwater and air tools working with water in my mind.

    I want to mount the tool to the CNC lathe turret and have the CNC operate it. I don't have live tools or air or anything other than coolant to the turret.
    No air? That's the usual option. Or electricity. It takes significant power to run a die grinder.

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    21,607
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by kb0thn View Post
    Hi Guys,

    We thread some stainless pipe in our Mazak QT15 CNC lathe. 1/2" and 3/4" NPT threads in stainless 304 pipe. Cut with laydown inserts. I have found that running a wire wheel over the threads takes care of any micro burrs, makes the parts safer to handle, and the thread gauge to thread on nicely.

    We currently run a 2" wire wheel on a handheld cordless right angle grinder after the program is done and before we unload the part. I'd like to do the wire wheeling automatically. It isn't a live tooled machine. And it is a turret type. So the only "power" I have is the low pressure coolant that runs through the turret and to the tool holder.

    Is there any possibility of the low pressure coolant being capable of running a small off the shelf die grinder? If it wasn't 5:15 on a Friday afternoon, I'd be trying it right now.

    Thanks,

    -Jim
    Easy to find out...even on a Sunday...:d
    Pneumatic 1/4 in. Air Die Grinder

    Looks like $12 to find out.

  9. Likes DavidScott liked this post
  10. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Wilmington DE USA
    Posts
    2,305
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    377
    Likes (Received)
    504

    Default

    Id try mounting a 4-6" wire wheel on a shaft fitted in one of your boring bar pockets with a nylok to give friction resistance so it just barely turns.
    I'm sure there is a sweet spot with pressure, feed & repeats that wipes the micro burrs

  11. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Country
    AUSTRALIA
    Posts
    4,400
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    22
    Likes (Received)
    1611

    Default

    Dont dental powerheads run on high pressure water?

  12. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Indiana
    Posts
    5,998
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2055
    Likes (Received)
    2044

    Default

    Use an electric die grinder. Use the coolant pressure to trigger an appropriate pressure switch, use that to activate a relay to run the die grinder. You can probably use an m-code, is it? to enable/disable the relay so the grinder doesn't run every time the coolant is turned on, but only when it's needed.

  13. Likes hanermo liked this post
  14. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Vershire, Vermont
    Posts
    2,708
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1899
    Likes (Received)
    904

    Default

    Not a bad idea, cheap to try and all that.

    What about mounting the McCarr style donut brush on the turret and rotating the pipe threads inside it?

    Coolant could keep the brush clear.

  15. Likes atex57, Peter from Holland liked this post
  16. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Bellingham, WA
    Posts
    4,443
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1101
    Likes (Received)
    2518

    Default

    Another possible thing to try: mount a freely turning (on suitable bearing) wire wheel so it can intersect the spinning part at maybe (to be determined) 30 deg angle. Spinning part powers the wheel. Might require two wheels. One angled to the left and one to the right.

    Denis

  17. Likes tim9lives liked this post
  18. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    California, Central Coast
    Posts
    5,231
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2384
    Likes (Received)
    2158

    Default

    Hydraulic grinders are also used underwater. That should run just fine on coolant, low coolant pressure might mean reduced power....YMMV

  19. #14
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Nebraska
    Posts
    408
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    42
    Likes (Received)
    241

    Default

    Have you considered full profile inserts? Deburr the leading thread with your turning tool and the burrs shouldn't be terrible.

  20. #15
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    United States, CT
    Posts
    133
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    66
    Likes (Received)
    26

    Default

    I have seen pneumatic grinders mounted to the turret, with a quick connect fitting mounted such that is plugs into air when the turret indexes to that tool.
    Seems like a lot of work, I would pursue a static method like others are suggesting.
    How many parts? That dictates how long to spend improving the process.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  21. Likes kb0thn liked this post
  22. #16
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Washington
    Posts
    3,410
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1389
    Likes (Received)
    1511

    Default

    If your coolant is clean enough, not a chance unless you filter it, and you have enough pressure it would probably work. Keep in mind the die grinders I am familiar with use the air and oil to lubricate the bearings as well as the vanes.

    Here is a block I made to take the guts of my die grinder so I have a "live" tool for my little manual lathe to drill holes. On second thought could you rig a solenoid valve and use air to drive your air grinder? Do you have 2 spare M codes?

    widgets.jpg

  23. Likes Garwood, kb0thn, BGL liked this post
  24. #17
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Oregon
    Posts
    6,008
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    6486
    Likes (Received)
    3351

    Default

    I had a machine that controlled a 3 way solenoid valve with an M-code to put air in the coolant stream for milling steel. That would be easy to rig up to drive an air tool.

  25. #18
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Oklahoma City, OK
    Posts
    5,485
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1059
    Likes (Received)
    2392

    Default

    Air motors typically get their RPM from the gas expansion and that won't be happening with a liquid.

    Sent via CNC 88HS

  26. Likes tdmidget liked this post
  27. #19
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Minnesota
    Posts
    861
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    432
    Likes (Received)
    439

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mjk View Post
    Id try mounting a 4-6" wire wheel on a shaft fitted in one of your boring bar pockets with a nylok to give friction resistance so it just barely turns.
    I'm sure there is a sweet spot with pressure, feed & repeats that wipes the micro burrs
    Awesome! I was having similar thoughts. I'm going to try this.


    Quote Originally Posted by bigjon61 View Post
    Have you considered full profile inserts? Deburr the leading thread with your turning tool and the burrs shouldn't be terrible.
    Yes, I am running full profile inserts. SECO 16ER14NPT CP500. It's kind of a problem part. With this SECO insert the tool life is really variable. Sometimes I get one part and sometimes I get 30 parts per corner. At $8 per corner it is really annoying. I have tried CARMEX and got consistently poor (terrible) results. Will hopefully be trying Vargus in near future.

    The burrs aren't terrible. There is usually a little string burr, about 1/4 long and a few tho diameter, at the start of the thread. I chamfer before threading. That string burr gets pulled under the ring gauge and stops the gauge from going on. Besides that burr, running the wire wheel over the threads seems to make them mate smoother and have less sharp stuff for handling. The particular part gets handled by the end user. My threads look much nicer than the typical torn nasty threads on most pipe and that makes the assembly nicer for the customer.

    Quote Originally Posted by kineticmx View Post
    I have seen pneumatic grinders mounted to the turret, with a quick connect fitting mounted such that is plugs into air when the turret indexes to that tool.
    Seems like a lot of work, I would pursue a static method like others are suggesting.
    How many parts? That dictates how long to spend improving the process.
    It's a few hundred parts per year. Forever. Goes in a product we make. I typically run about 50 pipes (100 ends) at a go. Getting the part deburred in machine would greatly reduce the cycle time. We gauge the part while it is still in the chuck so we can replace an insert (see above) without scrapping the part. So I would double the throughput on the part and probably save 12 hours per year in front of the machine. We've been making the part for 11 years now. Did the first 7 years on a Rigid pipe threader with sharp threads and the guy running the machine complaining how difficult the work was to make consistent threads. Moved it to the lathe and have beautiful threads but am fighting randomly exploding inserts. Looking at a $$$ threading machine (Oyster), but they are a lot of $$$$$ and the factory samples have tearing and aren't as nice as what we want.

    Thanks all!
    Last edited by kb0thn; 05-17-2021 at 10:32 AM. Reason: covered in previous post

  28. #20
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    North Carolina
    Posts
    2,170
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    243
    Likes (Received)
    511

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Cole2534 View Post
    Air motors typically get their RPM from the gas expansion and that won't be happening with a liquid.

    Sent via CNC 88HS
    Internal combustion motors typically get their RPM from gas expansion.

    -Doozer


Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •