rust protecton for new machines
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  1. #1
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    Default rust protecton for new machines

    Looking for recommendations for light oil to protect machine surfaces on my lathe, manual mill, etc....one recommendation was Lube-All. What do you recommend?

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    Starrett M1. Not cheap but works great, doesn't stain, and easy to remove.

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    Way oil. ISO32 or 68 for horizontal surfaces, ISO220 for vertical ones. Works on the ways, also works on everything else.

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    A good dehumidifier, and either an drain line to the outside, or connect to your plumbing (with a trap). Having to empty the bucket is annoying...

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    Not that I've ever bothered with a machine, but used lanolin for bits and pieces that will sit for a while post machining to prevent rust, it's cheapish....if not sheepish!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mud View Post
    Starrett M1. Not cheap but works great, doesn't stain, and easy to remove.
    +1 for M1. I use KOOL MIST water based coolant. After jobs I wipe dry all surfaces, then a light mist and wipe with M1. No rust in years.

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    LPS-1 is an alternative to Starret M1.

    LPS-3 leaves a sturdy waxy coating. Not hard to clean off (like cosmoline) and easier to apply than anhydrous lanolin.

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    I found that a "Fluid Film" work well. It is lanolin based.

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    Constant use is best!
    Got a shop full of iron not far from your location and to be true, never bother with "protective" coatings and don't have rust issues.....even in the winter...Just wipe things down when finished, being careful to not remove
    oil from sensitive surfaces.
    Its a climate thing.....Relatively low humidity and warm temps here.

    LPS3 is best for long term storage, so when shipping parts to places where the climate is less favorable or outside storage...

    Cheers Ross

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    Being from Benica I was expecting something from you like wipe down with camel fur soaked in oil.
    Bill D

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    Quote Originally Posted by tech610 View Post
    I found that a "Fluid Film" work well. It is lanolin based.
    I looked the MSDS up. It's basically lanolin in kerosene, or maybe something slightly lighter. Lanolin is the traditional rust inhibitor used in marine applications of multi-stranded galvanized wire rope. Look in books on marine rigging for recipes.

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    "
    rust protecton for new machines "

    was wondering if new machines get different/better protection than our old turds ?

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    CRC 3-36 for me.

    Sent from my SM-G973U using Tapatalk

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    Quote Originally Posted by drcoelho View Post
    Looking for recommendations for light oil to protect machine surfaces
    CRC 3-36 is great stuff and is surprisingly good at preventing rust. I was skeptical but after it dries it leaves an extremely thin protective layer that even works on vise anvils in active northern garages. It usually has a dye in it (different colors avail), so you can verify coverage. It is very thin, and so it sprays and wicks extremely well. Gallons are cheap. It is very toxic to aquatic life, so it isn't exactly benign.

    Quote Originally Posted by tech610 View Post
    I found that a "Fluid Film" work well. It is lanolin based.
    If you like to smell like ground up rotting sheep, otherwise I would say it is a big no for actively used machines. It has some great features for machines in storage. Especially on cold machines, in cold application conditions. It does stay wet and goopy, so it is fairly "self healing" on a machine, meaning a scratch or void in coverage (like from a cover) will tend to fill in over time. It also does not require much in the way of surface prep. It is cheap by the gallon and I slather it in with a big paint brush. I see people often suggest it is non-toxic or natural in some way but even applied with a paint brush in the cold, it chokes up my lungs and throat pretty good, so I think those claims are BS.

    LPS 3 is great, but it is not suitable for machines in active use and the application requirements for good long term protection are somewhat involved and particular.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Glug View Post
    If you like to smell like ground up rotting sheep, otherwise I would say it is a big no for actively used machines. It has some great features for machines in storage. Especially on cold machines, in cold application conditions. It does stay wet and goopy, so it is fairly "self healing" on a machine, meaning a scratch or void in coverage (like from a cover) will tend to fill in over time. It also does not require much in the way of surface prep. It is cheap by the gallon and I slather it in with a big paint brush. I see people often suggest it is non-toxic or natural in some way but even applied with a paint brush in the cold, it chokes up my lungs and throat pretty good, so I think those claims are BS.
    Yep that's the stuff. I bought an aerosol can to try it. Used it twice now it's on a shelf by itself and I'm hoping all the gas leaks out before I'm tempted to use it again.
    My shop manager uses it to winterize his vehicles, buys gallons and sprays it on the underside of his trucks, it seems to do that well.

    Gibbs is pretty good too. Hot rod guys use it to seal up magnesium wheels after being polished.

    M1 is largely petrolatum in solvent with a few additives. I tried to figure out what it is in order to duplicate it on the cheap because we buy it in pails and sometimes dip finished parts in it but haven't been able to. The effect is like a micron thick layer of Vaseline. We make parts with pointy teeth and other features that make them real hard to clean, so we tested all sorts of preservatives to avoid staining and laborious cleaning after storage and we've settled on M1. Tried a few others since, hated the vapors, went back to M1. I've seen a few interesting products here on PM in the last year or so but haven't been motivated to change what works again yet.


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