Scissor lift bearing identification
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  1. #1
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    Default Scissor lift bearing identification

    I'm looking for the bearing in the images below - it's the pivot bearing on a scissor lift and I'm looking for the name of the bearing so I can find a source for several (I need at least 8 for a lift I'm planning on making).

    20210909_104311_compress38.jpg

    20210909_104318_compress40.jpg

    20210909_104315_compress0.jpg

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    Probably a steel on steel spherical bushing.....Can be expensive in the bigger sizes Ive used for articulated loaders and cranes.

  3. #3
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    Maybe a cam follower bearing

  4. #4
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    Maybe this link can help (from a search for "scissor lift pivot bearings"):

    Lift Bushings & Bearings - Hardware - Partsroom

    ["X" click through the "We're Closed" banner to see the page]

    Seems like a lot of metal and polymer bushings, not rolling element bearings. Obviously designing the pivots to prevent axial separation is critical...

    Also: https://www.igus.com/info/industries...ngmechanism-ca

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    Looks about same material as excavator pins/bushings.

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    Appears to be weld bead both sides - which suggests welded in flanged pin one side and welded in bush other side - not coming apart until weld beads are gone

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    John has it right. Plane bearings are the way to go with no provision to separate. You definatly do not want a spherical bearing on any sissor linkage especially if you are riding on top of it. That set up is as simple, strong and fool proof as possible.

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    Probably nothing special. Most of the stronger alloys don't lend themselves to welding like that, and as long as you make it big enough for the load and keep it greased, even 1018 should be fine.

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    I don't think scissor lifts built in this century have used greasable bearings. They use IGUS or Garlock polymer metal composite bushings that don't need grease.

    My scissor lift is a 2008 JLG and there's no grease zerks on it. It works great.


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