Scotch Brite Flap wheel cutting
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  1. #1
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    Default Scotch Brite Flap wheel cutting

    I would need to cut few Scoth Brite Flap Wheels to different size and bevel the front edge.

    Any suggestions how to approach this?

    I am thinking to sharpen a HSS blank really sharp and try to turn it in a lathe.

    Thanks!

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    I've shaped them by running the flap wheel backwards while using an angle grinder to do the shaping.

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    40 grit band on a belt sander/grinder to rough it out . use some kind of drill spindle or arbor to rotate the wheel .

    i'ne had good results with this one:

    200mm Dia Nylon Abrasive Grinding Polishing Buffing Wheel Red DT 190268262224 | eBay

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    Bench grinder.

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    Its going for a specific machine and the bevel in the front edge needs to be 35 degrees from the centerline

    Diameter need to be cut from 100mm to 87mm

    Theres no way to make it in a lathe with sharp HSS ?

    I think that grinding it down would get best results in finish.
    Some kind of jig is needed to be made.

    I have a Fein Grit GI 1502H belt sander, theres on top a straight place for grinding.

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    If you are intent on cutting them in the lathe and you don't need a concave profile, I would try using utility knife blades. They are inexpensive and disposable.

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    To clarify abit i linked below what they look like


    scotch brite flap wheel - Google Search

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    1. Possible they would grind with using an Aluminum Oxide wheel, rotating both. TC or surface grinder

    2. Putting the scotch bright arbor on a bushing (perhaps just a drilled slug) to hand hold against a running bench grinder wheel. Tilting the scotch bright wheel at angle so it would not run over about 500 RPM (or there abouts)

    (X) I don't think you will have much luck with HSS or carbide tool bits and running on a lathe.

    Just friction spinning against a carbide slug may cause the angle but this likely to be time consuming IMHO.

    Hand hold slug chuck..about 25mm roung x 4" long .. drill a hole to fit SB arbor.. put in a few drops oil and hold against the bench grinder wheel with light pressure, just enough to get a spin.

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    Honestly, i have shaped em with just simple old broken bits of brick and such, bits of broken grind wheel work well, Not sure your going to be able to turn em with out tearing them, how ever sharp you make the HSS it won't be 2 secounds later!

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    Quote Originally Posted by michiganbuck View Post
    1. Possible they would grind with using an Aluminum Oxide wheel, rotating both. TC or surface grinder

    2. Putting the scotch bright arbor on a bushing (perhaps just a drilled slug) to hand hold against a running bench grinder wheel. Tilting the scotch bright wheel at angle so it would not run over about 500 RPM (or there abouts)

    (X) I don't think you will have much luck with HSS or carbide tool bits and running on a lathe.

    Just friction spinning against a carbide slug may cause the angle but this likely to be time consuming IMHO.

    Hand hold slug chuck..about 25mm roung x 4" long .. drill a hole to fit SB arbor.. put in a few drops oil and hold against the bench grinder wheel with light pressure, just enough to get a spin.

    Why not over 500rpm?

    Would it be most effective to run them different directions? (scotch bright and grinder wheel)

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    Because the arbor may begin to come out of the holding device, centrifugal force may sway/tilt the holding, it may begin to whip.
    Different direction not much aid as a running wheel to SB should be enough.

    Yes high speed with adama's good suggestion when running against a brick or a parked grinding wheel

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    Quote Originally Posted by adama View Post
    Honestly, i have shaped em with just simple old broken bits of brick and such, bits of broken grind wheel work well, Not sure your going to be able to turn em with out tearing them, how ever sharp you make the HSS it won't be 2 secounds later!
    Carbide might hold cutting edge enough long, depending how many of wheels you need to cut.

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    ^ Why worn out grinding wheels are free and alu oxide abrasive the stuff in scotch brite tends to blunt carbide pretty fast. Coarser alu oxide just rips it off in a nice smooth manner, you need to try it.

    Its not like you need to dress them to perfection either, they soon take the shape off the work once you get em near.

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    I'm not a machinist. Just a thought. What if placed in water, frozen then ground to a shape wanted.

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    Use one of these, it's what they're made for.

    Sent from my SM-N960U using Tapatalk

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    Quote Originally Posted by cb750chris View Post
    Use one of these, it's what they're made for.

    Sent from my SM-N960U using Tapatalk
    Yea right...NOT.
    Carbide will not trim theses wheel without lots of effort. Sticks are useless.
    We use the non-flap style to round or hone carbide in production of 100's or 1000's and more.
    Yes it will eat into it given time. We comp that.
    Assume you do not have cncs to do it but a bench grinder or even a hand cutout grinder can make you forms.
    You want a straight angle, you do realize these are flexible guys right?
    A straight angle dress or truing is easy on a bench or surface grinder. It will not stay true but usually does not need to.
    Complex forms are messy but they are ground into the fiber/flap with rough standard grind wheels or profiled in in what are like cutoff wheels.

    These things do not make parts to size.
    They edge dress, de-burr and polish. Are you sure you are into the correct abrasive type for your job?
    If you need to grind a controlled angle onto a part this is not where you want to be looking.
    Bob

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    Quote Originally Posted by CarbideBob View Post
    Yea right...NOT.
    Bob
    How do you figure? Been using them for 30 years for dressing wheels or scotchbrite pads of all shapes and sizes. Besides, the OP is talking about dressing a scotchbrite buff, never going to hold an exact angle to begin with.

    Sent from my SM-N960U using Tapatalk

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    I dont know the final application, but its going to be used for "Cleaning something"

    My only cnc machine is my deckel fp4a. Been also thinking about using a collet to hold these and run them against fixed handheld beltsander..

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    I dress cloth flapwheels frequently on a bench grinder with a coarse wheel. I don't think scotch brite would be so different. Have them counter-rotating, and run the wheel fast to make it seem 'harder' for shaping. Usually I'd run the flap wheel in my die grinder. Grinds quick and easy and makes lots of dust.

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    Quote Originally Posted by CarbideBob View Post
    Yea right...NOT.
    Carbide will not trim theses wheel without lots of effort. Sticks are useless.
    We use the non-flap style to round or hone carbide in production of 100's or 1000's and more.
    Yes it will eat into it given time. We comp that.
    Assume you do not have cncs to do it but a bench grinder or even a hand cutout grinder can make you forms.
    You want a straight angle, you do realize these are flexible guys right?
    A straight angle dress or truing is easy on a bench or surface grinder. It will not stay true but usually does not need to.
    Complex forms are messy but they are ground into the fiber/flap with rough standard grind wheels or profiled in in what are like cutoff wheels.

    These things do not make parts to size.
    They edge dress, de-burr and polish. Are you sure you are into the correct abrasive type for your job?
    If you need to grind a controlled angle onto a part this is not where you want to be looking.
    Bob
    I think you missed what the OP is trying to dress, and you're making it way overcomplicated. It's a red scotchbrite flap/buff used in a handheld diegrinder or foredom. Chuck it up in your rotary tool of choice, hold in one hand, hold the dressing stick in the other at the desired angle, dress to desired shape/angle. 30 seconds. Done.

    Sent from my SM-N960U using Tapatalk


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