Selection of new boring bars.....which one??
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  1. #1
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    Default Selection of new boring bars.....which one??

    Backround......

    I am not a production machine shop, I do not solicit machine shop work.

    That being said, we do "machine shop work" all the time for the products we build ..

    I need to update our boring bar tooling for both the lathes and boring heads.

    I know this could turn out to be a Ford/Chevy thing.........I hope not....

    1/2, 3/4, 1" dia bars, indexable, what type of insert??? triangle/diamond??

    Not wanting cheap China stuff here, looking for high quality., will be used with carbon ,SS and a bit of aluminum.

    Most boring we do is 3" or less in depth of material.

    Thks

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    Regardless of the insert, I would go with solid carbide/heavy metal bars if you can afford them, The ease in avoiding chatter is night and day compared to steel bars.

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    For those sizes of bars, I'd for sure get solid carbide if you're going to run bores of any real depth. Steel bars turn into chatter city after just a few xD. It is typically advisable to run as big of bar as you can get away with to limit chatter and deflection, but those carbide bars in bigger diameters get spendy quick.

    I'm a fan of Ingersoll's boring bars. I have a few of them in my Mazak running production and they've been great. I'm running primarily aluminum, nylon and delrin, so I can't speak to their durability in steels, bit what little I've done in steel with them they've worked fine. I just ordered a brand new solid carbide 5/8" bar yesterday for delivery monday, so we'll see what it is like in comparison to the steel bars. These tools are using a CCGT insert and leaves amazing finishes on the parts we make with it. Not that it is that hard to make plastic look good. Chip management on the other hand...

    This is the bar I just ordered. EDP: 3604260 - Part Number: E10R-SCLCR-3 - Series: E-SCLCR/L (Carbide)

    For a budget bar, I've had good luck with 1-1/4" Hertel bars with an Iscar Sumotec WNMG 432 insert on my manual lathes. I've HOGGED stainless with those bars, excellent finish and insert life. I ran flood coolant through the bar and took like, .200 depth of cut and it just happily flung chips in 304 SS.

    Lots of this will depend heavily on your parts. Material, geometry and size, as well as machine horsepower and rigidity. You don't say if you're running CNCs or manual equipment, but manual lathes tend to be more hard on inserts and can have rigidity issues on smaller machines trying to run too big of a bar.

    Unfortunately, you probably will need two sets of bars, one with an insert geometry that plays nice with steels and harder materials, and an other set with sharp positive rake inserts for aluminum and plastic.

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    Boring bars would be used in a 17" lathe, #4 Vertical mill and a 4x13 radial most often...course all manual but good tight machines. Current boring head takes 3/4.

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    Quote Originally Posted by MwTech Inc View Post
    1/2, 3/4, 1" dia bars, indexable, what type of insert??? triangle/diamond??
    Most boring we do is 3" or less in depth of material.
    1/2" and larger bar? 3" and less depth? Mostly cutting chilled BUTTER?

    Pilgrim? You ain't the one with a "problem".

    Most anything that suits yer existing choice of already-proven value-for-money inserts should do yah well enough.

    The guys with a multiple of that depth and in challenging alloys need the exotic self-dampeners and such. Nice goods to have, but you don't really need that.

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    Mitsubishi dimple bars are my choice. Made from heavy metal.

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    I don’t think you can beat Maritool for carbide bars from 5/16 up to 1”. YG1 inserts to go with. Smaller though go to Everede.

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    There is a place down the road from me called Ultra-Dex that has been making boring bars for quite a long while.
    Entering the boring bar market was sort of the big jump for the company which started as a couple people in a old gas station doing mostly tool holder repair work and some specials.
    Now they are part of Arch.

    Steel. heavy metal, carbide the price rises and what damping do you need?
    I know of none that offer a true full carbide boring bar outside on insane price specials that only megabucks places use.
    The normal heads are brazed on steel sections but one gets the carbide rod or shank.
    Heavy metal are one part construction but the work on the end costs more.

    Inserts used can make such a world of difference here as they sort of control the cutting forces and frequencies of that pulling metal off.
    Never had a boring bar I did not like but some have not liked what I wanted to do.

    The carbide ones great until you rip the head off and have to ante up to a new one or have the head replaced.
    Steel ones and wrecked but low enough price to be tossed and buy a new one.
    For sure with unlimited funds carbide bar as they behave so much nicer or are more tolerant to insert geometries.

    Take this as the net talk. I do not have one single carbide shank boring bar in my shop in the tool racks.

    Triangle, diamond's of shapes. Why do they act so different and how to get some basic grasp of WTF is going on.
    This so often makes no sense but one gets happy with a combo that works.
    Bob

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    I have sandvick Coromat bars up to 12”, I can’t find fault in them, we had some ingersoll kit in work, equally good, trouble is named stuff is a bit pricy
    Big bars are best home made I think, big bit of round bar, we made a really long one in work out of heavy wall hydraulic tube filled with lead shot ( I still think it was too heavy!) good side it didn’t chatter!
    Mark

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    I have a half dozen SCLP Kennametal bars right and left hand from 3/8 to 1”. They use 80* diamond inserts. I really like them. Inserts are CPMT and come in lots of grades and not stupid expensive.


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