Semi-OT- What to do when a Tap-con strips?
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  1. #1
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    Default Semi-OT- What to do when a Tap-con strips?

    Was hanging a small shelf in some brick using tapcon concrete anchors (the little blue ones) and of all the 9 holes, one happened to fall on a mortar joint. Naturally, it pulled the mortar out as soon as I put any torque on it.

    I really want to use the tapcon screw I already have, the aesthetics need to match.


    What options do I have here?

    Thanks, Cole

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    Hmmm. I used Tapcon screws in mortar joints many times without any problems. Different type of mortar, maybe?
    Last edited by MichaelP; 03-09-2020 at 10:16 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cole2534 View Post
    Was hanging a small shelf in some brick using tapcon concrete anchors (the little blue ones) and of all the 9 holes, one happened to fall on a mortar joint. Naturally, it pulled the mortar out as soon as I put any torque on it.

    I really want to use the tapcon screw I already have, the aesthetics need to match.


    What options do I have here?

    Thanks, Cole
    Drill the hole out larger and put in a soft lead alloy anchor that the Tapcon will bite into OR fill the hole with concrete anchoring epoxy.

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    Drill a big hole in the mortor, fill with better mortar, let set, re-drill, install tapcon.

    CarlBoyd

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    Quote Originally Posted by APD View Post
    Drill the hole out larger and put in a soft lead alloy anchor that the Tapcon will bite into OR fill the hole with concrete anchoring epoxy.
    Leaning toward the latter of these 2.

    Here's the shelf-

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    nice shelf! ok, if a tapcon strips out, back it out, jam a chopstick in there, drive in a new one. done.

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    "What to do when a Tap-con strips?"

    Stuff a fiver in her G-string and hope your wife doesn't catch you there. A ten spot in some localities.



    Sorry, I just couldn't resist.

    "Clumsy bastard" is another good response here.



    I simply can't help myself. It's just so easy.

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    I've had that happen in mortar. I've always used epoxy, but that screw (with epoxy) will likely be 'ornamental' only. Doesn't look like that would matter at all in your case.

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    Back when I did concrete for a living we had to attach wood forms to CMU block or concrete walls. A trick an old timer taught me was to get the form in position, drill through form and into wall, then insert a piece of weed eater string and drive home your 16D duplex nail. Suckers held every time.

    Never tried it with a screw, but would sure give it a shot!

    Murf

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    Best would be new mortar, first I would use a small plastic insert if the remaining mortar holds up.
    These type:
    Plastic - Masonry & Concrete Anchors - Anchors - The Home Depot

    I use the 3/8 size to mount handrails to walls with, really strong.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cole2534 View Post
    Was hanging a small shelf in some brick using tapcon concrete anchors (the little blue ones) and of all the 9 holes, one happened to fall on a mortar joint. Naturally, it pulled the mortar out as soon as I put any torque on it.

    I really want to use the tapcon screw I already have, the aesthetics need to match.


    What options do I have here?

    Thanks, Cole
    Demo the brick and start-over with reinforced concrete and brick veneer. Embed ties for shelving attach before you pour the 'crete?

    Tapcons SUCK!

    RedHeads RULE.

    But yah can't reliably attach anything heavier than a bad odour or a nasty stain to common brick.

    Nature of the material.

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    FFS, I’m not kidding about the chopstick!

    No need to remove the bracket, no need to wait for anything to set up, it just works.

    Just try it.

    There are generally two types of wood used for chopsticks, the bamboo and the softer wood. for a hole in mortar, I’d use the softer wood.

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    Quote Originally Posted by cyanidekid View Post
    FFS, I’m not kidding about the chopstick!

    No need to remove the bracket, no need to wait for anything to set up, it just works.

    Just try it.

    There are generally two types of wood used for chopsticks, the bamboo and the softer wood. for a hole in mortar, I’d use the softer wood.
    *yawn* chopsticks, toothpicks, sliver of most any wood as fits, stranded electrical wire, jacket OFF of electrical wire, weed-wacker nylon or aramid.. yah. LOTS of "stuffing stuff" can work with the ANCHOR.

    But common fired clay brick is a right b***h for holding any sort of expansion anchor reliably, regardless.

    Been done to death, that situation. EVEN "Right here, on PM", already.

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    Quote Originally Posted by thermite View Post
    *yawn* chopsticks, toothpicks, sliver of most any wood as fits, stranded electrical wire, jacket OFF of electrical wire, weed-wacker nylon or aramid.. yah. LOTS of "stuffing stuff" can work with the ANCHOR.

    But common fired clay brick is a right b***h for holding any sort of expansion anchor reliably, regardless.

    Been done to death, that situation. EVEN "Right here, on PM", already.
    Well, yea. Obviously.

    It’s just a piece of wood. No magic in a chopstick, that’s not what I was sayin.just a handy splinter. In fact, I used a piece of solid 12ga copper the last time I needed to get a tapcon to bite, and it was in a hearth so I didn’t want to use wood.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Murf View Post
    Back when I did concrete for a living we had to attach wood forms to CMU block or concrete walls. A trick an old timer taught me was to get the form in position, drill through form and into wall, then insert a piece of weed eater string and drive home your 16D duplex nail. Suckers held every time.

    Never tried it with a screw, but would sure give it a shot!

    Murf
    Yup, my concrete friends showed me that, but used rebar tying wire.

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    Quote Originally Posted by cyanidekid View Post
    FFS, I’m not kidding about the chopstick!

    No need to remove the bracket, no need to wait for anything to set up, it just works.

    Just try it.

    There are generally two types of wood used for chopsticks, the bamboo and the softer wood. for a hole in mortar, I’d use the softer wood.
    I think I will! It will be a bit before I can return to the site, but I'll report back.

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    I've never used a chopstick, but normally the biggest zip-tie that will fit in the hole.

    It just forces the tapcon to bite into the other side of the hole.

    I've never had one pull out afterwards either.

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    simply drill "All-the-Way-Thru" the wall, threaded rod, to plate on other side.

    Easy Peasy....

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    If that shelf is anything but decorative, it is going to fail, as thermite said, getting a screw to hold reliably in pressed brick, or mortar, is a fools errand.

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    Quote Originally Posted by dalmatiangirl61 View Post
    If that shelf is anything but decorative, it is going to fail, as thermite said, getting a screw to hold reliably in pressed brick, or mortar, is a fools errand.
    It is decorative.

    I don't totally understand your comments about it failing, could you elaborate? There's a whole subsection of the fastener industry centered around attaching things to brick/mortar/concrete so a blanket 'this will never work' is met with some suspicion.


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