Shizuoka Manual Horizontal Mill... Bad idea?
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    Default Shizuoka Manual Horizontal Mill... Bad idea?

    Can’t afford Milacron’s Deckel mills, which I really want.
    Is this Shizuoka good, bad?

    I would like something a little stronger than my BP’s. Something I could use larger end mills and face mills with.

    I can’t find much about these, but it includes the vertical head and some tooling. Plus it looks very original. I was thinking of offering $6,000 to $8,000??

    Shizuoka Model SP-CH, 11" x 52" Horizontal Milling Machine, Vertical Head, DRO | eBay

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    I don't know anything about that machine but it looks good in the pictures. It probably doesn't matter with the DRO but do you know if it is metric or inch.

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    Although I have never operated one, this seems like a nice machine, built to an industrial standard. Power-Z is a great feature, as is the good assortment of tooling. Did I miss a view showing the overarm with the paired arbor supports?

    -Marty-

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marty Feldman View Post
    Although I have never operated one, this seems like a nice machine, built to an industrial standard. Power-Z is a great feature, as is the good assortment of tooling. Did I miss a view showing the overarm with the paired arbor supports?

    -Marty-
    The paired arbor supports are on the lower shelf of the tool cart.

    CarlBoyd

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    Quote Originally Posted by TheOldCar View Post
    I was thinking of offering $6,000 to $8,000??
    All he can do is say "no". Looks of the mill, 100% positive feedback? He will.

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    I ran a Shizuoka CNC mill that was very high quality. Did not shy away from heavy cuts or heavy drilling. I see no reason why this machine would not be any less in quality. Looks complete with the vertical head also. Whether it's inch or metric should be of no consequence.

    Paul

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    A machine like this can come in very handy when you need it. The vertical head alone is worth many times what the rest of the machine is. Sellers asking price is quite delusional.

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    Don't neglect the investment in 50 (maybe 40 in v. head) taper tooling - you do want to hold some cutting tools in the spindle

    And the expensive ride out to Ut

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    The lack of a quill feed could be a problem. As an alternate, consider an Abene VF3. Not as big as the one in question, but a sturdy workhorse.

    Tom

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    The lack of a quill feed could be a problem. As an alternate, consider an Abene VF3. Not as big as the one in question, but a sturdy workhorse.

    Tom

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    Every Shiz I have ever run in my lifetime was built like a brick shitehouse. VERY solid. Able to do real work. Do consider about the lack of quill. I'd want that. But, I'd also want a Uni table. One day I am going to find a Universal Mill in good condition, bearing also a vertical head having a quill and you'll never see another turret mill in my shop afterward. A boy can dream. Can't he?

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    Looks like a great machine, would be 4X as beefy as a bridgeport. FWIW, when I list something with Make Offer I routinely get offers of 50% or less of the listing price, regardless of market value. So - 1. He'll be accustomed to low offers, and 2. He may have listed it high expecting that, If you've never made an offer, he and you get 2 more chances to make counter offers before you have to start over with a new offer.

    I looked at his completed items and he has accepted offers of 10%-25% or more below listing price on other items.

    What will it cost to get that to Utah?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Zahnrad Kopf View Post
    A boy can dream. Can't he?
    Pssst ... Deckel...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mud View Post
    Pssst ... Deckel...
    LOL! Hey buddy! Listen, don't start none, there won't be none. Okay?

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    Its a horizontal mill, its manual. its 2018. Realisticly its not worth much no matter how nice it looks.

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    I’m thinking dials are metric (from grainy video) but need to ask him. I’m gonna check freight cost.

    Maybe I’ll offer $5,000...

    I’m way too dumb to learn CNC computer mumbo-majumbo. Manual for me!

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    Why is it using a vfd for x and y feeds? Busted gearbox?

    L7

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    Same capabilities less vert head

    Fraction of cost

    Fraction of distance

    Far less shine

    When you are done with it scrap it

    Buying Used Cincinnati #2 Horizontal Mill

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    A horizontal mill with cutters stacked on arbors with outboard supports is a production machine. What type of parts are you going to run in production?

    If you get a horizontal with rear controls you can drive it like a small boring mill. Get a vise and mount it upright with the handle pointing up. After you get your head around the different orientation its just like a Bridgeport, only way better.

    As for cost, you can probably buy the freight for about $1.00/mile. But don't forget the cost to unload and position when it gets to you.

    Zahnrad, you need to find a 2B36 or 3(B,H,K)48 DeVlieg. Put a 16" air lift table on the machine and you have about what you describe, only better. 12 or 16" quill travel, power feeds, solid, and capable of working to .0002. 40 taper with power draw bar. Its a machine thats an absolute dream to drive.

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    Quote Originally Posted by TheOldCar View Post
    Iím thinking dials are metric (from grainy video) but need to ask him. Iím gonna check freight cost.

    Maybe Iíll offer $5,000...

    Iím way too dumb to learn CNC computer mumbo-majumbo. Manual for me!
    My first mill was a used Misal, universal, horizontal mill (I paid $6000 for it). I did cut some helical gears on it so the universal function came in handy. It has a swing away vertical head, and spent most of it's life with that head in place. No quill, real men don't need no damn quill, they crank the knee up and down, like men!

    A vertical turrent mill with a quill is a lot handier for light puttering around. And with the higher speeds, you can use small (inexpensive) carbide endmills relatively effectively. I used to cut up to 1" keyways with 1" HSS slot drill (endmills) but no more, now I cut 'em with a 3/8" carbide endmill. With a DRO, I make a far better keyway, without any 'lean' to it.

    Those older machines use some expensive HSS cutters, and the damn things are always dull, and if they're not, then you're worried about using it and making it dull. Unless you get a tool and cutter grinder.....then you find that takes way too long to set up to use and requires more smarts than learning cnc does.

  25. Likes Oldwrench liked this post

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