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  1. #201
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    I just finished the structural part of this project today. Before the final derusting, cleaning, and painting, I want to use it for a spell to put it through its paces. It is a roll around adjustable height support for an engraving block. In the full up position (approximately 4' high), I can use it standing with my surgical loupes. In the lower positions, I can use it seated with the B&L zoom microscope. The adjustable height allows working in comfort and for working on various sized items.

    The heart of the support is part of an old Gorton pantograph engraver. These parts have been sitting out in the weather for years and I decided to finally make something useful from them.

    Preliminary testing indicates that it will work quite well with its mass. I also have an aluminum fixture plate which can be attached to the table for working on larger flat items.
    Jim
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails riserengravingblocksupport7.jpg   riserengravingblocksupport8.jpg   riserengravingblocksupport6.jpg   riserengravingblocksupport5.jpg   riserengravingblocksupport4.jpg  


  2. #202
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    Lightbulb My Design on Aloris Tool Coolant Nozzle

    Hi,

    Here are a few pictures of my design for applying coolant to your Aloris tool post system.

    It is made from UHMW but any material would work. 1/4" Pipe Thread holes were machined near the top and bottom. The allows the unit to be flipped over and used on either a left or right hand tool. The nozzle end of the brass fitting allows for custom bends for any tool configuration. On the fluid supply end I utilize a swivel right angle quick disconnect fitting that allows for quick and easy coolant line connection as you change tools.

    No more fiddling around adjusting the fluid control to your tool. I also have a fluid control valve that can easily control the amount of fluid that is supplied to the tool. Furthermore, I have a small ball valve that can turn the coolant off during tool changes. Should have patented this one. Ha Ha

    I also made some Aloris tool post holders for storing my holders while not in use. Made a 1" square post about 2 foot tall and mounted the holders alternating to different sides. I mounted the post to the right side of my Clausing coolant drip pan. Out of the way and provides excellent tool storage and tools are easily accessible.

    This system has made my lathe a joy to use.

    John
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails img_0848a.jpg   img_0849a.jpg   img_0903a.jpg   img_0853a.jpg   img_0933a.jpg  


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  4. #203
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    Default Hacksaw

    These are very old, best hacksaw I have ever used and fixture for brazing saw blades. I didn't make them.
    Bob
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails tools-001.jpg  

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  6. #204
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    Quote Originally Posted by HelicopterJohn View Post

    I also made some Aloris tool post holders for storing my holders while not in use. Made a 1" square post about 2 foot tall and mounted the holders alternating to different sides. I mounted the post to the right side of my Clausing coolant drip pan. Out of the way and provides excellent tool storage and tools are easily accessible.


    John

    Pics please!

  7. #205
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    Default Surface grinder belt attachment

    This is a belt conversion attachment I made for my Boyar-Schultz 612. I have found it to be really useful not just on knife blades (the reason for the conversion) but also for titanium, carbon fiber and wood.

    Bob

    SURFACE GRINDER BELT CONVERSION by Ranger_Bob, on Flickr

    Untitled by Ranger_Bob, on Flickr

    Untitled by Ranger_Bob, on Flickr

  8. #206
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    That's clever,Bob,for putting a decent looking finish on knives.

  9. #207
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    Default One way to hold tool holders that is pretty convenient

    I made a simple wooden bar rack to hold my toolholders. It is fixed to the backsplash of my lathe and is very convenient. You can see that it has dovetail on the top of the part that holds the holders but the bottom of the bar is a straight segment. That allows the holders to be dropped on and picked off and not have to be slid down the bar for removal or placement. The cove cut midway between the dovetail top and the straight bottom provides clearance for the height adjustment mechanism on the holders. I also built a little platform on my headstock as Monarch did not provide the usual flat area common on so many lathes. The tools that are in active uuse like a general cutter, threading tool, and a parting tool might sit on the headstock while making a given part and the others not needed for that part stay on the back row. More "odd ball" tool holders are stored in a drawer.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails image.jpg   image.jpg   image.jpg  

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  11. #208
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    Someone already mentioned this in another thread. Simple, fast modification to a common tool to increase usefulness.

    It seems like I always need three or four hands when using an arbor press that doesn’t have a hole and set screw in the ram – especially when dealing with small parts. The original writer suggested tapping the ram and then making tooling from grade 8 bolts to avoid the necessity of heat treatment. (Grade 8 fasteners have high yield strength and hardness > Rc30 - about the same as 4140 pre-hardened.)





    The ram was tapped 1/2-20UNC-2B. I picked up a dozen 1-1/2 long grade 8 bolts, turned the heads off and turned to desired diameters. The remaining bolts are stored and available to make the next special tool required for the arbor press.

    Simple and effective - I wish that I could remember who suggested this so I could give him credit.
    Last edited by randyc; 01-22-2015 at 05:28 PM. Reason: brain slower than typing speed

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  13. #209
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    Quote Originally Posted by dgfoster View Post
    I made a simple wooden bar rack to hold my toolholders. It is fixed to the backsplash of my lathe and is very convenient. You can see that it has dovetail on the top of the part that holds the holders but the bottom of the bar is a straight segment. That allows the holders to be dropped on and picked off and not have to be slid down the bar for removal or placement. The cove cut midway between the dovetail top and the straight bottom provides clearance for the height adjustment mechanism on the holders. I also built a little platform on my headstock as Monarch did not provide the usual flat area common on so many lathes. The tools that are in active uuse like a general cutter, threading tool, and a parting tool might sit on the headstock while making a given part and the others not needed for that part stay on the back row. More "odd ball" tool holders are stored in a drawer.
    Thats nice. You should break up the rails into many little rails with gaps inbetween so it becomes an independent holder for each tool. Easier to take stuff out if you need to say take the middle tool out. Gotta empty the whole lot first.

  14. #210
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    Quote Originally Posted by cncdumm View Post
    Thats nice. You should break up the rails into many little rails with gaps inbetween so it becomes an independent holder for each tool. Easier to take stuff out if you need to say take the middle tool out. Gotta empty the whole lot first.
    The bottom doesn't have a dovetail so the toolholders lift right out.

  15. #211
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    I used some scraps I had left of plastic deck trim to make my tool block holder.

    003.jpg

    004.jpg

    005.jpg

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  17. #212
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    Thanks. That is my plan as well, but using delrin for the dovetails. I'll mount them on a 20 degree-from-vertical tilt to keep them from sliding off. I'll post pics someday when I get it done.

  18. #213
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    Lightbulb Picture of Vertical Tool bar for Aloris Holders.

    Quote Originally Posted by aerodark View Post
    Pics please!
    Hi Aerodark,

    Here is the picture your requested. I rotated the tool holders from side to side making it easy for storage and removal.

    John
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 20140306_161855a.jpg  

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  20. #214
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    Quote Originally Posted by cncdumm View Post
    Thats nice. You should break up the rails into many little rails with gaps inbetween so it becomes an independent holder for each tool. Easier to take stuff out if you need to say take the middle tool out. Gotta empty the whole lot first.
    You must've missed the part about the fact that the holders individually are able to be removed from the rack since it only has a dovetail on top as detailed in my note above. Take a close look at the photos and I think you will see that the bottom of the rail is square and the top only has the dovetail.

    Denis

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    Cool stuff! Lots of good projects here that I might incorporate ideas from.

    Keep 'em coming.

    Brent

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    Nothing too fancy, but here's a small angle-plate that I made several years ago. The shame was, I hardly got to use it before taking a different job. We finally got a surface grinder at the new Job, and since I've been able to use it a few times.

    The grinding wheel wasn't big enough to reach in and grind the inside faces, so I had to side-dress and side-grind the wheel to grind the taller inside face. All said and done, I think the whole thing was square and parallel within .0006" or so. It was a fun project. The part is D2, hardened around 60HRC or so. Best part is, I don't think it'll get mistaken for anyone else's...

    angle-plate-1.jpg

    angle-plate-3.jpg
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails angle-plate-1.jpg   angle-plate-2.jpg   angle-plate-2.jpg  

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  24. #217
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    Quote Originally Posted by cncdumm View Post
    Thats nice. You should break up the rails into many little rails with gaps inbetween so it becomes an independent holder for each tool. Easier to take stuff out if you need to say take the middle tool out. Gotta empty the whole lot first.
    Check OP's post again ...

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    woah woah woah.. chill out. I just took a look at first pic. Its a picture thread. Didn't read his post. Ok good idea you can lift it off.

  26. #219
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jashley73 View Post
    Nothing too fancy, but here's a small angle-plate that I made several years ago. The shame was, I hardly got to use it before taking a different job. We finally got a surface grinder at the new Job, and since I've been able to use it a few times.

    The grinding wheel wasn't big enough to reach in and grind the inside faces, so I had to side-dress and side-grind the wheel to grind the taller inside face. All said and done, I think the whole thing was square and parallel within .0006" or so. It was a fun project. The part is D2, hardened around 60HRC or so. Best part is, I don't think it'll get mistaken for anyone else's...

    angle-plate-1.jpg

    angle-plate-3.jpg
    If you did side grinding with a surface grinder, did you dress the wheel on its side also?

  27. #220
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    Beautiful work!


    Quote Originally Posted by gwilson View Post
    I have posted these things before,but since you are asking for shop made items,here are some. The first one is an oval drawing device for the cabinet shop in the museum I worked at(Williamsburg) as tool maker.

    Next is an 18th. C. amputating knife. I freehand ground the hollow ground blade,which is nearly as thin as a straight razor near the cutting edge. It was sharpened to a reasonable degree,but not as sharp as a razor,since I did not want the staff at the Apothecary Shop to accidentally cut themselves on it. They sometimes demonstrate it using a piece of fruit,such as an eggplant. My journeyman,Jon made the ebony handle. It is a careful copy of an early 18th. C. knife from an illustration in a period book.

    Next is a brass dividing attachment for a rotary table.

    Next is a nineteenth C. style of brass drill. The handles are rosewood. It has 2 bevel gears,which I cut using the dividing attachment. It is not a copy of any particular drill. These apparently were made by the users as I haven't found any pictures of factory made ones this elaborate. I enjoy designing things like this. The large gear is 4" in diameter. The drill is about 16" overall length.

    Last is a beak or bic iron I made from 01 steel and hardened. It is for silver work.


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