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  1. #41
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    is there a source for those switches that would sell small quantities?

    Quote Originally Posted by Jeweltool View Post
    Z-Axis Tool Sensor for CNC Milling Machines.

    Uses the same Omron sensor found in the Metrol line of tool sensors.

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    My 2x72" knife grinder:





    Regards.

    Finegrain

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    Default How does this worK???

    Quote Originally Posted by Darren UK View Post
    Here you go, simple to make and effective. With one of these threading couldn't be simpler

    Nice work everybody.

    Darren, does your toolbit block flip up an out of the way for the return pass?

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    Quote Originally Posted by b sco View Post
    There is a trade school in Wisconsin where the students build a vertical mill as a project. I owned one of the earlier ones for a while, and milled everything from wood to steel with it. I wish you guys could see one of them, they are pretty cool.
    Anybody know which school this is, specifically? Thx, Jim

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ferrous Antiquos View Post
    Nice work everybody.

    Darren, does your toolbit block flip up an out of the way for the return pass?
    Yes that's right. Locks down for cutting, lifts up and rides the work on the return. No need to use a threading dial or wind the crosslide out. Just feed it in a little with each cutting pass.

    Couldn't be simpler, and it works well.

    http://madmodder.net/index.php?topic=2462.0

  7. #46
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    Here is an adapter for a drill to the knee crank on a Bridgeport. The material is 12L14, which is GREAT to machine BTW. The main body is 1.625" in diameter and 1.75" long, then there's the shank that fits in the drill chuck, which is .5" in diameter and 1" long with three flats .020" deep so it doesn't spin. The functional dimensions were just taken from the stock crank as far as depth and number of teeth (nine divisions makes the teeth, the cutter edge is set on the center line of the part), the diameter and depth of that counterbore (.950 diameter, .250" deep), and the size and depth of the hole (.625" diameter, 1.6" deep).



    This is going to be one of the intermediate level machining projects for my class next semester. It's a useful part that gives lathe and milling experience, including using the dividing head and the co-ax indicator. I'm going to make sure to change a few things though. If you look at the teeth, they're angled a bit on the inside ends because I used a 3/16" endmill. It doesn't seem to affect it, but that's not like the original, so I think an 1/8" endmill is in order. I'll also have them turn down the body to reduce the weight. This thing is heavy!!!

    Edit: I just uploaded a video of it in action onto youtube

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FwWA1JZoEgc
    Last edited by hornluv; 05-02-2010 at 08:54 AM. Reason: Wanted to add a video link

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  9. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by bosleyjr View Post
    Anybody know which school this is, specifically? Thx, Jim
    I visited this school, it's in Superior, WI, and saw the mill. It's really impressive. The knee and head are castings they machine there, they make the vises and everything. It's really neat.

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    Finegrain,is there no platen behind the belt ?

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    Hornluv,

    I have always threatened to make one of those but never did. That looks like a good CNC mill project for me.

    Thanks for the reminder.



    JAckal

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    Quote Originally Posted by gwilson View Post
    Finegrain,is there no platen behind the belt ?
    There is, along with a table in front of the belt. As configured in the pic, it's in "slack belt" mode. This is for sharpening the kitchen knives, deburring parts, etc. The platen and table are used for sharpening form cutters, shaping lathe cutters, that sort of thing. There's also a variety of contact wheels that go in place of the 2-wheel arm, for freeform shaping.

    Regards.

    Finegrain

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    Quote Originally Posted by jackal View Post
    Hornluv,

    I have always threatened to make one of those but never did. That looks like a good CNC mill project for me.

    Thanks for the reminder.



    JAckal
    Definitely do it. I finished it on Thursday and have gotten so much use and enjoyment out of it that I've been kicking myself for not doing it sooner. To think of all that time wasted cranking the knee handle.

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    Well my tool is not in the league of alot of these tools, but I made this spring loaded pilot for hand tapping in my lathe. It works pretty well actually!


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    Default Milling Machine Power Knee

    My answer to the problem of manually raising and lowering the knee on my milling machine was solved by adding a motor to the system. The mill design was set up for a drive motor with a chain sprocket on the drive shaft. I added a VFD to operate the motor. Check out the article at the link provided.

    JRW
    http://www.homemetalshopclub.org/new...912.pdf#Page=7

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike RzMachine View Post
    is there a source for those switches that would sell small quantities?


    Hi Mike

    Not sure what you are wanting. Is it the complete Z-axis sensor or just the sensor itself?

    We make the complete unit but buy the Omron sensor inside it.

    Jack

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    Default Nicely done.

    Hornluv,

    The point about the edge of the cut being on the center line had evaded me as I contemplated making one of these. Thank you for pointing that out. Sure makes things easier to set up.

    Denis.

    Quote Originally Posted by hornluv View Post
    Here is an adapter for a drill to the knee crank on a Bridgeport. The material is 12L14, which is GREAT to machine BTW. The main body is 1.625" in diameter and 1.75" long, then there's the shank that fits in the drill chuck, which is .5" in diameter and 1" long with three flats .020" deep so it doesn't spin. The functional dimensions were just taken from the stock crank as far as depth and number of teeth (nine divisions makes the teeth, the cutter edge is set on the center line of the part), the diameter and depth of that counterbore (.950 diameter, .250" deep), and the size and depth of the hole (.625" diameter, 1.6" deep).

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    Great stuff guys!
    Just to address the above entry, thank you 11echo, I need one of those spring loaded tap centers!

    I've posted this before but there are several new guys contributing/watching this thread and this has been very useful and to illustrate that it is very doable.

    I was jealous of all the guys with collet chucks on their lathes, wanted/needed one for my 17" lathe with an 1-9/16" spindle bore and didn't wan't to reduce the capacity of through-spindle-feed with a draw bar tube, which required that I employ a chuck with a locking collar nut. I chose the TG150 which max's out at 1.5" with superior gripping power.


    Bored, knurled, threaded and mounted on spindle.


    IMPORTANT: taper bored and ground in place on the spindle that it will be used on, for "as-good-as-it-gets" concentricity.
    Note the TG150 collet below on the head stock, w/ a full 3" length of tapered gripping surface.


    Finished.


    1/2" collet.


    1-1/2" chucked.


    "BUT", you say, "my lathe is bigger/smaller than yours." The TG series is numbered to actual size, 150 being 1-1/2", starting with the 1/2" TG50 and ending with the 2-1/2" TG250, IIRC.
    If I were as smart as I think I am, I would have opted for TG200 or even (rare) TG250, still limited to 1-1/2" spindle through-put but in the case of the TG250, 2-1/2" "chucking" capability, don't need no steenking "emergency collets".

    The similar ER series of collets would be my second choice, more common so generally a little less pricey, covering a bit greater range with less collets and nearly as capable in gripping strength but vastly superior to the tiny length of the gripping taper/part grip area engagement on R8 and 5C. That was important to me on my old low speed lathe, with the only high metal removal rate method being hogging cuts, well, "hogging" for my light LeBlond. Superior grip can't be bad and a "full" set covers all, metric, inch, cubit or Klingon.

    Just gotta' say here, the genius of Frank Ford is the little extra usefulness he conjures-up like Merlin, to greatly expand utility, such as his above "set of "telescoping" plug cutters," each producing the plug that fits the size hole produced by the next smaller! Any of you who missed the link to his treasure trove, HomeShopTech needs to do him self a big favor. Caution, it will take a while but boy is it ever worth it to the types perusing this thread!

    Bob
    Last edited by Robert Campbell Jr.; 05-02-2010 at 04:33 PM. Reason: Misspelled genious....yup.....

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    Quote Originally Posted by dgfoster View Post
    Hornluv,

    The point about the edge of the cut being on the center line had evaded me as I contemplated making one of these. Thank you for pointing that out. Sure makes things easier to set up.

    Denis.
    No problem. Actually, if you want it to fit, put the cutter a few thousandths on the small side of center (i.e. a 1/8" endmill would put offset .060" from center instead of .0625"), otherwise the crank just won't go on. I tested my part with the hand crank before removing it from the dividing head so at least I didn't have to start with the sailor talk when I found that out .

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    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Campbell Jr. View Post
    IMPORTANT: taper bored and ground in place on the spindle that it will be used on, for "as-good-as-it-gets" concentricity.
    Note the TG150 collet below on the head stock, w/ a full 3" length of tapered gripping surface.


    Bob
    Bob,

    Is that Dremel toolpost grinder, or a Rotozip toolpost grinder? Any pics of the setup? How well did it perform?

    Agreed on Frank's website. Every time I cruise it I learn something new. Thanks Frank!

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  23. #59
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    I made a RotoZip TPG a few years ago. Yes it will work on hard materials. Initially the finish was OK but not great. The finish deteriorated as the bearings wore out. It will work (for some definition of work) for a while but it is far from a suitable substitute for a proper TPG.

    -DU-

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    It is a Rotozip and it worked very well.

    I've since bought the beginnings of a tool post grinder from a member and will not have to answer questions like this anymore.

    Kidding, it was nearly new and very tight. I just welded a piece of 1-1/2" angle iron to a piece of 1-1/4" bar to fit in a QC boring bar holder, nested the Rotozip in the angle, then judically applied pressure, (plastic body you know) with a "radiator" clamp. Grabbed the nose and wiggled it while I tightend the clamp, quiting when it "snugged up."



    I mounted a diamond dressing tip in an indicator holder and carefully dressed it in place. It all turned out much better than I feared. Note that I "experimented" with the grind, prior to finishing the body and threading it. Here the tapered bore is rough ground and I'm touching up the stone for the final passes, compound set to taper. It's a Norton, 46 grit mounted stone.


    Since then, the collets have slightly polished the unhardened bore, which is serving me perfectly well. If I'd intended it for production, I'd have machined it from toolsteel and heat treated it prior to grinding. For my prototyping needs, it would have been a waste of tool steel but I do carefully wipe the bore and collet prior to insertion.

    Bob

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