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  1. #121
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    Default Small English Wheel

    Here's a small English wheel that my brother built.

    The rollers are made from the centres of industrial neoprene tyred wheels with the tread removed.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails small-english-wheel-1.jpg   small-english-wheel-2.jpg  

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  3. #122
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    Default Miniature English Wheel

    Here's a miniature English wheel that my brother built.

    The rollers are simply two ball races with the lower one shaped on a grinder and polished.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails mini-english-wheel-1.jpg   mini-english-wheel-2.jpg   mini-english-wheel-3.jpg  

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  5. #123
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    Quote Originally Posted by Billtodd View Post
    You won't know how handy it is until you've made one...

    Simple length of tube turned and faced with grooves to set tool height.
    Bill,

    It's simply too elegant and will take all the fun out of dialing in tool heights!

    Oh hell with it, I'm gonna make one too!



    I'm still making hammers, I have another group of 20 in the works now which should bring me to around serial number 50!




  6. #124
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    For centering up tool bits on the lathe, I use these. Have made and sold bunches of them and they work pretty well on any lathe. No need to make something separate for each lathe.



    Hereis an arbor made to fit my Clausing 8540 horizontal mill. Could have bought one hardened and ground from China for $25 but, I spent the time making it anyway. NMTB 30

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  8. #125
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    Why did this thread stop?? I'm a 30 year machinist but everything I made for myself looks like a cave man made it lol. This is great stuff y'all....so don't stop posting pics!

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  10. #126
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    Quote Originally Posted by Billtodd View Post
    My Haighton is a bit short on room between the vertical head and the bed (Hardinge TM UM owners will know what I mean) so I built this low profile coax indicator specially for it. (see madmodders)
    Nice work.
    I followed the link to the discussions on magnetic pickups.

    I suggest looking a linear variable differential transformer (LVDT)
    They are cheap, accurate and easy to apply.
    see here: Linear variable differential transformer - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    for explanation.
    I would mount a LVDT up the centre of the arbor. I would have a sleeve with a crank pivoted on the lower edge.

    Wobble and runout could be reduced by using a pair of preloaded bearings rather than a sliding fit (which must always have clearance between the surfaces).

    Attached is a concept sketch. A lot of work would be needed to convert this to a proper design.

    The advantages are that a very short gauge could be made, especially if the bearings are mounted back to back (not as drawn). The LVDT can go right up the centre of the arbor so wouldn't add to the length.

    The disadvantages are that the unit would need a cable to a separate display, power supply and controller. Of course, it would be possible to squeeze all of this into the gauge with custom electronics.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails axial-gauge.jpg  

  11. #127
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    I made a radius turing tool for my Nardini a couple years back. Uses a machined hub and tapered spindle bearings. It is adjustable up and down but the base assembly mounts specifically to my Nardini's Compound t-slot.

    I "Blued" it as well which is why it is the color it is.

    The second 2 pics are of another cutter that uses a small carbide insert to cut radii much smaller 1" and up. I use this tool for making tube bending dies. It fits on my bxa QCTP.

    Grant
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails radius-ball-cutter.jpg   radius-ball-cutter-2.jpg   die5.jpg   radius-tool-convex.jpg  

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  13. #128
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cranky1 View Post
    but everything I made for myself looks like a cave man made it lol. !

    You and me both! LOL!
    Mostly because of lack of time.

    Jeff

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  15. #129
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    I really enjoyed reading through all the previous posts and viewing the pictures of all the cool shop-made tools. Some are very enspiring to me, and wish I had the time to make them myself.
    Over the years I am constantly thinking of tools I should make for myself to use on the machines, but I just never really have the time to spend on my own projects. I can say that Ive made many usefull custom tools for cutters and taps over the years, but mainly because what I needed wasnt readily availible. Ive also made countless jigs and fixtures for doing specific jobs, but Im sure thats wth any shop, and I dont think I have any pictures of them.
    I have found several home-made tools in some of my tool boxes also, but made by previous machinists that we acquired over the years.
    I have been planning on building my very own welding turntable one day using a 36" faceplate thats been sitting in the corner for decades. My first thoughts were to make it free spinning, but I would now like to build it with a variable speed system.... if I can round up the right parts at Motion.
    As mentioned before, I just dont have anough free time to build all the projects and custom tools that Im constantly thinking of. But seeing some of what other have made gives me more motivation to use what free time I have to spend on my own ideas.
    This is something I did design and build myself though. I wanted a shelf next to my mill to hold the Kurt vise and 8" superspacer that would swing out of the way when not in use. Although Im a big guy, I get tired of picking up that heavy equipent everyday!




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    Great idea! Here is a quick idea to add to your design.

    If you used the base/column of a cheap floor-based drill press to hold your shelves, you could use the crank from the drill table to raise and lower the shelves to the appropriate height so you can just slide the heavy stuff from the appropriate shelf to the mill table without lifting!

  17. #131
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    Quote Originally Posted by biometrics View Post
    Great idea! Here is a quick idea to add to your design.

    If you used the base/column of a cheap floor-based drill press to hold your shelves, you could use the crank from the drill table to raise and lower the shelves to the appropriate height so you can just slide the heavy stuff from the appropriate shelf to the mill table without lifting!
    I'm betting he has a power feed on his knee, that allows him to raise and lower it to the tool shelves

  18. #132
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    I suggest looking a linear variable differential transformer (LVDT)
    They are cheap, accurate and easy to apply.
    see here: Linear variable differential transformer - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    for explanation.
    I would mount a LVDT up the centre of the arbor. I would have a sleeve with a crank pivoted on the lower edge.
    Neat idea.

    RE: your drawing. Are you proposing to keep the spindle and arbour still and revolve the head by hand? Because, if you could arrange for the probe to turn with the spindle while keeping the cables still then it would be possible to resolve the X and Y axes to two displays thus making the adjustment much easier.

    In fact if you had a wireless head unit (Infra-red perhaps)that could detect a reference point on the mill it could transmit X and Y offsets to a remote display (how neat would that be !)

    Bill

  19. #133
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    I made a radius turing tool for my Nardini a couple years back.
    Snap!

    (Although yours are much better made )
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails turning-former2.jpg  

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  21. #134
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    Steady rest I made years ago.
    100_1362-stdy-.jpg

    100_1361-stdy-.jpg

  22. #135
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    Quote Originally Posted by biometrics View Post
    Great idea! Here is a quick idea to add to your design.

    If you used the base/column of a cheap floor-based drill press to hold your shelves, you could use the crank from the drill table to raise and lower the shelves to the appropriate height so you can just slide the heavy stuff from the appropriate shelf to the mill table without lifting!

    As Billtodd said, the mill does have the Servo on the knee so its quick and easy to line up the shelf and slide the tools off. Its nothing fancy, just materials I already had in the shop.

  23. #136
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.Ramsey View Post
    Steady rest I made years ago.
    100_1362-stdy-.jpg

    100_1361-stdy-.jpg
    That is exactly what I need to do for my 21x120 Acra-Turn lathe. It only came with a 6" capacity s/r and I need one larger. I called Acra recently and I can buy a 10" for around 700, or a 12" for aboout $900. I should just save my money and build one like you did.

  24. #137
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    Quote Originally Posted by Billtodd View Post
    Neat idea.

    RE: your drawing. Are you proposing to keep the spindle and arbour still and revolve the head by hand? Because, if you could arrange for the probe to turn with the spindle while keeping the cables still then it would be possible to resolve the X and Y axes to two displays thus making the adjustment much easier.

    In fact if you had a wireless head unit (Infra-red perhaps)that could detect a reference point on the mill it could transmit X and Y offsets to a remote display (how neat would that be !)

    Bill
    The intention was to keep the spindle / arbor still (avoiding the problem of cables wrapping around the arbor) and rotating the outer sleeve by hand. The LVDT and arbor remain stationary.

    I understand that the need for wires and a (small) power supply, display etc will not appeal to many members.

    It would be entirely feasible to get rid of the wires and replace with a Bluetooth wireless link. Batteries and everything could fit within the arbor. This could then display readings on another Bluetooth device (eg. mobile phone, Ipad). How cool would that be.

  25. #138
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    Shop-MADE tools thread. Post a pic or start another thread.


    Mostly 'cause I don't understand all that techy stuff.

  26. #139
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    Default Welding Positioner

    Here's my positioner made from an old rotary table, 12" 3-jaw chuck, and a 90vdc variable gear motor......

    angles all positions from horz to vert....fork pockets for vari height....
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails spring2010-002.jpg  

  27. #140
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    Default Hammers

    There have been a multitude of very nice looking hammers but all are with round cross section handles. Round handles are difficult to control.
    JRW


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