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  1. #141
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    JR, is this better?


    Cricket's new hammer by fciron, on Flickr

    Also, I made some wedges and feathers to split out a big chunk of concrete in my dirt floor so I could put in a proper chunk of concrete for my lathe.


    Wedge and feathers by fciron, on Flickr

    Cut! by fciron, on Flickr

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  3. #142
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    Crane for the mill,air hoist .
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails mill-hoist-medium-.jpg   kurt-vise-medium-.jpg  

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  5. #143
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    A little tool I whipped up this week, and the tool it replaced.


  6. #144
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    This is a lead mold my grandad made years ago for making lead "knockers" as we call them. They are very handy for indicating and bumping parts around. If you come in my shop you will see them laying around every machine. When they mushroom out too far, I throw them in a pile and eventually re-pour them back to new. I still have a huge stack of them in a cabinet from the last time we melted them all down.




  7. #145
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    Default Depth tool for clockmaking

    Hi Everyone,

    Okay I finally broke down & opened a Photobucket account.

    Here is a depth tool I made 30+ years ago. It was to help w/construction of a precision clock I was going to build.



    The smaller one is a commercially available one for watch work and the chunks of bronze in the rear were what I started with. The bronze had been a riser that someone made for a Delta Toolmaker surface grinder I had at the time.

    When I finished this tool and went to design the clock movement, I found the tool was too small so I had to make the taller arms that are installed on one side.





    I made a few changes to the standard design. I.E. the opening mechanism & return springs because I didn't like the way spring & screw just scrape against the outside & inside of the arms of the old style.



    For those of you that don't know how this is used, you place the two arbors with their gears in place between the centers (or reverse centers). Then adjust the tool to get the tooth contact you desire. Next turn the tool upright and you have a ready made dividers to scribe the plates for locating where to drill/bore the pivot holes.

    Used to be a standard tool for hand making a clock movement.

    Best wishes to ya'll.

    Sincerely,

    Jim

    P.S. A couple of more things. Long before CNC or DROs. I didn't have a rotary table yet either. I turned my dividing head upright and took light cuts for the curved sides.

    Obviously a lot of hand work too.
    Last edited by jhe.1973; 05-01-2011 at 10:10 AM.

  8. #146
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    Jim, that is some *very* nice work! I'll bet your talents have moved forward a bit over those 30 years as well !

    Congratulations!
    ... Gregg

  9. #147
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    Quote Originally Posted by gregg-k View Post
    Jim, that is some *very* nice work! I'll bet your talents have moved forward a bit over those 30 years as well !

    Congratulations!
    ... Gregg
    Thanks Gregg,

    This depth tool actually helped me land a job as an instrument maker for the Physics & Astronomy department of a university. My resume opened the door but, when I pulled this thing out, the supervisor who was interviewing me did a double take.

    Working there w/several talented, helpful guys was a great way to "move forward". We supported several electron microscopes and a lot of UHV chambers around the campus.

    Thanks again for your kind words.

    Best wishes to you.

    Sincerely,

    Jim

    P.S. The clock I built w/this can be viewed at www.jim-haubert.com/id7.html if you are interested.

  10. #148
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    Exceptional Jim, design and execution.

    "I turned my dividing head upright and took light cuts for the curved sides." In as much as the two gear shafts are controlled by the centers, what is the purpose of the "curved sides" on yet a third but fixed center to the others? I don't see a method of clamping those to a work-fixture post or arbor, plus, the centers arms that are common to the yoke with curved sides, would not allow passage of a large shaft beyond them...?

    All the above because I don't understand what capability is provided by mounting one pair of centers on a yoke, with the other centers mounted on separate arms, joined into perpendicularity with the curved arm yoke.

    Or am I just overthinking this and they are simply an artistic touch, comparable to "The scroll shape of the ends of what is often called the "beat plate" which is very nice.

    Also, I'm assuming lateral adjustment of gears to their shafts to insure perpendicularity, (equal point projection)* to the plate being laid out, when the points are used as scribes?
    *or not, as when the larger center cone is centering on a completed bearing bore.

    Thank's, I'm with the supervisor "doing a double take" and obviously more....

    Bob

  11. #149
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    Hi Bob,

    When I made this, I had a book on clockmaking/repairing & used that for the dimensions supplied as a starting point. Given the curve & length of the bushing that I was cutting the material from I had to make changes right from the start. I tried to flatten the material in a press which is why it broke teaching me that it wasn't rolled brass but cast bronze - probably bearing bronze.

    I called this bushing a riser 'cuz that's how it came to me on my grinder.

    The curved sides of the tool are to allow a more unobstructed view of the tooth meshing area. But when I found that the diameter of the large gears that I needed wouldn't clear the frame, I made the extension arms.

    Making longer arms meant that I couldn't make them with the same curve because of the curved shape of the bushing wouldn't allow it. So this deviation from tradition was due to the restriction of the material I was working with.

    Probably because the gears that I designed were larger than what the book's author had in mind, the straight legs didn't get in the way.

    Concerning the larger center, this one is used in the hole that is made for the arbor that extends for the center hands. Because this is fixed in relation to the dial it is usually the starting point for the layout of the gear train starting as a hole, not just a scribe line.

    Thanks for taking the time to check the complete clock out.

    The dial started out as the lid to a 55 gal. drum, the pendulum tubes were kitchen sink drain tubes, the pendulum shaft was a curtain rod & I already said where the scrap lumber came from. So actually my problems with the bronze were due to my being too cheap to buy the material I needed, but it sounds better to blame the material.

    I've been meaning to call you to talk more about your engine 'cuz it's quite interesting. I'd even consider meeting you at ASU sometime if that would be possible.

    Best wishes everyone.

    Sincerely,

    Jim

    P.S. Have to run some errands for a bit - I'll check back later.

    P.P.S. Just remembered, I turned the springs from an old truck axle & re-heat treated them to spring temper. Am I nuts or what?
    Last edited by jhe.1973; 05-02-2011 at 02:07 AM.

  12. #150
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    QUOTE: "P.P.S. Just remembered, I turned the springs from an old truck axle & re-heat treated them to spring temper. Am I nuts or what?" Absolutely!

    Even more impressive Jim, love your materials sources.

    Sure Jim, ASU. I'll let you know when the next trip is coming. Long round trip for you though, 350 winding but beautiful miles?

    Bob

  13. #151
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    Default Domestic Bliss Restorer

    Here's a little tool for removing the bread-maker blade from a hot loaf.

    Bill Todd
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails blade-handle-1.jpg   blade-handle-2.jpg   blade-handle-3.jpg  

  14. #152
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    Cool Love the idea, coping it!

    I m working on something like this. Kinda winging it as I go. Thank you for helping me save some cash! Now I m working some CR thats about 22RC. Tuff stuff to turn. Now I just need to pick a collet to use. Any ideas?? I have a Logan 820(yeah it sucks too, work with what you have) any ideas on what collet to pick? I know its probley hard to find but it looks like I maybe able to fit a 4C in the stock I m using. I know it wont fit into my MT3 in the head stock.
    Thanks again for a great thread! Love it!




    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Campbell Jr. View Post
    It is a Rotozip and it worked very well.

    I've since bought the beginnings of a tool post grinder from a member and will not have to answer questions like this anymore.

    Kidding, it was nearly new and very tight. I just welded a piece of 1-1/2" angle iron to a piece of 1-1/4" bar to fit in a QC boring bar holder, nested the Rotozip in the angle, then judically applied pressure, (plastic body you know) with a "radiator" clamp. Grabbed the nose and wiggled it while I tightend the clamp, quiting when it "snugged up."



    I mounted a diamond dressing tip in an indicator holder and carefully dressed it in place. It all turned out much better than I feared. Note that I "experimented" with the grind, prior to finishing the body and threading it. Here the tapered bore is rough ground and I'm touching up the stone for the final passes, compound set to taper. It's a Norton, 46 grit mounted stone.


    Since then, the collets have slightly polished the unhardened bore, which is serving me perfectly well. If I'd intended it for production, I'd have machined it from toolsteel and heat treated it prior to grinding. For my prototyping needs, it would have been a waste of tool steel but I do carefully wipe the bore and collet prior to insertion.

    Bob

  15. #153
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    Post Webpage?

    Quote Originally Posted by A_Pmech View Post
    Bob,

    Is that Dremel toolpost grinder, or a Rotozip toolpost grinder? Any pics of the setup? How well did it perform?

    Agreed on Frank's website. Every time I cruise it I learn something new. Thanks Frank!
    What website, I m always looking for more information on machining.
    When I sirved in the army or DI would call us D.I.C.K.s
    Dedicated Individual to Collective Knowledge

  16. #154
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    Here's a little cut off tool holder I made. It fits the Chinese 7x lathes. You just take off the normal tool holder, place this thing on the mounting stud, align it to the side of the chuck, set the carriage, and cut. The whole mounting and alignment process takes a matter of seconds. Moreover, the groove that holds the blade is set such that the top of the blade will always be set at center height.

    The reason this thing works so well is that it is unnecessarily fat (mass=resistance to chatter) and directs the force of the cut directly down into the dovetail way on the compound (instead of applying a twisting force to it).


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  18. #155
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    Default I don't always cut gears.. but when I do I cut them on my milling machine

    Well okay, I have never really cut gears until now. I needed gears for the QC on my lathe and the cost to have them made was just too high. So I set out to make my own. This was a jig I made which used the original gear to index a shaft which held the stock to be cut. I made a cutter and arbor to cut the actual teeth. Yeah not nearly as impressive as other items ive seen on here BUT... im not a machinist by trade, im and IT guy... I just happen to like burning up end mills and setting fires.




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  20. #156
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    I posted this up in the CNC forum. It's a specialty hollow mill for thse little forgings.




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  22. #157
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    I wanted to bump this thread. I wish it were a sticky as I really enjoy some of the brilliant solutions some come up with.

  23. #158
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    I had a little extra time on my hands a few years back so I decided to make an adapter plate for my Bridgeport 90 degree head to be used as a pin grinder. I save all my old end mills and make punches / pins from em.





  24. #159
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    This is a high speed spindle I made for running small endmills. 65000 rpm (or less if required), and I've successfully run 0.2mm (.008") endmills. It uses an outrunner model airplane motor, which runs off a small vsd. The air connection is just for cooling. The spindle is made from an ER8 collet chuck shank.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails hs-spindle.jpg  

  25. #160
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    This is a great thread. Heres a few things that I am pretty darn proud of.

    This is a fly cutter of sorts for cutting an o-ring groove in the face of a workpiece on a horizontal mill. We do this job all the time so it made sense to make a tool like this to plunge in instead of interpolate. This tool worked pretty darn well, so we made a few more for other sizes. The distance to the centerline of the cutting edge was a critical dimension. Since I had TSC available i used an adjustable coolant nozzle from QPM directed at the cutting edge. Worked great.

    2012-01-02_13-59-48_14.jpg2012-01-09_11-05-15_789.jpg

    Another job was for a Wasino G07-M live tool gang lathe. We had one live spindle already but needed two for the job. Wasino wanted a large sum of money and a long lead time for their bracket, so i figured i could do it. Again, center distance was critical. I waterjetted the blank shape. Then i rough milled and drilled the flat features and holes. Then, since i needed (and wanted) everything square, flat, parallel and all that, i ground all the flat surfaces. From there i located the hole, rough bored it to .001 then honed it to finish size.

    2013-03-03_19-20-09_895.jpg2013-03-04_16-24-49_476.jpg


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